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    Gluten-Digesting Enzymes


    Tina Turbin

    Celiac.com 01/23/2012 - After their diagnosis, celiac patients are put on the gluten-free diet, which is the only treatment option currently available. The diet requires total elimination of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, which when ingested causes an autoimmune reaction in celiacs which results in damage to the absorptive finger-like projections that line the small intestine, which are called villi. As diligent as celiacs can be, avoiding gluten can be a challenge, and slip-ups can happen, especially when eating out. In my research, I've come across gluten-digesting enzymes as a new medical treatment option for later down the line and have shared this good news with the gluten-free community. However, gluten-digesting enzymes are already available over the counter to help celiacs and gluten-sensitive people with managing their gluten-free diet. Dr. Nan Kathryn Fuchs, who helped to formulate the Advanced Bionutritionals product, Gluten Sensitivity Formula, shares some information regarding these enzymes and clears up a couple of misconceptions regarding their use.


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    Gluten-Digesting Enzymes

    Furthermore, not all enzyme formulas containing DPP-IV are the same in terms of strength. Dr. Fuchs had her supplement creators formulate a gluten-digesting enzyme that was stronger than the other ones available on the market. The result was Gluten Sensitivity Formula. In her pamphlet, "How to Tell If You're Gluten Sensitive.And What to Do About It If You Are," Dr. Fuchs offers advice on how to take the supplement.

    Dr. Fuchs emphasizes that Gluten Sensitivity Formula isn't intended to replace a gluten-free diet; it is, however, designed to reduce or get rid of a reaction to "small amounts" of what would presumably be unintentionally ingested gluten, such as one may encounter at a restaurant or a dinner party due to cross-contamination. She also recommends taking one or two capsules of the formula "as insurance" before eating meals that might possibly be contaminated with gluten.

    Dr. Fuchs also clears up a myth regarding hydrocholoric acid (HCl), which has been believed to counteract digestive enzymes; this misconception has led to the incorrect advice that one shouldn't take hydrochloric acid and enzymes together. Hydrochloric acid is taken, according to Dr. Fuchs, in order to help with digesting proteins and minerals, for example calcium and iron. She says the supplement is more common among people over the age of 50. In fact, enzymes can only cancel out the benefits of hydrochloric if they alter the pH of the stomach by neutralizing its acids. Dr. Fuchs says that while animal-based enzymes can accomplish this, they are usually formulated with a protective coating or in a form that will prevent this from occurring. What's more, many enzymes, especially gluten-digesting ones, are made from plants. "So you can take them with HCl," Dr. Fuchs says.

    According to Dr. Fuchs, taking gluten-digesting enzymes "can make the difference between being successful on a gluten-free diet and failing." When used correctly, it can help alleviate the symptoms of a reaction caused by accidental gluten ingestion or prevent the reaction from occurring. As a celiac myself, I can say that inadvertent gluten ingestion is still a challenge I face on the gluten-free diet, even though I've been on the diet for years. Dr. Fuch's Gluten Sensitivity Formula is thus a welcome product that will make the lives of the gluten-free community a lot easier.

    Resources:

    • Fuchs, Nan Kathryn, PhD. "How to Tell If You're Gluten Sensitive.And What to Do About It If You Are." Advanced Bionutritionals, 2010.
    • "Digest This: Enzymes Can Help Your Food Intolerance." Living Without: August/September 2010.
    • Food Reactions: Food Intolerance http://www.foodreactions.org/intolerance/index.html
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    Recommended Comments

    What I am still unclear about is a celiac reaction doesn't sound like it has to do with the inability to digest gluten - it is an autoimmune reaction when gluten enters the body. So how would breaking down the gluten help at all? Seems like it is only relevant to gluten intolerance not celiac disease...unless I am missing something? Would love to know if this would help as I have been suffering for two weeks from accidental cross contamination at a dinner party.

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    Guest Justine

    Posted

    Interesting article and I really hope that some day people with celiac disease will be able to take 'something' to eliminate risk of accidental exposure to gluten. Wondering if Dr. Fuchs has published any work on the effectiveness of this enzyme in any peer reviewed journals?

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    Guest Lillian F Massie

    Posted

    Deanna makes a good point and also requires an answer to her question concerning the autoimmune reaction.

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    Guest Bob Messinger

    Posted

    What I am still unclear about is a celiac reaction doesn't sound like it has to do with the inability to digest gluten - it is an autoimmune reaction when gluten enters the body. So how would breaking down the gluten help at all? Seems like it is only relevant to gluten intolerance not celiac disease...unless I am missing something? Would love to know if this would help as I have been suffering for two weeks from accidental cross contamination at a dinner party.

    Deanna, I see the author has not responded to your question, so I thought I'd add my "two cents". I'm not an expert on the subject, but I'm wondering if breaking down gluten, a complex of gliadin and glutelin, into their usable parts (various amino acids) can make it harmless. If that's the case, then adding certain proteolytic enzymes to the diet may help. Studies still being done on this ... and you know the FDA - no claims can ever be made for non-drugs to heal... so look internationally to see if they can be confirmed.

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    Guest Kumar

    Posted

    Good article, thanks. However can anyone tell about full process of gluten digestion in GUT? Why it is allergic to one but not to other?

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    Guest KATIE

    Posted

    I have suffered from clearing my throat repeatedly for hours and hours after eating anything with gluten. It was annoying to me and to everyone else. Taking the gluten sensitivity formula would stop the throat clearing within minutes. Now, they are not making it any more. I have tried other products, but they do not stop the throat clearing. I would to love to buy some more of the gluten sensitivity formula by Dr. Fuchs. My Dr., Highly trained, said there's no way it could help me, but it does. Medical science doesn't know everything. If you know how I may order some more of this fantastic product, please email me. Thanks! Katie

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  • About Me

    Tina Turbin is a world-renowned Celiac advocate who researches, writes, and consults about the benefits of the gluten-free, paleo-ish, low carb and keto diets, and is a full time recipe developer and founder of PaleOmazing.com. Tina also founded and manages the popular website, GlutenFreeHelp.info, voted the #2 .info website in the world. Tina believes that celiacs need to be educated to be able to make informed decisions and that Paleo needs to be tailored to the individual’s physiology to obtain desired results. You can reach her at: INFO@PaleOmazing.com.

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  • Related Articles

    Melissa Blanco
    This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 12/11/2009 - I recently embarked on a quest for family-friendly restaurants that offered gluten-free selections.  I explained this vision to my husband and three children as we set the rules of our experiment: five family members to eat at five restaurants during a five week period.  The challenge - the children were to choose the restaurant, the chosen restaurant couldn’t sell Happy Meals or have a drive-thru window and the restaurant had to be a franchise rather than a local venue.  Additionally, the mom, me, and the only celiac in the family, had the option of not eating if it might compromise her small intestines.  Here is what we discovered:
    Restaurant # 1: Applebee’s
    My children chose to eat at Applebee’s on a Sunday afternoon for lunch.  The atmosphere was friendly and a plentiful kids’ menu was offered.  With over 1900 restaurants nationwide and in 15 other countries, according to the company website, it seems there is an Applebee’s almost everywhere.  Additionally, Applebee’s offers a Weight Watcher’s menu for restaurant patrons who are counting points, which led me to hope an allergy/gluten-free menu would also be provided.
    After we were seated, I perused the menu to read this statement, “To our guests with food sensitivities or allergies.  Applebee’s cannot ensure that menu items do not contain ingredients that might cause an allergic reaction.  Please consider this when ordering.”
    I spoke to a manager and asked if a gluten-free menu was available.  I was informed, “Applebee’s policy is not to guarantee allergy-free food.  Our company does not carry a gluten-free menu, but we can modify food.  For example, we can prepare grilled chicken breast strips for kids, rather than giving them breaded chicken fingers.  Again, we don’t guarantee the food will not come in contact with the allergen.”
    Restaurant #2: Red Robin
    The next stop on our restaurant expedition was Red Robin, which also offers an extensive children’s menu.  According to the company website, there are over 430 Red Robin restaurants, in North America.  After we were seated in our booth, I asked our server if a gluten-free menu was available.  She immediately went to the kitchen and returned with a printed Wheat/Gluten Allergen menu.  Printed on the top of the menu was the statement, “Red Robin relied on our suppliers’ statements of ingredients in deciding which products did not contain certain allergens.  Suppliers may change the ingredients in their products or the way they prepare their products, so please check this list to make sure that the menu item you like still meets your dietary requirements.  Red Robin cannot guarantee that any menu item will be prepared completely free of the allergen in question.”
    Gluten-free offerings were grouped in the following categories: salads; salad dressings; burgers; chicken burgers; entrees; and available side dishes.  The Kids’ menu offered a beef patty burger, turkey patty, and chicken-on-a-stick.  It stated: “Kids may also select from any items listed on the Wheat/Gluten menu as adult items to custom design a wheat/gluten free meal for your child.  This menu is current and valid until 10/1/09.”
    I was informed by our server that when a customer orders from the gluten-free menu, an allergy alert is put on their ticket and the area of food preparation is cleaned to avoid cross-contamination.  Additionally, the fries are prepared in oil specifically designated for fries, and those with a gluten allergy should avoid the fry seasoning.
    I ordered off of the Red Robin gluten-free menu and personally recommend the Crispy Chicken Tender Salad with grilled chicken rather than crispy, no garlic bread, and the honey mustard dressing.
    Restaurant #3: Garlic Jim’s Famous Gourmet Pizza
    It was a Friday evening and my children decided they really wanted to eat pizza for dinner.  This led us to almost break our fast food rule by ordering carryout from a pizza restaurant.  Ordering pizza is an extreme challenge for those suffering from gluten intolerance. Therefore, I had to do my research ahead of time.  I called Papa John’s, Domino’s, Papa Murphy’s and Pizza Hut to confirm that gluten-free pizza is not offered, at any of these pizza chains.  I did find a pizza franchise in my state, called Garlic Jim’s, which offers a gluten-free crust. 
    According to the chain website, “Garlic Jim’s is proud to be the first pizza chain accredited for gluten free food service by the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America.”  Garlic Jim’s Famous Gourmet Pizza is currently located in seven states including; Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Colorado, Tennessee, and Florida.
    I was informed at the restaurant that the gluten-free crust is covered with sauce in a separate area in order to avoid cross contamination although the toppings are put on in the same location where wheat-based crusts are prepared.  Different pans and utensils are used in the preparation of this gluten-free thin crust which costs three dollars more than their traditional pizzas.  The restaurant also posts a sign stating that although they do offer gluten-free pizza, they cannot guarantee the pizza will not come in contact with allergens.
    I recommend the gluten-free pepperoni pizza, and can attest that pizza has never tasted so good.
    Restaurant #4:  The Old Spaghetti Factory
    The Old Spaghetti Factory was established in 1969, and as of today, boasts 39 locations nationwide.  I was quite pleased to discover, when my children chose to eat at The Old Spaghetti Factory, that they offer gluten-free pasta.  Before being seated, I inquired at the hostess desk if a gluten-free menu was available and I was presented with a laminated copy. 
    Each entré includes complimentary salad, bread, and ice cream. Obviously, those with gluten intolerance need to give the bread a pass, but there are viable options available for the remainder of the meal.  Gluten-free salad dressings include pesto and vinaigrette—hold the croutons on the salad.  The main course is a rice pasta with the following sauce choices: marinara; meat; mushroom; mizithra cheese, and; brown butter.  Diners also have the option of adding gluten-free sausage and sliced chicken breast to their meal.  For dessert, a choice of spumoni or vanilla ice cream is offered. 
     I ordered the Manager’s Favorite pasta, which includes a combination of two sauces.  I chose gluten-free pasta topped with marinara sauce and mizithra cheese.  My dinner also included a salad with vinaigrette dressing and spumoni for dessert. 
    Restaurant #5: Outback Steakhouse
    Our final dining choice was the Outback Steakhouse which, according to the company’s website, is an Australian Steakhouse with over 950 locations worldwide.  I was offered a gluten-free menu that is nearly as large as the main menu.  Offerings included appetizers, steaks, chicken, seafood, salads, side dishes, and even a brownie dessert.  The entire gluten-free menu is available on the Outback Steakhouse website, www.outback.com .
    Our server was very knowledgeable of gluten intolerance. I ordered off of the gluten-free menu.  When ordering salads, it is recommended that you request that they be mixed separately to avoid cross contamination.  Overall, it was a very pleasant dining experience for my entire family, with a plentiful menu for me and an ample kids’ menu.
    I would certainly recommend what I ordered— Victoria’s Filet with a baked potato and a salad without croutons.  I passed on the bread which accompanies every meal.  It was a pleasant dining experience at what is quite possibly the restaurant that has set the current gold standard for gluten-free dining.
    Overall, our experiment was a great success with four of the five restaurants we visited offering gluten-free menus.  I advise diners to be cautious wherever they eat because even if a company offers gluten-free options you must also take into account the knowledge of the chef preparing your food and the server assisting you.  It is encouraging that major restaurant chains are acknowledging the need to modify their menus for those suffering from gluten intolerance.  Good luck and happy dining.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/09/2011 - The Publix supermarket company recently pulled its fall issue of Publix GreenWise Market magazine, because it included a recipe that was erroneously labeled as 'gluten-free.'
    The company also announced plans to mail a follow-up warning about the recipe to print subscribers.
    The recipe for Orange-Honey Sweet Rolls included wheat germ and yeast, some brands of which contain gluten. The recipe appeared on Page 18 of the magazine.
    Publix's swift and decisive action to correct the mistake shows a strong level of commitment to gluten-free consumers.
    The letter to print subscribers said that "the recipe for Orange-Honey Sweet Rolls, which appears on page 18, calls for the use of gluten-free flour as an ingredient; however, the complete recipe was not intended to be gluten-free. In fact, the recipe includes ingredients which contain gluten, therefore, it is not suitable for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance."
    Publix operates 1,039 stores in the Southeast, including GreenWise Markets in Palm Beach Gardens and Boca Raton, Florida.
    Source:

    http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/publix-recalls-magazine-over-gluten-free-gaffe-1907091.html

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/09/2012 - Subway stores in Oregon are in the process of rolling out gluten-free sandwich buns and gluten-free brownies as regular menu items statewide, according to Subway spokesperson Cathie Ericson.
    For millions of Americans who avoid gluten, due to celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating out can be a constant challenge. Having easy access to a safe, tasty, low-cost gluten-free sandwich is like the Holy Grail for some of those folks. For many, being able to grab a gluten-free Subway sandwich would be a major step toward vanquishing the challenges of eating gluten-free.
    Subway understands that being gluten-free "…really cuts down on fast-casual dining options, particularly sandwiches,” said Michele Shelley, Subway board member and owner.
    Many people were excited to read about Subway's early testing of gluten-free products in selected areas. Many were equally excited to hear about Subway's commitment to getting their gluten-free sandwich offerings right, from start to finish.
    For example, Subway’s wheat-free sandwich rolls and brownies are produced in a dedicated gluten-free facility and are individually packaged. Subway staffers are trained to prevent cross-contamination during the sandwich-making process.
    Moreover, a single employee will prepare a gluten-free sandwich order from start to finish. Other features to Subway's gluten-free process include single-use knives and eliminating contact between traditional sandwich rolls and other ingredients including meat, cheese and vegetables.
    Oregon is one of a handful of states where Subway first tested gluten-free products in selected areas. The current statewide roll out in Oregon comes after a successful test in Bend and Portland, Subway restaurants, and seems to signal Subway's desire to offer gluten-free menus to diners.
    “Subway is known for being a leader in healthy fare, and we are excited to embrace these gluten-free menu items for those who can benefit from them,” Shelley told reporters.
    Source:

    http://community.statesmanjournal.com/blogs/menumatters/2012/01/27/oregon-subways-add-gluten-free-menu-options/

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/02/2013 - There really hasn't been too much research into gluten levels of products labeled and sold as 'gluten-free in the U.S. A team of researchers recently set out to try to get an idea of gluten levels in food being labeled and sold as 'gluten-free.'
    The good news is that that vast majority of gluten-free foods sampled in their small study were, in fact, gluten-free, and many registered detectable gluten levels far below the 20 ppm allowed by law.
    The research team tested three different samples of 112 separate products, for a total of 336 packages tested. They tested each sample twice, for a total of 672 extractions.
    Of the 112 products tested, 36 products (32%) were certified gluten-free by either the Gluten Free Certification Organization (32 products) or the Celiac Sprue Association (4 products). Only four products (i.e., bread, hot cereal, tortilla, cookie) from three manufacturers tested at or above 20 ppm gluten. Three of these products were not certified gluten-free; one product was certified gluten-free.
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    Overall, 97.5 percent of extractions tested below 20 ppm gluten. Of the extractions in compliance, 93% tested below 5 ppm gluten, which is the lower limit of quantification for the assay used.
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    Gluten-free consumers can take comfort in the knowledge that the vast majority of manufacturers who are designating food as gluten-free are complying with the FDA’s labeling rule.
    Source:
    www.medicine.virginia.edu

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/14/2014 - A 43-year-old UK mother of two, who turned up at a hospital complaining of severe stomach cramps, first thought she was suffering a case of "acute wheat intolerance," until doctors told her that she was in fact pregnant and in labor. The woman, Teresa Howard, had no idea that she was expecting the son she delivered just hours later.
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    Until now, Howard says, she was one of those people who definitely wondered how any woman could fail to realize she was carrying a baby until she was actually delivering it.
    For her part, Howard said, she thought she had just gained some weight by over-snacking and being a bit sedentary, and had been working out to tone up in the weeks before giving birth.
    Source:
    Daily Mail

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    Roxanne Bracknell
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
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    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
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    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
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    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
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    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com