• Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   13 Members, 0 Anonymous, 422 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/18/2009 - Little did the parents of 17-year-old Brianna Rice realize that her February diagnosis for celiac disease would make her into a poster child for insurance reform. That's because when Brianna was first diagnosed, she was covered by health insurance. Thanks to some extra scrutiny by her insurance company, that is no longer the case.


    In the months following her diagnosis, Brianna's insurance company, American Community Mutual Insurance, took a microscope to her medical records and canceled her policy after it ruled that her parents had lied on her application last November.

 American Community not only canceled her policy, effective in May, but also denied coverage all the way back to November 1st, 2008, the day Brianna's coverage began.
    After Brianna was diagnosed with celiac disease in February, American Community initiated a review of her medical files and found instances of dizziness, elevated cholesterol levels, ongoing fatigue and a persistent cough. The family received a letter from American Community dated 12 May announcing their choice to rescind coverage.


    The letter stated that "coverage you applied for would not have been issued for Brianna if we had known this medical history at the time of application."
    

Dale Rice claims the firm cherry-picked the instances from different doctors' visits, and that Brianna had no ongoing health issues. He noted the dizziness to was due to a brief bout with dehydration, the fatigue a result of Brianna staying up late surfing online, and the elevated cholesterol due to an inaccurate test, and said her cough was short-lived.
    
The Rices insist they were honest and forthcoming on Brianna's application and say American Community is trying to back out of covering their daughter because of the February diagnosis.

American Community claims it would not have granted coverage based on Brianna's full medical record.
    
The Rices have lodged a complaint with the Illinois Department of Insurance. "We are livid," said Dale Rice, who, along with his wife, is out of work. "When a private insurer gets legitimate claims and seeks to find excuses not to pay them, they are clearly demonstrating morally and ethically bankrupt behavior."
    Insurance companies look for "anything that they could say 'you didn't tell us about,'" says Rice. "They hope that people just lay down and die and don't fight."
    The Rices are not alone. The director of the Illinois Department of Insurance, Michael McRaith, notes that his department has investigated about 400 rescission-related cases industry-wide since 2005. He calls the rate at which customers have complained about American Community 'alarming,' and calls American Community Mutual's rescission numbers 'cause for concern.' 


    The family's situation shows just how quickly health insurance problems can lead to financial ruin. With their daughter's unpaid medical bills exceeding $20,000 and mounting, the Rices fear losing their home. Brianna's mother, Pat Rice says she has liquidated some of her retirement account to pay bills.


    "The next step is really bankruptcy," her husband said.
    This story should strike a nerve with everyone who has celiac disease, or knows someone who does. I wonder how many people with celiac disease might risk cancellation of their insurance if they lost their jobs?  How many people who obtain insurance in good faith, and later find they have celiac disase, risk being with a 'pre-existing' condition label? It seems to me that a crafty insurance company could make an argument that nearly all celiac disease is 'pre-existing,' especially in older people.
    Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.
    Source: Chicago Tribune


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/09/2011 - The Publix supermarket company recently pulled its fall issue of Publix GreenWise Market magazine, because it included a recipe that was erroneously labeled as 'gluten-free.'
    The company also announced plans to mail a follow-up warning about the recipe to print subscribers.
    The recipe for Orange-Honey Sweet Rolls included wheat germ and yeast, some brands of which contain gluten. The recipe appeared on Page 18 of the magazine.
    Publix's swift and decisive action to correct the mistake shows a strong level of commitment to gluten-free consumers.
    The letter to print subscribers said that "the recipe for Orange-Honey Sweet Rolls, which appears on page 18, calls for the use of gluten-free flour as an ingredient; however, the complete recipe was not intended to be gluten-free. In fact, the recipe includes ingredients which contain gluten, therefore, it is not suitable for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance."
    Publix operates 1,039 stores in the Southeast, including GreenWise Markets in Palm Beach Gardens and Boca Raton, Florida.
    Source:

    http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/publix-recalls-magazine-over-gluten-free-gaffe-1907091.html

    Lauren Lindsey
    Celiac.com 12/11/2013 - The most wondrous season is upon us. The family gathers to create memories and cherish each moment of the holidays. Wait…wait…what?? With family?@#$?!
    We often emerge from these gatherings planning the next appointment with our therapist. No need to guess how it'll go this year: Mom locked herself in the bedroom with a bottle of wine again. Grandma has no reservations pointing out that you're still single. Your cousin whom suffers from chronic ‘one up syndrome' is compelled to interject conversations failing to encompass their exceeding significance.  
    There are circumstances and people we cannot change. Your family may not exemplify the magical fuzziness of a Thomas Kinkade painting but so what. What we can take control over is our well-being and attitude. Despite being thrust into drama comparable to a Kardashian marriage, let's focus on our diet. Managing celiac disease is exhausting enough without the added stress from the holidays. With the influx of food, there are more chances that forbidden goodies will bombard their way to the dinner plate. But don't sweat it. Consider the following tips to ease you celiac disease concerns and have one less thing to worry about this season. You'll need the energy for breaking up temper-mantrums over fantasy football scores and equipping the fire extinguisher for the first turkey fry attempt. 
    Eat before you arrive: Never walk into an occasion hungry. There are few worse mood killers than discovering carrot sticks are the only gluten-free item in the room. The hunger will also hinder your inhibitions, tempting to eat something you normally wouldn't.  Otherwise, you must wait to eat once the night is over. As nice as you look scowling over the abandoned vegetable tray and dragging your date out of door, I'm certain there are more enticing activities to engage in.
    Bring your own dish: Coordinate with the host beforehand to avoid confusion about portions. Consider bringing enough for others to try as well. Take the opportunity to share with family and loved ones. After all, you've spent the past year meticulously creating and photographing Pinterest worthy meals. Show them what those eight albums dedicated to food are all about.
    Help with cooking:  Cooking a gluten-free meal may seem easy enough to the uninformed individual. Although the cook has good intentions, their lack in experience with intricate details of the diet may lead to contamination. Insist upon helping even if your offer is declined. This way you can ensure the safety of the meal. Surely, any helping hand with cooking and cleaning duties will be appreciated.
    Label your food: It only takes one serving spoon dipped into the crunchy green bean casserole to contaminate your food. Set aside a table for a buffet clearly labeled "do not contaminate" and "gluten-free," etc., on the dishes. Better yet, don't put them out with everything else. There's a chance your food will mistakenly be eaten or contaminated within the vicinity of hungry mouths and gluten-filled goodies.
    Don't be afraid to say NO:   Your peachy little grandma, the one who spends the remainder of the year shuffling to the living room for afternoon soap operas has impeccably presented a homemade turkey dinner with all the fixins. Wow grandma, we didn't know you had it in you… Desserts, sides, more desserts, all made from scratch from her mother's, mother's, mother's recipes (she will then spend the next half hour monopolizing conversation regarding how easy we kids have it). None of which are gluten-free since, regardless of your various efforts, Grandma doesn't know what gluten means. The moral of the story: despite it being the super bowl of family dinners in your grandma's world, you must decline the meal. Politely of course but don't be afraid of assertion. Many people do not understand reasoning behind diet restrictions and some will never accept them. There are other ways to show Grandma she is loved and appreciated besides eating her food.
    When in doubt go without: It's always better to pass on a dish when the ingredients remain unclear. If you must ask yourself, "I don't know if I should eat this" and there's no way to confirm its safety, the answer is do not eat it. This is particularly difficult but worth avoiding the undoing of your well-being. You'll beat yourself up while gripping the toilet at your significant other's childhood home as their newly acquainted relative repeatedly knocks behind the door asking if you're ok.
    Avoid over indulging: "Well, since it's the holidays I guess it's alright to have this cupcake, a piece of pie, and chocolate cake." Special occasions are used as justification for eating things we normally wouldn't. We tend to overeat at these gatherings because food sits in front of us, not because we're hungry. Remember, 20 parts per million of gluten are permitted in gluten-free certified products. Eating multiple items compile trace amounts of gluten, posing for a likely reaction. Consider sticking to only one gluten-free product with your meal. The gluten-free biscuits, stuffing, corn bread, and apple pie all look delicious but choose one of those. Otherwise, the spandex pants of shame are ready to waddle through your food hangover tomorrow.
    Communicate with the host and guests: Simply informing the host and cook beforehand may prevent unwanted mishaps. There will be guests who show excitement in trying new dishes and wish to hear your sentiments regarding diet. Share your honest thoughts and opinions without coming across critical of their personal choices. Other guests may not be so willing to converse topics concerning diet or health but don't take offense. Remember, the diet is not simply a fad that you're following. Your life, health, and well-being depend on it and people need to know that.
    Limit your alcohol: Most parties mean food and booze. Since party food is rarely gluten-free, it's tempting to keep the wine and alcohol pouring in. Grab a glass of soda water and lime as your security blanket. You'll be surprised how efficiently this wards off needless drinks. It's easy to have one glass of wine here, one glass there, but then you're on glass number four. With little food in your stomach you will not be feeling too hot. Not to mention, the company Christmas party may not be the place for that extra glass. Your naughty elf impression may seem very original and hilarious at the time, but come Monday morning…not so much. 
    Mentally prepare yourself: Get your mind right. First, relax. Don't you just hate it when someone tells you to relax during a stressful situation? Truly though, getting worked up will exhaust you before the events even take place. Secondly, be prepared. There will be many tempting foods and opportunities to sabotage your diet. Be mindful and expectant of this beforehand. Lastly, think with a positive attitude. Bring the expectations down a notch and take it easy on yourself and others. Take on too much and be bothered by things outside of your control or choose to have a great holiday. (I'd go with the last choice- you deserve it).

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/09/2014 - Not much is known about costs associated with celiac disease. A team of Israeli researchers recently studied the costs in patients diagnosed with celiac disease. The research team included A.D. Heymann, M. Leshno, R. Endevelt, and R. Shamir of the Medical Division at Maccabi Healthcare Services in Tel Aviv, Israel.
    They conducted a retrospective case control study covering the period 2003-2006 in a large Israeli Health Maintenance Organization with over two million members. Their study group included 1,754 patients with celiac disease and a control group of 15,040 non-celiac patients. They calculated costs individually for each member, and aggregated costs according to main cost-branches.
    They conducted a linear step wise regression with costs as the dependent variable and age, gender and the presence of celiac disease as the independent variables. They then compared costs for patients with celiac disease with costs for patients suffering from other chronic diseases.
    The team found that the total costs of celiac disease patients were significantly higher than those for the control group for hospital admission, medications, laboratory and imaging. The overall hospital admission rate of celiac patients was 7.98% as opposed to 7.1% for the control group (p = 0.06). However, compared with other chronic illnesses, the costs of patients with celiac disease were similar to those of patients with diabetes and hypertension.
    This study does conclude that celiac disease patients do use more medical services than the general population, at rates likely higher than previously thought.
    Source:
    Health Econ Rev. 2013 Nov 7;3(1):23. doi: 10.1186/2191-1991-3-23.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au