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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Gluten-Free Marijuana Edibles Gaining Popularity

    Caption: Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Jonathunder

    Celiac.com 03/28/2014 - Great news for some celiac and gluten-intolerant folks in Colorado! Legal marijuana sales began in Colorado on Jan. 1, 2014, and new shop owners have been surprised to find a strong the market for marijuana edibles. More and more, makers of these edibles are including gluten-free selections.

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--JonathunderIn some ways, it seems both natural and inevitable that the rising retail market for gluten-free good and the rising retail market for edible cannabis products should overlap.

    That is what is happening now in Colorado. As marijuana retailers such to meet the demand for weed, they are also rushing to meet the demand for edible cannabis products.

    This, in turn, has many manufacturers across Colorado racing to bake, inject, spray and infuse marijuana into nearly every kind of edible form, with many taking steps to include gluten-free items among their products.

    Once relegated to regular marijuana ground up into cookies or brownies, the manufacture of edibles now entails bakers using concentrated extracts of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, marijuana's active ingredient), usually suspended oil, and then incorporated into foods ranging from cookies to mints and candies, olive oil, granola bars, chocolate truffles, spaghetti sauce, and marijuana-infused sodas in flavors like sparkling peach and sarsaparilla.

    Experts say edibles tend to give consumers a slightly different "high," because, instead of entering the lungs and moving directly into the bloodstream, the THC is first processed by the stomach and absorbed via the digestive system. The high takes longer to begin, is usually less intense, and longer lasting than with smoked cannabis.

    All edibles sold in Colorado's marijuana retail outlets are produced in commercial facilities. Many are labeled for potency. Commercial gluten-free products must follow FDA labeling guidelines for purity.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Jenny, I promise your children won't get their hands on any edibles unless they ask for them. Which they probably will when they are in high school. Sorry.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Jenny, YOU are the parent. It's up to YOU to police your own children. They're YOUR responsibility, and no one else's. And whose fault is it that you live with a "user?"

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    Guest Jefferson Adams

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Joke? Obviously you don't know anyone with cancer or the myriad other conditions that cannabis can help alleviate. As for kids, I guess we keep it out of their hands by smart regulation and common sense adult supervision, the same way we make sure your kids don't drink booze or smoke cigarettes.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Only way your children will get these is if they try really hard. No dispensary will ever sell to anyone under the age of 21. Simmer down please. You lived with one person who happened to abuse marijuana and let his or her life go down the tubes because they found cannabis more appealing than other things.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    The same way you make sure your kids don't accidentally take all the poisons the big pharma and their doctor friends are shoving down the throats of our people everyday? I suppose it is the same way you keep firearms away from a child or keep them from drowning and stuff like that! It's called being a responsible parent, hello!

     

    I'd bet your own "trusting" Dr. is probably giving your kid Ritalin or some other new poison to make sure he just sits in that chair and shuts up, and because of that problem the Doc has you on some little happy pills, some Ambien and than something to take for dry mouth you got from your mornings legal chemical cocktail...

     

    Watch Sanjay Gupta's Charlottes Web, imagine she was your child, education is the key...

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Amy Leger
    Celiac.com 10/29/2008 - Equality.  That’s all any parent wants for his or her child.  In this case I’m talking about food at school.  Are you completely frustrated that you can’t get a gluten-free lunch for your child at school?   According to a recent survey by the American Celiac Disease Alliance, many parents of celiac children may feel the same way.  The survey conducted during the summer of 2008, found of 2,200 respondents, 90% had to regularly pack gluten-free lunches for their celiac child. I used to be one of them and was stuck feeling like I was banging my head against a wall trying to get a few hot lunches for my child.  That goal of equality saw me through a journey — years in the making — that would eventually pay off.
    Just before my celiac daughter’s kindergarten year began, I thought I covered all my bases.  I talked to the school nurse, Emma’s teacher, and the head of the cafeteria about her condition and her diet.  I found there was very little she could have at school except beef tacos, which she loved.  Eventually that one menu item, which made my daughter feel just like the rest of the kids, vanished; a near tragedy for her, sheer frustration for me.  I would ask myself “Why do the schools have to serve up so much food with gluten?” I also didn’t feel like I was taken seriously by the cafeteria employees.  I housed some small gluten-free food items in the freezer at school in case of emergency.  That expensive food was thrown away, with no one even realizing they did it.  That told me, they weren’t paying attention.  And I was done.  It seemed as though Emma was destined for cold lunches until she graduated from high school.  
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    Amy Leger
    Celiac.com 11/19/2008 - This year my husband and I took in Ida, an exchange studentfrom Norway, who needed a gluten-free home.We couldn’t help but be excited at the prospect to have someone else inthe house set an example for my 9-year-old gluten-free daughter.Ida (pronounced EE-dah) has quickly becomepart of the family. And of course one thing we talk about is food and thedifferences in gluten-free options here in the United States versus Norway.
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    When Ida first got here, I explained to her just howill-equipped most of our restaurants, and many of the people who work there,are regarding specialized diets.While McDonald'shas lists of their gluten-free items on line, many of the people taking ordersdo not understand the first thing about food sensitivities and allergies oreven about what their establishment has to offer.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/30/2012 - Rates of autoimmune disease are on the rise, and not just in the United States, with diseases like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and lupus being diagnosed in increasingly higher numbers.
    Rates of type 1 diabetes, for example, rose 23%, from 2001 to 2009, according to the American Diabetes Association, with a similar increase reported in Finland.
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    As science has helped eliminate worms from our bodies, once a common intestinal parasite, the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has gone from 1 in 10,000 people to one in 200.
    Deaths and complications from lupus are also on the rise.
    According to a new study published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, there was a significant increase in end-stage renal disease in young people over the period from 1995 to 2006. Of those with the condition, half were African American. In fact, blacks suffer end-stage renal disease at rates six to seven times greater than whites.
    Dr. Frederick Miller of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences agrees with Ladd. He also believes that the surge in autoimmune disease diagnosis likely has an environmental component.
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    Source:
    American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/11/2012 - Would you be surprised to learn that a number of naturally brewed soy sauces are technically gluten-free? I was.
    I was recently doing some research for a catered even and needed to make a decision about what kind of soy sauce to use in the food preparation. Since the Korean food being served required a great deal of soy sauce for marinating purposes, the hosts were concerned that gluten-free tamari might end up costing too much. However, the event included a number of folks who eat gluten-free, and the hosts did want to provide food that everyone could eat. So, what to do? The restaurant making the food uses Kikkoman. Is Kikkoman safe to serve to people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance?
    In an effort to answer that question, I did a bit of research. I was a bit surprised when my research led me to an interesting article on the naturally fermented soy sauce made by Kikkoman and Lima Foods, which are two major manufacturers of soy sauce.
    There are two ways to manufacture soy sauce. The first uses natural fermentation. The second uses chemical hydrolysis. Both methods will break down the complex proteins including gluten into smaller components such as amino acids and polypeptides.
    However, the soy sauces tested for the article were produced using natural fermentation. That's because chemically produced (or artificial) soy sauce is may contain toxic and carcinogenic components produced by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis.
    The article said that the soy sauces made by these companies actually met Codex Alimentarius standards for gluten-free foods, and that tests show their gluten content to be well under the 20ppm required for gluten-free products.
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    That means that the naturally fermented soy sauces that were tested meet gluten-free standards, and will likely not trigger adverse reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, especially considering the small daily quantities of soy sauce consumed.
    Anyone who does not trust this can, of course, choose soy sauces that do not contain any wheat to start with. Tamari soy sauces are typically produced without wheat, but some brands do not follow this tradition and are not wheat-free, so: Buyer beware.
    As for the catered event, after talking with the gluten-free guests, the hosts decided to go with traditional Kikkoman. They have not received any reports of illness or adverse reactions, even in the several people with high gluten-sensitivity.
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    Source:
    Soya.be LAB RESULTS

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    Okay, thanks. Re: MTHFR - I don't really know yet... I only started reading about it yesterday and it is pretty overwhelming. But it does seem to be common advice that if you have a close relative with it you should be tested, and I guess having 2 copies of the "C" variant, as my sister has, is the "worst" variety of it.  It came to light for her when she was going through infertility and miscarriages.  They discovered that her homocysteine was high, which led to the MTHFR testing. So that is one thing I know I would then want to proceed to do, if I do have it - get my homocysteine tested. My dad died of early-onset Alzheimer's, and apparently there is a link between high homocysteine as well as the MTHFR mutation and Alzheimer's. It also seems like it would be worth knowing if I have it since it could be the cause of my lower levels of B12. And I guess maybe I would need to start taking methyl-folate? I mean, to answer your question, I am not entirely sure what I will do if I do have it.   Probably read a lot more about it... and take supplements like methyl-folate if I really think I need to.  Check my homocysteine & control that if I need to, hopefully to lower my risk of Alzeheimer's.  It seems like a frustrating area because there appear to be limited official medical websites that really even talk much about it (so far).  I have found one article on the NIH that focuses on the link with high homocysteine. I already eat a very healthy diet.  Whole grains, lots of fruit & veg, mostly organic.  I am a vegetarian except for very rare seafood. I avoid processed food and, above all, foods with added sugar...  To me, sugar is by far the worst culprit in the SAD.  I think RA has been ruled out by my 2 negative Rheumatoid Factor tests (one done several years ago, one just this year at my physical).  Also, the way this started in my elbows, and was really only there for years, is just... weird... and definitely doesn't really fit with arthritis.  And there is no swelling to speak of, just mild pain - sometimes aching, sometimes burning, sometimes sharp...  It may or may not fit with any systemic diagnosis versus a mechanical one, but nowadays I do also have pain in my hands, feet, and knees.  So then I think, well maybe it is/was something systemic, but it was worse in my elbows for some mechanical reason but now has progressed elsewhere.  I thought Crohn's was just digestive?  (Of course, many people think that of celiac.)  So I haven't really investigated that one much. My ANA was retested and is back down to "negative," so I think that pretty much rules out lupus.  I believe fibromyalgia is still on the table. Anyhow....  Your point is nonetheless taken.  I do want to rule out celiac and go from there.  At this point I'd sure love to find out it is something I could control through my diet!
    Hello, I've been suffering abdominal issues for about two months now. I've been having minor pain and a lot of pressure in my left abdomen. It feels almost like someone is inflating a balloon on my left side from below the belly button to just below the ribs. At first my doctor diagnosed it as diverticulitis, and put me on antibiotics, however a CT scan was never done. I was advised to stuck to a liquid diet followed by soft foods. I did start to feel better so I tried eating some pasta and toast and started to feel the pain and pressure again. My doctor then put me on stronger antibiotics and had me go back to the liquid and soft foods diet. Again I started to feel better and added in pasta and toast. Just like the first time the pain and pressure came back. My doctor then ran more bloodwork looking for other problems, including TGG IGA and TGG IGG. The TGG IGA came back <1.2 (negative), the TGG IGG came back 8.3 weak positive. My doctor thought that could point to potential celiac and ordered two more tests to look for celiac (I'm not sure which tests) and advised me to cut out gluten while waiting for the results.  I started researching celiac a little bit which is how I ended up here. I found a few things interesting. In the past 15 years I was diagnosed and treated for IBS, acid reflux, and chronic daily headaches with migraines. From the little research I've done it looks like all those could potentially be related to celiac. I'm anxiously awaiting the results from the new bloodwork, and hoping that I may be on the road to recovery! 
    For like $100 more, add the DGP IgA test as well.  The EMA is expensive because it is labor intensive (lab), so consider skipping that test.   Why find out if you have the MTHFR gene?    What is that knowledge going to do for you?  I have probably have the MTHFR gene.  My B-12 and Folate used to be off the chart when I was consuming soy milk that was fortified with cheap unmethylated forms of vitamins.    (I used soy milk before my celiac diagnosis because I was lactose intolerant).  I ceased all vitamin supplements and dropped any foods that were enriched  (or you can purchase more expensive methylated versions if you want to supplement) and those levels dropped down to normal levels.  I found that If I ate a normal healthy and varied diet and healed from celiac disease, I do not need supplements.   It appears that I was not able to process unmethylated vitamins because I might the MTHFR gene.  Just a theory.   Knowing I have the gene?  What is that going to do for me?  Will it change my behavior or save me from a new illness?  Can my doctor formulate treatments based on that knowledge?  Can he manipulate my genes?  NOT YET.  This might be beneficial in the future, but science is not there yet.  Just lots of websites trying to sell you vitamins.  Believe me, I have a family full of Autistic family members, so the MTHFR topic is of interest to me. Consider ruling out celiac disease first, address other issues that can impact joints like RA or Crohn’s), then eat a healthy diet that may or may not include gluten or processed food.  I have a friend who is on week three of the Whole 30 diet.  She ruefully confessed that she is feeling so much better.  In a few weeks, she will add foods back in that might be giving her issues.  I think she realizes that her Standard American Diet is not the healthy way to go.  Although she is happy about feeling significantly better, she is sad because she knows that she is going to have to give up all that junk food which seems to be making her sick.  I hope she moves forward because good health is priceless.      
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