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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    GLUTEN-FREE FISH STICKS KEEP BRITAIN'S OLDEST DOG HAPPY AND HEALTHY


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 12/11/2014 - A pampered a Jack Russell terrier is being hailed as Britain’s oldest dog after reaching the ripe old age of 25 years, and gluten-free fish fingers are among the foods that keep her happy and healthy.


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    Photo: SWNS/The Daily MailThe dog, called Meg, eats whatever she likes theses days, says owner David Abrahams, of Stoke St Michael, Somerset, and that includes roast dinners, gluten-free fish fingers and Peppa Pig-shaped spaghetti in tomato sauce.

    Of course, the pasta includes gluten, so Meg’s diet is not gluten-free, but Abrahams says, the “fish fingers and the Peppa Pig pasta have helped her along the way.”

    Read the whole story at The Daily Mail.

    Does your dog get gluten-free food or treats as part of its diet? How about your cat? Share your gluten-free pet stories below.



    Image Caption: Photo: SWNS/The Daily Mail
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  • Related Articles

    Wendy Cohan
    Celiac.com 08/28/2008 - Gluten intolerance can affect all the mucous membranes of the body in sensitive individuals, including the bladder lining.  I was diagnosed in 1996 with an incurable, progressive, painful disease called interstitial cystitis.  The symptoms mimic those of a bad bladder infection, although most lab tests are negative for bacteria, and antibiotics generally do not help.  I knew as a nurse how the bladder functions, and that it needs to have an intact lining to tolerate holding all the toxic wastes of the body prior to elimination.  It made sense to me to try a dietary approach, and I had good luck immediately by excluding from my diet known bladder irritants like tomatoes, caffeine, chocolate, citrus, and alcohol, even though most doctors at the time gave diet little credit for a reduction in symptoms.   Nevertheless, the disease did progress over time, and I eventually needed to take pain medications, anti-spasmodics, and other medications to enable me to function.  Every urine test showed that I had significant amounts of blood in my urine.  No one ever tested me for food allergies, gluten intolerance, or considered any other possible cause.  No one suggested that my symptoms were part of a systemic dysfunction in my body.  I had a painful disease, and they would give me as much pain medicine as I wanted, but there was no cure.
    I was no longer getting enough sleep to enable me to function well as a nurse.  I made the choice to stop working for a few years to concentrate on rebuilding my health.  I was in constant pain.  It was about this time that I began turning to alternative practitioners for help, and started experimenting with my diet, as well as having food allergy and sensitivity testing done.  I had some success eliminating the swelling in my pelvic area using castor oil packs, enough so that when I had increased swelling from eating a particular food, I could tell the difference.  Careful observation showed me what did and did not negatively affect my bladder.  Eliminating gluten resolved a long-standing rash on my legs, called dermatitis herpetiformis, and after about two years and a lot of alternative bodywork, my bladder began to significantly recover.  It was the first area to show symptoms, and the last to recover.
    Now, twelve years after my interstitial cystitis diagnosis, my urologist readily agrees that gluten negatively affects the bladder in some portion of her patients, and that eliminating gluten leads to a reduction in symptoms. All of my urine tests are perfectly normal and I sleep at night.  Still, there are almost no published journal articles linking gluten intolerance and the bladder. I am trying to get the word out there, specifically, the idea that we do not have to live with constant pain, and that what we eat can affect our health.
    My future goals include beginning an informal clinical trial in the form of a support group for patients willing to try a gluten-free diet as a treatment for chronic bladder symptoms.  If anyone is interested in the link between bladder symptoms and gluten sensitivity, I have pages of anecdotes gathered from many people who have experienced healing on a gluten-free diet.

    The Connection Between Bladder Symptoms And Gluten Sensitivity - A Collection Of Personal Experiences*
    *Names have been changed to initials to protect individualsprivacy.The author has the originalweb-posts or other identifying information. A summary of web posts from icpuzzle@yahoogroups.com and intersitialcystitischronicpain@yahoogroups.com and personal communications revealing strong evidence of a connection between bladder symptoms and gluten sensitivity. This article is an adjunct/follow-up to the above article on gluten sensitivity and bladder disease.

    …”The main help came from W.’ssuggestion to try to eliminate wheat-barley-rye (gluten).The Elmiron was getting close it it’s maxwithout constantly abusing the situation with gluten…about three months ago Istarted eliminating gluten-carrying grains, “wallah” absolutely the mostsignificant change started happening about 3 or 4 days from the last day ofgluten.  How much better am I now sincethen – about 500% better (close to where I was when I first noticed the IC,even though I didn’t know what was happening – close to TWENTY YEARS AGO).  I am still of the opinion that some kind ofcritters have and maybe still play a part of this.  I have taken every kind of antibiotic, with alittle success now and then, but not enough to kill it.” “It took about 3 months to seemild improvement, about a year to see moderate improvement, and about 2 yearsto feel much better.  I am not 100percent symptom free, but most of the time I am a very manageable level ofsymptoms, and when I flare (from diet or sex) it is very short lived.I am down to one Elmiron a day (from theoriginal dose of 3) and I also do a gluten and sugar free version of the ICdiet, which I also think has helped me a lot.” “I have had IC for 30 yearspretty severely.  It was only this pastyears that I got tested …and found out I had a severe wheat-gluten allergy tothe point that I cannot ingest one bite of anything with wheat or gluten…theysaid my whole digestive tract was inflamed…Over the years I knew I was wheat,dairy, and sugar intolerant but these (latest) tests are more specific and letyou know the levels.  I feel muchstronger and have many days when I am symptom free.  I finally feel different.” “I have started cutting wheat andgluten out of my diet, its been about 2 weeks now.  I, like M., have IBS.  I am feeling better every day.I am following a diet very similar toyours.Thank you for posting it again!” “I have had IC for over adecade.  I have been on a gluten freediet for over 6 years and that has been the only thing that has given me anyrelief from the IC.  I no longer take anymeds at all – haven’t even been to a doctor for the IC in several years.Glad to hear someone else is seeing thebenefits of the gluten-free diet for IC and getting the word out.  I would definitely suggest anyone with ICgive it a try.  It definitely gave me mylife back." “Where have you been for the lasttwenty plus years?You may have saved mylife.I have described these symptomsfor years to doctors and never got an answer that sounded even close to whatwas happening.  Just “try these antibiotics”once in a while at the beginning (there was minimal change), but more and morethe antibiotics got more and more expensive with less and less effect if any atall, it even included the kill-all antibiotic – kills everything except me…Went to nerve doctor ($2,500 plus, pelvic x-rays (2 or 3 types).One of the urologists… never said anythingbut “prostatitis” over and over again. My head now also has a nearperfectly clear thinking ability, before it was always a bit cloudy even thoughI may not have been totally aware of it.The feel of carrying extra weight is now almost gone. The gluten issue may not be theonly issue I have – prostatitis is likely to be part of the pain problem, butthere is no question that the gluten issue has been a very, very large part andis now subsiding.” “I was tested for glutenintolerance but it came out negative but while I awaited results I went gluten free and I felt so goodI never went back.  I have had a lot ofimprovement going gluten and sugar free as well.I can find rice pasta, lasagna etc.easily.  It’s amazing how you don’t haveto try hard to substitute (for) it.” “I have gone from having to gowith urgency every 5 to 10 minutes and being in constant pain (especially atnight) to having almost no symptoms.   I am not “cured”.  I am still working on healing.  I occasionally have a mild flare.  Gradually I am able to add foods back into mydiet – a very different diet than before.  Whole foods, more veggies, only whole grains (no wheat), no sugar, and anoverall more alkaline diet….There is help.  There is hope.” “I am just into the first severalchapters of the book (Solving the IC Puzzle, by Amrit Willis, R.N.), but wantedto stop and ask if there were any people who were celiac or gluten intolerant thatalso suffer from IC.  In my celiacsgroup, there are quite a few that have celiacs that (also) have IC.Autoimmune – allergy – poor lifestyle choices– toxic body – all related.  So, I amwondering if there are others in this IC group that are glutenintolerant/celiacs or who have suffered from, have, or have healed fromautoimmune diseases…” “I have celiac disease also.  I was diagnosed via a blood test about 4months before the IC thing came to a head.  I disregarded the doctor’s warning to stay away from gluten/wheat.I went to a gastroenterologist because I feltlike I was having a stomach flu every 2 weeks.  So I saw this guy and he gave me the blood test results (which Iignored) until finally, I felt so bad I decided to whit the gluten/wheat.I had a friend who has celiac really severelyand she told me that I might as well cancel my hydrodistention to test for ICbecause eliminating wheat/gluten might clear everything up for me.  Unfortunately, I had thehydrodistention which made me much worse, IC-wise….Sorry for the long-windedanswer.I finally stopped taking theElmiron…So far so good.I really don’texpect to have a problem.  It was justhard letting go.  I don’t know which came first(the celiac or the IC).Looking back,every time I drank beer I always felt bloated right away.  Classic example, on our way to skiing, wewould stop for two beers.  Relievingmyself before getting back in the car, I would be dying for the bathroom beforewe reached our destination, 45 minutes later.  I though this was normal.Isuppose it was the celiac and IC kicking in. Too bad it would take 10 years and 3 pregnancies later to diagnose it…” “I have been diagnosed withgluten sensitivity and am gluten-free.  Since I was already eating very little in the way of grains at mynutritionist’s urging, I don’t find the diet that difficult to follow.I try to be very careful.” “I agree with these 2 types ofpastas.  I also find that when I eatwheat (which is an allergy I have) that my bladder gets irritated…” “…So, W. your IC is totally goneright now – especially after cutting out gluten?  I have known for years and years that I wasgluten sensitive as whenever I wouldn’t eat gluten or wheat, if I just atevegetables and protein my stomach would be soooo quiet.Hindsight is 20/20 – just wish I would havegiven up gluten years ago and maybe this wouldn’t have happened.  I am checking into pelvic floortherapy and will have that done along with many other things – I am soterrified of this getting worse, absolutely scared to death.  Thanks for your words ofencouragement and comfort.” (Personal Communication)“Suddenly some of the mysteriesof what's been called my "wheat intolerance"or "allergy" were resolved.  In particular, I no longer thinkI'm crazy for suspecting a link between my 2.5-year-long urinary tract infection and the onset of my moreobviously wheat-related symptoms. Thanks so much for getting theword out, and sharing your experience!” (Personal Communication) “I about fell off my chair when Iread about your bladder stuff.  I've seen 3 specialists (including adigestive doc and a urologist!!), a regular PCP, and a naturopath, andnone of them were willing to consider a link between wheat issues and my poorbladder's troubles. It was like the world lifted offmy shoulders - I'm not crazy!  And my body is not the wreck I thought itwas at the ripe old age of 31!Seems funny to be exultant aboutprobably having celiac disease, but that's whatI've been since.”

    Wendy Cohan
    Celiac.com 03/02/2009 - Many people suffer symptoms of fatigue prior to being diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.  For some, fatigue is a major reason for initially seeking medical attention.  In both Celiac disease and gluten intolerance, malabsorption of nutrients can result in weakness, lack of energy, and even iron-deficiency anemia.  Iron-deficiency anemia can be compounded by gynecological conditions, especially in peri-menopause.
    A thorough physician will test for and sometimes treat underlying vitamin and mineral deficiencies common in malabsorption disorders such as celiac disease and gluten intolerance, and after three-to-six months, many symptoms related to such deficiencies will resolve.  Some alternative practitioners even offer injectables such as B-Vitamins and Magnesium.  Oral supplements range from plant-based liquid concentrates, to sublingual drops, to tablets and capsules, allowing a range of options for sensitive individuals.
    Recently I spoke to a gluten intolerance group where a woman raised an important question.  She described her symptoms, which included profound fatigue and asked, “What can you do if extreme fatigue persists on a strict gluten free diet and supplements, even after a year or two?”  At the time, I wasn’t sure how to answer her, other than to suggest, off the top of my head, that she ask her Naturopath to do a saliva-based adrenal function panel.  I guess my reasons for doing so were based on fifteen years of nursing experience and the fact that she was probably about my age, and possibly in peri-menopause, which I knew places an additional strain on the adrenals.
    In women the sex hormones are produced in varying amounts in both the ovaries and adrenal glands.  A smooth transition through menopause would involve a gradual transition that decreased production of sex hormones by the ovaries, and increased production of sex hormones by the adrenal glands.  But, what happens if there are other factors in a woman’s life that prevent the adrenals from assuming this additional burden?  Coupled with the added strain that menopause places on the body and indirectly on the adrenals, a triggering event like a significant accidental gluten exposure, an increase in food allergies, or infection with a virus or bacterial illness, could simply tax the adrenals beyond their ability to meet this increased demand.
    The Gluten Connection
    Although relatively tiny, the adrenals have a very big job.  Adequate levels of the adrenal hormone cortisol are required by the body to help prevent inflammation and tissue destruction, keep blood sugars level, moderate nervous system responses, and attempt to maintain homeostasis, or the steady-state of balance in the body.    Periodically experiencing incredibly painful episodes of inflammation and tissue destruction from an accidental exposure to gluten, the protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, places a huge strain on the adrenals, including a sudden demand for high cortisol levels to help moderate the inflammatory response.  Each time, the body is able to cope, but with each experience it may take longer for the adrenals to recover.  When stress is prolonged, these high levels of cortisol must be maintained.  And if there is no significant recovery period during which the adrenals can rest and replenish themselves, adrenal fatigue results.
    After doing some research for a new book I’m working on, I found another possible connection, especially for those with celiac disease.  Many of us are aware of the strong, well-documented association between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disorders like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.  We also know there is a relationship between celiac disease and another endocrine gland, the pancreas.  (Diabetes has a strong correlation with celiac disease.)  Autoimmune hepatitis affects the liver – the body’s largest internal organ. Nephropathy, which affects the kidneys, is a very serious, less familiar disorder linked to celiac disease.  But, we rarely hear about the adrenals, especially in relation to celiac disease. Could there be a connection?  In fact, there are several important connections that are often over-looked.
    In researching autoimmune disorders, I learned about a disorder called “Autoimmune Adrenal Hypofunction” or “Autoimmune Hypo-Adrenalism”, which sometimes occurs together with other autoimmune disorders.  As in other autoimmune disorders, the body produces antibodies targeted against its own tissues, in this case, the two walnut-sized adrenal glands that sit atop the kidneys.  While thought to be relatively uncommon, Autoimmune Hypo-Adrenalism is most closely associated with celiac disease.  In fact, I was quite surprised by the wealth of information on this association, based on many studies done in Italy and Ireland, both countries where celiac disease is common.  While the connection between other autoimmune disorders and celiac disease is generally accepted in the U.S., the case for adrenal insufficiency in relation to celiac disease has not appeared to have received as much attention.  So, it can’t hurt to mention this link here, since it has the potential to affect those with persistent fatigue and/or chronic inflammatory disorders such as interstitial cystitis, in which low cortisol levels may play an important role.

    Stress, Food Allergies, and Nutrition
    As anyone who has studied stress and the allergenic response knows, diet does matter.  One of the least recognized forms of stress is untreated or unidentified food allergies and sensitivities. 
    In Dr. Wilson’s book, “Adrenal Fatigue – the 21st Century Stress Syndrome”, he writes, “It has long been observed that people suffering from adrenal fatigue have a definite increase in allergic responses or become allergic to things that did not previously bother them.” This is because levels of the adrenal hormone cortisol, the most powerful anti-inflammatory substance in the body drop, making it “more likely that the body will have severe allergic (inflammatory) reactions and that these reactions will be more severe.”
    Another factor in adrenal function through is nutritional status.  As we know, many people with Celiac disease or gluten intolerance do have some underlying nutritional deficiencies, and these become more difficult to address as we age.  Certain vitamins and minerals are essential to replenishing and nourishing the adrenal glands.  Ideally, we’d obtain these essential nutritional components through our diet.  In cases of adrenal fatigue, it is important to discuss with your physician what you can do to help your adrenals recover, both by eating an ideal diet, and taking recommended supplements, including B-Vitamins, Vitamin C, Magnesium, and specific herbs and amino acids.
    Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue
    Ten relatively common symptoms of adrenal fatigue are listed below:

    Fatigue Depression and memory difficulties Sleep Disturbances Migraine Headache An increase in allergies or the development of new allergies Alcohol Intolerance Low Blood Pressure and Low Body Temperature Blood Sugar Regulation Problems (Hypoglycemia) Low Libido & Hormonal Imbalances Inflammation

    Adrenal TestingTesting for adrenal insufficiency isn’t rocket-science, but an established and useful diagnostic tool that might have important implications for poor regulation of inflammation as well as for general health.
    The first step is to check for a low cortisol level, in combination with other hormones, including DHEA, Progesterone, Estrogen, and Testosterone.  This is easily done with a safe, reliable, and cost-effective serial saliva test, with four samples taken at specified time periods throughout the day.  Your physician often stocks these kits in the office, and can provide one for you to use and then mail to the laboratory.  The laboratory will perform the tests, and send the results to your physician, who will discuss them with you.  The whole process takes a week or two, and can be repeated every few months to track your recovery.  It is not expensive, and may even be covered by your insurance.
    In fact, you do not need a doctor to order the test, but the results will be of little value without a physician to interpret them, make a plan to address any abnormal findings, and support and monitor you in your treatment.
    Blood tests, including and ACTH challenge, may be indicated, but a serial saliva test is a good first step.
    Adrenal Recovery
    Any program of adrenal recovery must incorporate lifestyle changes that include avoiding stress or dealing with stress in healthy ways, such as exercise, relaxation, and meditation.  Eating an anti-inflammatory diet, free of sugars and alcohol, is essential, as continuing to follow a strict gluten-free diet.

    This article is partially excerpted from “The Better Bladder Book – a Holistic Approach to Healing Interstitial Cystitis & Chronic Pelvic Pain through Diet, Lifestyle, & Self-Treatment”, available soon through my website.  The book provides documentation for all research and factual content, including the information in this article.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/30/2011 - In a first of its kind study, a team of researchers is attempting a global estimate of the burden of celiac disease in childhood, and to to determine what role childhood celiac disease might play in global mortality due to diarrhea.
    The research team included Peter Byass, Kathleen Kahn, and Anneli Ivarsson. They are affiliated with the Umeå Centre for Global Health Research, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Umeå University in Umeå, Sweden, and with the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences at University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.
    In the last several decades, celiac disease has become an an increasingly recognized public health problem. More recently, celiac disease has emerged as a global earth issue, in spite scant globally representative epidemiological data.
    Because children with celiac disease often have chronic diarrhea and malnutrition, a proper diagnosis is often missed, especially in poorer settings, where water-borne infectious diarrheas are common, and many children fail to thrive.
    To make their assessment, the two used available data to build a basic model of childhood celiac disease, incorporating estimates of population prevalence, probability of non-diagnosis, and likelihood of mortality among undiagnosed children of all countries from 1970 to 2010.
    In their paper, the two state the assumptions underlying their model, and make the model available as a supplementary file.
    Based on their model, in 2010 there were around 2.2 million children under 5 years of age living with celiac disease, while each year, there would be about 42,000 deaths related to celiac disease in these children. That would mean that, in 2008, deaths related to celiac disease likely totaled about 4% of all childhood diarrhea deaths worldwide.
    Even if celiac disease accounts for only a small proportion of global diarrhea deaths, these deaths are preventable, but not by normal diarrhea treatment, which can often involve gluten-based food supplements.
    They also note that, as other causes of diarrhea mortality decline, celiac disease will become a proportionately greater problem unless clinicians begin to try gluten-free diets for children with chronic diarrhea and malnutrition.
    Source:

    PLoS One. 2011; 6(7): e22774. doi:  10.1371/journal.pone.0022774

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 12/22/2014 - Is your child sneaking a bite here and there off his or her needed gluten-free diet? You should know not only for the health of your child but to also ensure there are no other issues you need to help address, such as an allergy to nuts or dairy which can cause other issues. As a parent we need to stay on top of things to get to the bottom of any “unresolved” issues in their little bodies. If your child has been diagnosed with celiac disease, it’s critical that he or she follows a diet 100% free of gluten. Alarmingly, according to Celiac.com, 43% of celiacs cheat on their gluten-free diet, and 13% cheat 20-40 times per year or more for various reasons.
    One of the reasons children may cheat on their diet is because they don’t have substitutes for their favorite gluten-containing foods. Have a talk with your child about the gluten-containing meals, snacks, and desserts he or she craves and misses and make sure there are plenty of gluten-free versions of these foods available at all times, especially over the holidays.
    Another reason celiac children may cheat on their diet is because eating gluten doesn’t make them feel sick. It’s important to sit down with your celiac child and have a heart-to-heart talk about how even though your child doesn’t feel sick, gluten is still wreaking havoc on the villi of the intestines which in turn can lead to very serious health conditions such as infertility and gastrointestinal cancer. You may want to include your child’s doctor or nutritionist in this discussion.
    Lastly, get your child excited and proud to be gluten-free. Have your celiac child join a local celiac children’s group to stay motivated and feel “normal” and connected to others with the same dietary restrictions. Pick out special gluten-free recipes to make for dinner or dessert. Attend a gluten-free cooking class together. There are many ways to his or her celiac pride.
    Your child won’t be tempted to cheat when you make this recipe!
    Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies
    This is the original Toll House recipe, halved because I don’t want to make so many cookies. These are really delicious!
    Ingredients:
    A heaping 1 ¾ cup rice flour or gluten-free flour mix ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 stick shortening, Earth Balance, or butter ½ cup brown sugar ¼ cup white sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 egg ½ package gluten-free chocolate chips Nuts (optional) Directions:
    Preheat oven to 375F degrees. Mix sugars and shortening or butter until creamy. Beat in egg, then dry ingredients except chocolate chips and nuts, if using. Once smooth, add chips and nuts and roll into balls. Flatten slightly. Bake 8-10 minutes. Let cool on cookie sheets. Remove and eat or store in an airtight container. Enjoy!  NOTE: You may replace the egg with egg replacer or applesauce to make them vegan.
    Resources:
    About.com: Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Die About.com: Don’t Let These Problems Derail Your Gluten-Free Diet Celiac.com: The Gluten-Free Diet: Curse or Cure? 

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    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764