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    Gluten-Free Memorial Day Tips


    Destiny Stone
    Image Caption: Gluten-free Memorial Day (photo courtesy of Beverly & Pack)

    Memorial Day is fast approaching. Once known as, "Decoration Day", Memorial Day commemorates the men and women who have died while serving their Country during military service. Not only is Memorial Day a day of remembrance, it is also a day to spend quality time with your family and loved ones. Most Memorial Day activities center around a picnic, BBQ, or sporting events, so get ready to have a gluten-free Memorial Day!


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    If you are gluten sensitive, you will want to make sure your are included in the festivities by preparing gluten-free foods you can eat and share with others. Many of your favorite picnic and BBQ foods are naturally gluten-free, but the condiments and preparation of the dish is what can render your meal inedible. Remember to use gluten-free sauces for your marinades, and avoid using condiments that have been dipped into by gluten laden utensils, as cross contaminates are readily found in jars of mayonnaise and mustard. Keep yourself safe this year and make sure to have your own condiments when going to a group event. Many gluten sensitive people use squeeze tops for their condiments to avoid the proverbial "gluten contaminated knife in the condiments" routine. Included are some Memorial Day tips and recipes, but with a gluten-free twist.

    Hot Dogs are generally not gluten-free. The fillers they pump into hot dogs usually contain gluten or a sub-ingredient of gluten, such as caramel color, artificial colors or flavors, and even some spices. If you are a hot dog lover, don't despair, there are gluten-free hot dogs on the market. The link below is for all natural gluten-free buffalo hot dogs-check it out!
    Don't forget the buns! Being gluten-free doesn't mean you can't enjoy a bun like everyone else-just make sure your buns are gluten-free. You may want to abstain from grilling your buns on the BBQ if there are gluten products on the grill. Try toasting your buns in a clean toaster oven, or putting your buns on a piece of aluminum foil to avoid contamination. There are even some gluten-free buns on the market that are good enough to eat without toasting. The link below is a good place to start looking for gluten-free buns.
    Shish kabobs are an all-time favorite at any Memorial Day event. Shish kabobs are easy to make and gluten-free; just make sure to use gluten-free soy sauce and marinades for your kabobs. Here are some ideas for home made, low-fat, gluten-free Shish kabobs.

    Gluten-Free KabobsGluten-Free Citrus Tarragon Chicken Kabobs

    • 1 lemon, zested, then juiced, remainder discarded
    • 1 orange zested, then Juiced, remainder discarded
    • 1 lime, zested, then juiced, remainder discarded
    • 4 cloves fresh garlic, minced 
    • 1 tablespoon fresh tarragon leaves
    • 1/4 cup gluten-free soy sauce
    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 1 pound boneless, skinless gluten-free chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes (use free-range, organic chicken without fillers if possible).

    Gluten-Free Veggie Kabobs

    • Bell peppers
    • Onions
    • Cherry tomatoes
    • Mushrooms
    • Italian squash
    • Zuchinni
    • Sweet potato chunks
    • Tofu
    All of the above veggie kabob ideas are optional. Use foods that you like to grill. Make sure your veggies are chunked big enough to hold up well on kabob skewer.

    Gluten-Free Balsamic Vinaigrette (for veggie marinade)

    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
    • salt and pepper to taste
    To Make Kabobs:
    1. Thoroughly mix together all of the citrus-tarragon chicken ingredients (except the chicken) in a bowl. Toss the chicken in the mixture until evenly coated. Cover and marinate in refrigerator for 2 hours.
    2. Cut vegetables into bite-size pieces.
    3. Puree balsamic basting vinaigrette ingredients in a blender for 30 seconds.
    4. Grill kabobs directly over heat source for about 10 to 15 minutes, turning 1/4 rotation every 2 to 3 minutes, or until it's cooked throughout.
    Gluten-Free Fruit SaladGluten-Free Salads and Side Dishes:
    Salads are always a welcome gluten-free side dish, capable of complimenting any meal. To make your Memorial Day BBQ complete, here are some ideas for gluten-free side dishes. These side-dishes are gluten-free, easy and sure to be crowd pleasers-even for the gluten eating folks.
    Don't forget the gluten-free chips and snacks!
    Being gluten-free doesn't  mean you can't enjoy a cold beer on Memorial day like everyone else. There are many beer companies that now make gluten-free options. There are quite a few really amazing gluten-free beers on the market, so you shouldn't have to settle for a gluten-free beer you don't like, though you may have to sample many gluten-free beers before you find one that suits your tastes. However, finding a market that carries your favorite gluten-free beer is another issue all together. You may want to discuss options with your favorite grocery store. Many stores will offer to carry products for you if they know you will buy them regularly. The following list of beers are some of the top sellers and can be found at many specialty stores, grocery stores, and liquor stores.

    Gluten-Free Beers:

    • Greens Gluten-Free Beer
    • Redbridge Gluten-Free Beer
    • New Grist Gluten-Free Beer
    Gluten-Free desserts are certainly not sparse. Although, finding gluten-free, sugar-free, egg-free, dairy/casein-free, corn-free desserts are a bit trickier. Pecan pie is an all American favorite, and no Memorial Day should be without pecan pie. The following pecan pie recipe is raw, and requires no cooking, and contains almost none of the usual food allergens-unless of course you are allergic to pecans.

    Gluten-Free, Dairy/Casein-Free, Egg-Free, Corn-Free, Sugar-Free Pecan Pie

    Ingredients:
    • 2 cups raw almonds, soaked and drained
    • 35 pitted dates, soaked for 1 hour and drained
    • 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lime juice
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • 2 cups raw pecans, soaked and drained
    • pinch salt
    • Olive oil, to grease your pan
    To Make:
    Note: If you are not familiar with the process of soaking nuts, please review the following information before attempting this recipe.
    After soaking and drying the pecans complete the recipe as follows:
    1. Combine the almonds and 10 of the dates in a food processor, and process until they are coarsely ground and clumping together. Grease the bottom of a 9-inch square brownie pan or a pie plate with a little cold-pressed olive oil to keep the pie from sticking to the plate. Press the almond-and-date mixture evenly into the bottom of brownie pan and up the sides to form a crust. Set aside.
    2. Combine the remaining dates, the fresh lime juice, cinnamon, salt, and vanilla in a blender or small food processor, and process until the mixture has a smooth, uniform consistency. Spread the date filling evenly over the crust. Arrange the raw pecans on top of the date mixture and press lightly. Cut the pie into 2-inch squares and serve.
    Gluten-Free  Quick Check:
    • Use a clean BBQ grill or use aluminum foil
    • Use gluten-free condiments
    • Make sure your meat is gluten-free
    • Avoid cross contamination
    • Prepare enough gluten-free food to share
    Happy Memorial Day!

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  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/11/2010 - Halloween is upon us again, and for parents of children who must avoid gluten, a simple walk down the store candy aisle can present a daunting challenge: How to know with certainty which candies, especially seasonal candies, are safe for kids on a gluten-free diet?
    The good news this year is that awareness of gluten-sensitivity and gluten-free issues is on the rise, and more parents are demanding gluten-free candy choices. Also, more manufacturers are now identifying their candies as gluten-free, giving parents and trick-or-treaters a wider range of choices.
    It's easy to find gluten-free specialty candies from a reliable source. But, since more mainstream treats are common on Halloween night, it's helpful to know which ones are safe.
    Below you will find the latest gluten-friendly and gluten-free lists of candies which were current as of the date of this article. Below that you will also find a list of unsafe, NON-gluten-free candies, and a partial list of manufacturers with links to their websites. Remember, the list is meant to be used as a gauge, and is not meant to be authoritative or comprehensive. Adjust your vigilance according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.
    Gluten-friendly and Gluten-Free (Safe) Candy and Treats for Halloween

    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolateA
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead,
    B
    Baby Ruth
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks – “Gluten Free”
    Bit•O•Honey
    Butterfinger fun size
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop + gum
    C
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (lollipops made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew fun size
    Charms Blow Pops
    Charms Candy Carnival Package (Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum)
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks (Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye) – “Gluten Free”
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix (jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and candy characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story)
    Dove pieces (Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate)
    D
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots (candy corn flavored), Ghost Dots (assorted fruit flavored), and Bat Dots (blood orange flavored)
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix (includes Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops)
    Ferrara Pan Caramels
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix (includes Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots)
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks – “Gluten Free”
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar snack size
    Hershey’s Kisses - Milk Chocolate Only!!
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate snack size bars (1.55 ounce)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack size bars
    Hot Tamales – “Gluten Free”
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans are gluten-free and dairy-free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher lollipops and sticks
    Jr. Mints fun size
    Jujyfruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet-Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    LiveSavers Gummies
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's (all EXCEPT Pretzel M&M's)
    Mars Dove chocolate products (all)
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers & Snickers Dark bars
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) – “Gluten Free.”
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Milk Duds
    Mike and Ike – “Gluten Free”
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack-o-lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars
    Mr. Goodbar
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit-O-Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (but NOT the Butterfinger Crisp or the Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar-free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets and Sno-Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik-M-Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    O
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy -  maple and roasted peanuts
    Peeps Jack-o-lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats – “Gluten Free”
    Pez candy – “Gluten Free”
    Pop Rocks
    Pixie Stix
    R
    Rain•Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Crazy Cores fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Sour fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Smarties – the small pastel-colored candies sold in rolls, not Nestle’s chocolate version) – “Contains none of the following: gluten (from wheat, barley, oats and rye), milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy beans.”
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts – “Gluten Free”
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Swedish Fish treat size
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy – “This product is Gluten Free”
    T
    Tootsie Pops (original and miniatures)
    Tootsie Rolls midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Candy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix-Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix-Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys,
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix (SweetTart Chews were OK, but other packages in the bag were labeled with a cross-contamination warning. See list below.)
    X
    X-scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers – “Gluten Free”
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones (fruit flavored hard candy)


    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten-free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.
    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flourANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten-free
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers –  contains barley malt and wheat flour
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way –  contains barley malt
    Twix –  contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp –  contains wheat flour
    Crunch –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten-free.
    WONKA
    Sweetarts Gummy Bugs –  contains wheat/gluten
    Sweetarts Rope –  contains wheat/gluten
    Oompas
    Wonka Bar

    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:

    Contact Hershey's at 800-468-1714. Contact Jelly Belly at 800-522-3267. Contact Just Born at 888-645-3453 Contact Mars Chocolate at 800-627-7852. Contact Necco at 781-485-4800. Contact Nestle USA at 800-225-2270. Other resources:
    About.com Surefoodliving.com DivineCaroline.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/30/2011 - In a first of its kind study, a team of researchers is attempting a global estimate of the burden of celiac disease in childhood, and to to determine what role childhood celiac disease might play in global mortality due to diarrhea.
    The research team included Peter Byass, Kathleen Kahn, and Anneli Ivarsson. They are affiliated with the Umeå Centre for Global Health Research, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Umeå University in Umeå, Sweden, and with the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences at University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.
    In the last several decades, celiac disease has become an an increasingly recognized public health problem. More recently, celiac disease has emerged as a global earth issue, in spite scant globally representative epidemiological data.
    Because children with celiac disease often have chronic diarrhea and malnutrition, a proper diagnosis is often missed, especially in poorer settings, where water-borne infectious diarrheas are common, and many children fail to thrive.
    To make their assessment, the two used available data to build a basic model of childhood celiac disease, incorporating estimates of population prevalence, probability of non-diagnosis, and likelihood of mortality among undiagnosed children of all countries from 1970 to 2010.
    In their paper, the two state the assumptions underlying their model, and make the model available as a supplementary file.
    Based on their model, in 2010 there were around 2.2 million children under 5 years of age living with celiac disease, while each year, there would be about 42,000 deaths related to celiac disease in these children. That would mean that, in 2008, deaths related to celiac disease likely totaled about 4% of all childhood diarrhea deaths worldwide.
    Even if celiac disease accounts for only a small proportion of global diarrhea deaths, these deaths are preventable, but not by normal diarrhea treatment, which can often involve gluten-based food supplements.
    They also note that, as other causes of diarrhea mortality decline, celiac disease will become a proportionately greater problem unless clinicians begin to try gluten-free diets for children with chronic diarrhea and malnutrition.
    Source:

    PLoS One. 2011; 6(7): e22774. doi:  10.1371/journal.pone.0022774

    Frank Jackson
    Celiac.com 12/17/2013 - One of the biggest hurdles for those who have celiac disease is finding a way to get enough fiber in their diets. Removing wheat from the equation also eliminates a huge amount of roughage. Wheat provides the fiber in many breads, pastas, crackers and other staples of the American diet. Replacing that fiber is crucial, since the added bulk moves the food through your digestive system and keeps you regular.
    You should be aiming to consume between 25 and 35 grams of fiber per day. Here are a few ways to ensure you’re getting enough fiber in your diet, whether you’ve been living with celiac disease your entire life or just for a few weeks.
    Bulk Up Your Food
    There are plenty of fiber-rich foods that do not contain gluten. For example, fruits and vegetables are a great, all-natural source of fiber. You can add them to soups and sauces for a flavorful kick that will also provide a few extra grams of fiber. Skip the croutons on your salad — most contain gluten anyway — and sub in raisins for a sweet, filling treat.
    Flaxseed and chia seeds are two superfoods that are naturally gluten free and contain a hefty dose of fiber. Stir them into smoothies, sprinkle on your breakfast cereal, or shake them over yogurt to give it a bit of a crunch. With several grams of fiber per serving, nuts are also a great addition to just about any main or side dish. Kidney beans or chickpeas can be stirred into soups to increase the fiber count.
    Use Supplements
    Adding a supplement to your diet can be an excellent way to make up for the fiber you’re losing by not eating wheat. You’ll want to find natural supplements that mimic the way fiber found in food breaks down in your gut. One smart option is a prebiotic, such as Prebiotin — a plant fiber that also provides good bacteria to the colon, further aiding in digestion.
    Make Adjustments
    It’s possible to increase the fiber content in your diet by making simple substitutions. Perhaps you have always eaten white rice, which is easier on your sensitive stomach than brown. Well, now’s the time to give fiber-rich brown rice another try. Since your celiac diagnosis has probably cleared up most of your GI issues, you should be able to eat brown rice now without issue. Or try fiber-laden quinoa, a rice substitute that’s rich in both fiber and protein, as well as millet or amaranth as a white rice fill-in.
    Keep a Tally
    Before your celiac diagnosis, you may not have paid any attention to your daily fiber intake. But now it’s essential to track it for at least a few weeks to make sure you’re getting enough fiber. Aim for 20 grams at first, until you get the hang of searching out non-wheat fiber sources. Eventually, you’ll want to get to 25 or more grams per day, and you may find it’s not as hard as you expected.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2014 - As the number of students eating gluten-free continues to rise, colleges and universities are scrambling to keep up with an increasing demand for gluten-free options.
    The latest news comes from the University of Wisconsin, where the Net Nutrition program enables students with food allergies to more easily navigate the cafeteria.
    The program allows people to screen for allergens and food intolerance, and offers an easy way to subtract menu items a person cannot have, she said. UW’s dining halls have incorporated gluten-free items such as pizza, pasta, deserts and various baked goods, while Union South has also incorporated gluten-free options at its restaurants.
    The result has been a dramatic increase in the number of gluten-free UW student food options.
    Still, for best results, students need to get involved, says Barbara Kautz, faculty adviser for the Gluten-Free Badgers student organization. Katz calls student self-advocacy the most important factor in making gluten-free options available on campus.
    That means that interested UW students should call ahead if they plan to attend UW-hosted events that serve food. Once alerted, food services will be sure to provide a gluten-free option, Katz says.
    Kautz says she is pushing to have gluten-tolerance status included in the admission paperwork UW collects for each student.

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    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.