• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,913
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Richardmc
    Newest Member
    Richardmc
    Joined
  • 0

    Gluten-Free Menus in School: A Worthwhile Food Fight


    Amy Leger

    Celiac.com 10/29/2008 - Equality.  That’s all any parent wants for his or her child.  In this case I’m talking about food at school.  Are you completely frustrated that you can’t get a gluten-free lunch for your child at school?   According to a recent survey by the American Celiac Disease Alliance, many parents of celiac children may feel the same way.  The survey conducted during the summer of 2008, found of 2,200 respondents, 90% had to regularly pack gluten-free lunches for their celiac child. I used to be one of them and was stuck feeling like I was banging my head against a wall trying to get a few hot lunches for my child.  That goal of equality saw me through a journey — years in the making — that would eventually pay off.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Just before my celiac daughter’s kindergarten year began, I thought I covered all my bases.  I talked to the school nurse, Emma’s teacher, and the head of the cafeteria about her condition and her diet.  I found there was very little she could have at school except beef tacos, which she loved.  Eventually that one menu item, which made my daughter feel just like the rest of the kids, vanished; a near tragedy for her, sheer frustration for me.  I would ask myself “Why do the schools have to serve up so much food with gluten?” I also didn’t feel like I was taken seriously by the cafeteria employees.  I housed some small gluten-free food items in the freezer at school in case of emergency.  That expensive food was thrown away, with no one even realizing they did it.  That told me, they weren’t paying attention.  And I was done.  It seemed as though Emma was destined for cold lunches until she graduated from high school.  

    Honestly, school lunches may not be the perfect meals for our children, but suddenly many parents feel an urgency to feed them school food when their celiac child starts to feel left out.

    The good news is: times may be changing.  Sherri Knutson, Student Nutrition Services Coordinator for the Rochester, Minnesota School District, and her staff have developed a monthly gluten-free, menu for students.   “We’re making it come together…to meet the needs of the student,” Knutson said.  It is more like students!  As many as 20 children every day order from this menu which actually mirrors the “regular” monthly menu, including gluten-free chicken nuggets, spaghetti and hamburgers WITH a bun.  Knutson says they started slow in 2004, offering only a few gluten-free options each week and then expanded from there.

    Offering the menu comes at a cost – to the district.  Officials with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), which oversees the school lunch program, say schools cannot charge parents more for specialized, expensive diets.  A regular school lunch in that district costs $2.05, but the gluten-free lunch costs about double.  Knutson’s district essentially “eats” the cost.  “Cost is not one of the factors that should impact [implementing this diet in schools].”  But she admits they look into finding ways to cut costs, like baking their own gluten-free goodies.

    Now word is spreading about this groundbreaking menu.  Knutson says she is getting calls from school districts across the country asking her how she does it.  Her answer is simple, start small and do what you can.  She also asks parents to be understanding and patient; accommodating the gluten-free diet is very new for most school districts. 

    My conversation with Knutson was enlightening and empowering, but back at home I was struggling with my own district.  There were times in the last four years, where I wondered if the district even cared about my daughter’s health and nutrition needs.  After months of many unanswered emails and phone calls with my district nutrition department in late 2007 and early 2008, I finally called my school board member to get some attention.  That one phone call got the ball rolling.  In the six months since, I have had several meetings with key employees in the district and school.  My district also appointed a coordinator for specialized diets who works directly with schools that have special food requirements for certain students.  In October of 2008, I saw a first draft if it’s two-week, gluten-free menu.  The nutritionist I work with tells me it is just the beginning.  I am so pleased and proud of them for finally taking some much-needed action.

    It is amazing how far you can come with a lot of work, tenacity and passion for equality.  If you are in the same situation that I was, I urge you to take action.  If your school cook won’t help you, go to the district nutrition director, if they won’t help you go to the superintendent, if they won’t help you go to the school board, and if they won’t help you, contact the education department in your state.  That group may oversee statewide compliance of USDA rules.  I was able to get this done without a 504 plan for my child.  Simply put, a 504 plan is detailed paperwork which gets you the needed accommodations for your child and their diet.  You may need to create a 504 plan to push along the lunch changes for your child.  Watch for much more on this important issue in upcoming posts.

    I cannot guarantee you will get drastic changes in lunch offerings from your district, so if you are still in a slump, check out the American Celiac Disease Alliance.  Serving specialized diets in school is a hot topic right now and the ACDA is trying to advocate for all of us.  Your child has a right to eat school food.  And this is one food fight – worth getting in on!

    *For much more information on the Rochester, MN School District’s Gluten Free menu, see this article I wrote for FoodService Director Magazine in September 2008.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Excellent article. I assume that any other food allergy would be handled the same as a gluten intolerance.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Pam Shepard

    Posted

    The 504 plan makes life much easier. Mary has been very lucky. She has had gluten free lunches since she started in Head Start at age 3 and was diagnosed with celiac disease at the age of 3 1/2. For any child in the public school system a 504 plan is the way to go. She is in the 8th grade now and the family living course has been a challenge as it involves cooking. Unfortunately for her she is the one breaking the way in her school district. Now if I could just convince the school district to change the form they use for the 504 plans. Theirs is all on disruptive behaviors not a thing on it about food allergies or malabsorption problems. They were not happy when I insisted on certain things being placed on her plan and adding an extra page to it that I had done on our home computer. This is also an issue that needs to be addressed from the federal level to the state level and then to the local level. Thank you for letting me vent about 504 plans in the state of Pennsylvania.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    This article expands upon a serious problem. In our school district we couldn't even get an answer about ingredients in the tater tots! I am looking for support and ways to tackle this same issue!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I found this article to be very interesting, but honestly, with the concerns of cross-contamination, I wouldn't trust the school cafeteria to be as careful as they need to be. I work in a school system and am familiar with the cafeteria process - their main concern is herding a large number of kids through every day. I can't see them being able to keep everything separate that needs to be, using separate grills, utensils, etc. Besides that, the quality of food offered in the school system is questionable to begin with. My daughter has packed her lunch to school every day since she was diagnosed, and often she tells me that the kids would rather have what she's having! Yes it can be a pain, but I don't think I'd take the risk of her getting gluten in her food just for the sake of convenience.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Nice idea, however, school lunches are not usually very nutritious. Chicken nuggets? Pasta? Hamburger buns? It seems it would benefit all children's health more if the emphasis were placed on improved nutrition of food, which naturally leads to less gluten. That, however, if where the cost really goes up! Fresh food is expensive, especially when so much of it would be thrown away by wasteful picky kids! The bag lunch option looks pretty good to me! How can we use our energy instead to get mandatory testing of kids here in the USA, like they do in Italy, so more kids are properly diagnosed, leaving our gluten intolerant kids not feeling so 'left out' with a bag lunch? LOTS of the kids in the lunchroom can't eat it - despite their ignorance. This frustrates me more than being excluded from the poor quality lunch offerings.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I've always packed my sons lunch, but interesting to think of fighting for him to have access to food at school. Thanks!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Alexandra Isom

    Posted

    Wow!! this is really ironic as I just tried an idea out on my school about a gluten free lunch once a month just to see how it goes. I was diagnosed in march 2009 and I will be 16 on september 30th, and you know the craziness of being a girl plus worrying about this disease is hectic. The only people I know personally so far with celiac is a sub teacher in our school and a psychologist at my school. An adult told me about her and I talked to her she gave me great tips! Anyway I wrote a proposal and talked to my principal and then he took me to the head of our school lunches. His son actually had celiac wen he was real little but grew and changed and got out of it! She said the problem with this is she has to order food at month supply at a time which made me sort of sad.. just because of that may be the reason it may or wont happen.. but she told me I could store stuff in the fridge with a date and name on it but like what happened to you I'm scared they won't care or will forget and just throw it away. Even if I'm in 10th grade I still feel left out sometimes with this whole shabang! but I hope they get the word out about school lunches and a gluten free menu. I'm definitely showing this article to some of the staff at my school!! Thank you for posting this.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Wow!! this is really ironic as I just tried an idea out on my school about a gluten free lunch once a month just to see how it goes. I was diagnosed in march 2009 and I will be 16 on september 30th, and you know the craziness of being a girl plus worrying about this disease is hectic. The only people I know personally so far with celiac is a sub teacher in our school and a psychologist at my school. An adult told me about her and I talked to her she gave me great tips! Anyway I wrote a proposal and talked to my principal and then he took me to the head of our school lunches. His son actually had celiac wen he was real little but grew and changed and got out of it! She said the problem with this is she has to order food at month supply at a time which made me sort of sad.. just because of that may be the reason it may or wont happen.. but she told me I could store stuff in the fridge with a date and name on it but like what happened to you I'm scared they won't care or will forget and just throw it away. Even if I'm in 10th grade I still feel left out sometimes with this whole shabang! but I hope they get the word out about school lunches and a gluten free menu. I'm definitely showing this article to some of the staff at my school!! Thank you for posting this.

    FYI: You can't grow out of celiac disease, so you may want to let your principal know that his son likely still has it, even if he doesn't have symptoms (unless the original diagnosis was wrong).

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Alexandra

    Posted

    I thought my school was accommodating my son's needs until I found out this morning that he was served Lucky Charms for breakfast. Lucky Charms are made with oats, which are highly cross-contaminated with gluten. I called them about it, and they still seem to think Lucky Charms are gluten-free, so back to making lunches and breakfasts.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    My daughter was diagnosed at 15 months old back in 2000. I have been passionate about celiac disease and the gluten free diet ever since. Now my brother was just diagnosed and during the 2008-2009 school year my husband and I took in a Norwegian exchange student with celiac disease. I have just started a blog called www.thesavvyceliac.com and enjoy sharing my views and experiences with others through my blog.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   2 Members, 0 Anonymous, 260 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 03/12/2010 - According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease. Characterized by small intestinal inflammation, intestinal injury and intolerance to gluten, celiac is  a genetic T-cell mediated auto-immune disease. Those diagnosed with celiac disease know that the only cure is an entirely gluten-free diet for life.  When left untreated, celiac can manifest into life-threatening illnesses such as, heart disease, osteoporosis, and cancer. However, modern science is now presenting us with an alternative to suffering needlessly, and it comes in the shape of a little non-assuming pill called Larazotide Acetate.
    While celiac disease affects 1 in 133 people, those numbers do not take into account the thousands of other people who are impacted from gluten intolerance and gluten related allergies. Gluten comes in many disguises but can be found primarily in wheat, rye, and barley. Since the Food and Drug Administration has not yet mandated gluten disclosures on labels, many foods are contaminated with hidden gluten. People that suffer from the inability to digest gluten are extremely limited when it comes to dining, and often find themselves eating alone or bringing their own gluten-free food to social events.
    Eating a microscopic amount of gluten, for many gluten sensitive sufferers,  frequently leads to varying degrees of sicknesses including, diarrhea, vomiting, rashes, and insomnia. Some people are more sensitive than others, and those most sensitive to gluten cannot eat at many restaurants due to the chance of cross contamination. Much like a peanut allergy, those gluten sensitive can  get sick from eating gluten-free food that was cooked in the same kitchen as gluten food by means of contamination, or simply from receiving a kiss from a loved one that has traces of gluten on their mouth.
    With so many unsavory reactions to food, the medical community has been attempting to devise a drug for celiacs that allows them to safely digest gluten. A new drug called Larazotide Acetate, has been called 'revolutionary' to the celiac and gluten sensitive community, and may be what celiacs need to live a more normal life. While it is not a cure, Larazotide Acetate has been proven in clinical trials to greatly reduce the negative reactions celiacs have with gluten. Clinical test patients displayed a decrease  in  intestinal damage, from 50% to 15%, when ingesting gluten after taking Larazotide Acetate.
    Larazotide Acetate may very well be the new breakthrough drug of the decade. It offers celiacs and others with gluten sensitivities, the freedom to eat out at restaurants, or go to a friends house for dinner without the physiological and emotional stress that can accrue from worrying about, and getting sick from gluten contaminated food.
    Source:

    http://calgary.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100305/edm_gluten_100305/20100305/?hub=CalgaryHome

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/15/2011 - This year, Easter Sunday falls on April 24, 2011. With Easter peeking around the corner, it's time for some gluten-free Easter celebration tips.
    For many folks, in addition to its religious aspects, Easter means colored eggs, hot cross buns, candy, gift baskets and pancake breakfasts, among other celebrations.
    The good news is that many basic Easter foods, snacks, and ingredients are already gluten-free, so with minimal information and adjustment, you'll be able to create a great gluten-free celebration this Easter.
    Easter means eggs: coloring eggs and egg hunts and egg rolls, and making egg salad or potato salad, or macaroni salad, or deviled eggs from all those Easter Eggs that don't get eaten right away.
    I like to eat egg salad as a topping on my favorite gluten-free crackers, or served open-face on a piece of freshly toasted gluten-free bread. Egg salad is also great on crisp, fresh lettuce.


    Great Easter Egg Salad Recipe
    Ingredients:
    8 hard boiled eggs
    1 tablespoon mayonnaise
    2 tablespoons prepared Dijon-style mustard
    1/2 teaspoon dried dill weed
    1 teaspoon paprika
    salt and pepper to tastePreparation:
    If you don't already have plenty of hard boiled eggs from Easter, then place eight eggs in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil; cover, remove from heat, and let eggs stand in hot water for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from hot water, cool, peel and chop.
    In a large bowl, combine the egg, mayonnaise, mustard, dill, paprika, and salt and pepper. Mash well with a fork or wooden spoon.
    Serve on gluten-free bread as a sandwich or over crisp, fresh lettuce as a salad.


    Deviled Eggs
    Deviled-eggs are great because they're not only gluten-free, they are easy to make, and stand alone as great hors devours, or picnic snacks.Ingredients:
    8 large eggs
    3 tablespoons mayonnaise
    1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    1/8 teaspoon paprika
    Directions:
    Once again, if you don't already have plenty of hard boiled eggs from Easter, then place eight eggs in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil; cover, remove from heat, and let eggs stand in hot water for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from hot water, cool, peel and chop.
    Peel eggs and split in half lengthwise. Gently remove yolks and mash in a bowl with a fork. Add mayonnaise, mustard, and paprika. Stir with fork until smooth, then season with salt and pepper.
    Fill pastry bag or plastic bag with yolk mixture and squeeze into egg whites. Garnish with chopped fresh chives


    Gluten-free Macaroni Salad
    Easter brings back fond memories of eating macaroni salad off paper in the grass. I like Schar pasta a lot, so I substitute Schar Penne for macaroni in this recipe. For purists, Barkat makes a good gluten-free macaroni.Ingredients:
    4 cups uncooked gluten-free penne or elbow macaroni
    1 cup mayonnaise
    1/4 cup distilled white vinegar
    2/3 cup white sugar
    2 1/2 tablespoons prepared yellow mustard
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1 large onion, chopped
    2 stalks celery, chopped
    1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped
    Directions:
    In a large bowl, mix together the mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, mustard, salt and pepper. Stir in the onion, celery, and green pepper. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours before serving, but preferably overnight.
    Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the macaroni, and cook until tender, about 8 minutes. Rinse under cold water and drain. When macaroni or penne is cool and well-drained, place into a large bowl and fold in the mayonnaise mixture. Serve cold.


    Baked Easter Ham
    Many people celebrate Easter with a traditional sit-down dinner of baked ham with all the trimmings.Ingredients:
    15 lbs lean whole bone-in ham
    1 lb brown sugar
    1/2 cup gluten-free yellow or brown mustard
    aluminum foil
    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 350°
    In a medium size mixing bowl, combine yellow mustard and brown sugar into a thick paste. Trim away excess fat from ham.
    Grease a baking pan with cooking oil, and line with Aluminum foil. Place ham on foil and coat ham with brown sugar/mustard paste. Fold and seal foil.
    Place in oven and bake at 350° for 4 hours. Do not open foil until ham is done. Remove from oven, open foil, and allow ham to cool for one hour before carving.
    Great gluten-free bread options include:

    Gluten-free Sandwich Breads Gluten-free Baguettes and Specialty Breads Gluten-free buns and rolls For those who prefer to bake their own gluten-free bread, try a gluten-free bread mix: Easter also means sweets and treats, from marshmallow rabbits to Cadbury Eggs, to Peeps. As always, check labels carefully. Contact manufacturers as needed. You can find a pretty good list of gluten-free Easter candy at gfreefoodie.com.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/29/2013 - Parents of children with food allergies can take heart in recent developments at the federal level that are mandating changes in the ways colleges and universities address food-allergy issues in their students.
    A recent federal civil rights settlement between the Department of Justice and Lesley University that arose from Lesley's failure to provide gluten-free food shows that traditional one-style-fits-all dining options are no longer an ­option for our institutions of higher learning.
    The settlement requires Lesley to “continually provide” students with gluten-free dining options and pay $50,000 in damages to ensure the university is in compliance with a federal law that protects people with disabilities.
    As a result, more and more universities are scrambling to make safe food alternatives available to students with severe food allergies, including those with celiac disease, as required by the under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
    This adjustment includes gluten-free food offerings, and colleges and universities in Massachusetts are among the first to attempt the adjustment. Their approaches differ slightly, but the goal is to provide a safe, reliable dining experience to students with food allergies.
    The University of Massachusetts Boston and Boston University have created gluten-free zones in cafeterias and food courts, while others are taking a more individual approach. Tufts and Harvard University, for example, are having nutritionists and dining hall staff work with students to figure out what prepared foods can and cannot be eaten and ordering specialty items as necessary.
    Tufts' plan also includes establishing a dedicated freezer-refrigerator unit in its two dining halls that is stocked with gluten-free foods. The units are kept locked, and only students with special dietary needs are given keys
    UMass Amherst publishes dining hall menus online, and identifies gluten-free offerings with a special icon. The school also has an extensive handout on what foods to avoid and whom to contact if students need gluten-free food.
    About a year ago, UMass Boston created a gluten-free zone in its food court, with a dedicated refrigerator, microwave, and toaster to minimize the risk of contamination.
    Look for the trend to continue as more and more colleges deal with the new legal realities of feeding students who have food allergies.
    Sources:
    http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/01/16/college-dining-halls-latest-challenge-gluten-free/ZGWMFABp0ruPI87L8BV8wM/story.html http://www.dailynebraskan.com/news/article_32cd62de-6908-11e2-951f-0019bb30f31a.html

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/20/2015 - Most all gins and whiskeys, and many vodkas, are distilled from grain. While many people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance can drink them with no adverse effects, many others cannot.
    These brands of gin, whiskey and vodka are made with gluten-free ingredients, and safe for people with celiac disease and wheat sensitivity.
    So anyone with celiac disease who has been missing their gin or whiskey can now happily indulge. Cheers!
    GLUTEN-FREE GIN
    Cold River Gin is distilled from potatoes. The company’s website says that, like their world-famous vodkas, their gluten-free gin is made with whole Maine potatoes and the pure water of Maine's Cold River. Cold River uses a recipe that “dates back to the early days of British gin,” and contains their own “secret blend of seven traditional botanicals that are steeped for the perfect amount of time to infuse the essential flavors.” GLUTEN-FREE WHISKEY
    Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghumThe idea of a whiskey made from gluten-free grains is sure to excite anyone with celiac disease who longs for a wee dram. The company’s web page says that Queen Jennie is made with 100% Wisconsin Sorghum, and is “Less sour than a bourbon and less harsh than a rye.” GLUTEN-FREE VODKA
    Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito’s, UV Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson’s, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac Monopolowa is one of my favorites, and is usually available at Trader Joe’s. Cold River gluten-free vodka is triple-distilled in a copper pot still, from Maine potatoes and water from Maine's Cold River. Tito’s award winning vodka is six times distilled from corn in an old-fashioned pot still, just like fine single malt scotches and high-end French cognacs. Tito’s is certified Gluten-free.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au