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    Gluten-Free Marijuana Edibles Gaining Popularity


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Jonathunder

    Celiac.com 03/28/2014 - Great news for some celiac and gluten-intolerant folks in Colorado! Legal marijuana sales began in Colorado on Jan. 1, 2014, and new shop owners have been surprised to find a strong the market for marijuana edibles. More and more, makers of these edibles are including gluten-free selections.


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    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--JonathunderIn some ways, it seems both natural and inevitable that the rising retail market for gluten-free good and the rising retail market for edible cannabis products should overlap.

    That is what is happening now in Colorado. As marijuana retailers such to meet the demand for weed, they are also rushing to meet the demand for edible cannabis products.

    This, in turn, has many manufacturers across Colorado racing to bake, inject, spray and infuse marijuana into nearly every kind of edible form, with many taking steps to include gluten-free items among their products.

    Once relegated to regular marijuana ground up into cookies or brownies, the manufacture of edibles now entails bakers using concentrated extracts of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, marijuana's active ingredient), usually suspended oil, and then incorporated into foods ranging from cookies to mints and candies, olive oil, granola bars, chocolate truffles, spaghetti sauce, and marijuana-infused sodas in flavors like sparkling peach and sarsaparilla.

    Experts say edibles tend to give consumers a slightly different "high," because, instead of entering the lungs and moving directly into the bloodstream, the THC is first processed by the stomach and absorbed via the digestive system. The high takes longer to begin, is usually less intense, and longer lasting than with smoked cannabis.

    All edibles sold in Colorado's marijuana retail outlets are produced in commercial facilities. Many are labeled for potency. Commercial gluten-free products must follow FDA labeling guidelines for purity.

    Source:


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    Guest Jenny

    Posted

    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

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    Guest Taylor

    Posted

    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Jenny, I promise your children won't get their hands on any edibles unless they ask for them. Which they probably will when they are in high school. Sorry.

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    Guest Janus

    Posted

    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Jenny, YOU are the parent. It's up to YOU to police your own children. They're YOUR responsibility, and no one else's. And whose fault is it that you live with a "user?"

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    Guest Jefferson Adams

    Posted

    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Joke? Obviously you don't know anyone with cancer or the myriad other conditions that cannabis can help alleviate. As for kids, I guess we keep it out of their hands by smart regulation and common sense adult supervision, the same way we make sure your kids don't drink booze or smoke cigarettes.

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    Guest Logan

    Posted

    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Only way your children will get these is if they try really hard. No dispensary will ever sell to anyone under the age of 21. Simmer down please. You lived with one person who happened to abuse marijuana and let his or her life go down the tubes because they found cannabis more appealing than other things.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    The same way you make sure your kids don't accidentally take all the poisons the big pharma and their doctor friends are shoving down the throats of our people everyday? I suppose it is the same way you keep firearms away from a child or keep them from drowning and stuff like that! It's called being a responsible parent, hello!

     

    I'd bet your own "trusting" Dr. is probably giving your kid Ritalin or some other new poison to make sure he just sits in that chair and shuts up, and because of that problem the Doc has you on some little happy pills, some Ambien and than something to take for dry mouth you got from your mornings legal chemical cocktail...

     

    Watch Sanjay Gupta's Charlottes Web, imagine she was your child, education is the key...

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
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    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
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    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.