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  • Destiny Stone
    Destiny Stone

    Gluten-Free Mother's Day

    Caption: Mother's Day Gluten-Free Gift Basket

    Celiac.com 04/15/2010 - Mother's day is right around the corner, and what better way to tell your mom you love her, than to make her  a lovely gluten-free brunch. Even if your mom is a gluten eater, it is still a  perfect opportunity to try out some new gluten-free recipes. Many people with gluten sensitivities are also sensitive to foods other than gluten. That is why for this special day, I am including some gluten-free recipes that are also free of most common allergens.

    Making brunch for your mom on Mother's Day doesn't have to be expensive, and a gluten-free brunch isn't hard at all. If you have a recipe that you love, but you don't know how to make it gluten-free, do an Internet search for your favorite dish and add "gluten-free” to the beginning of your search. You will be amazed at how many recipes have already been converted to gluten-free, and are on the Internet to be shared by all.

    Vegan Gluten Free Lemon Coconut Cream SconesThe following recipes are gluten-free, dairy/casein-free, egg-free, nut-free, corn free, and shell-fish free-actually free of all animal products. Even if you don't need to avoid other allergens, you might find that you like  these gluten free recipes better than you expect.  Although, the following recipes can also be modified to fit your taste buds. So if a recipe calls for non-dairy margarine for example, use butter, or coconut oil if you prefer. Don't hesitate to dig in and get creative!

    The following link is for a recipe that I can't wait to try. This basic recipe can be elaborated on, and you can top with the fruit of your choice. This is an excellent idea for brunch, or wrap them up and present them as a gift.

     The wonderful thing about the following Tofu Benedict  recipe,  is that it can be modified to suit your taste buds. If you eat meat, you can add gluten-free meat to your Benedict, or anything that you think your mom would enjoy on her special day. It's also a very easy recipe and doesn't take long to prepare.

    Gluten-Free Tofu Benedict RecipeGluten-Free Tofu Benedict Recipe

    Ingredients:
    • 1 lb. extra firm tofu
    • 1/4 cup distilled apple cider vinegar
    • 1/4 tsp. Himalyan salt (or table salt)
    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 4 Tbsp. gluten-free nondairy butter substitute
    • 8 oz. nondairy gluten-free sour cream
    • 1 tsp. gluten-free paprika
    • 1/2 tsp. gluten-free nutmeg
    • Pinch of gluten-free cayenne
    • 1 Tbsp. fresh squeezed lemon juice
    • 4 gluten-free  English muffins, toasted (or 8 slices of toast) Gluten-Free English Muffins  
    • 8 slices  tomato
    Preheat the oven to 450ºF. Drain the tofu, cut it into 8 slices, and arrange it in a single layer in an oiled 9”x13” baking dish.
    In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, salt, and olive oil and pour the mixture over the tofu. Bake the tofu for 20 minutes, basting it occasionally and turning it over after 10 minutes. Pour off any excess liquid and bake the tofu for a few more minutes—until it is brown and crispy.
    To make the hollandaise sauce, melt the butter substitute  in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the nondairy sour cream, paprika, nutmeg, cayenne, and lemon juice. Make sure that the mixture is heated through but don’t allow it to boil.
    Top each English muffin half with a slice of tofu, tomato slice, and a generous spoonful of hollandaise sauce to taste.
    Serve immediately & Enjoy!

    Gluten-Free Gift Baskets

    Giving your mom a thoughtful Mother's Day gift doesn't have to be expensive. Gift baskets come in all shapes and sizes, so you don't have to spend a fortune to show your mom how much you love her.

    *Tip: To save money, make your own gluten-free gift basket. Purchase an inexpensive basket at your local craft store, fill it up with gluten-free goodies, wrap it with cellophane and a pretty bow and in no time, you have a customized gluten-free gift basket made especially for your mom.

    Fill your gluten-free gift basket up with gluten-free goodies; below are some ideas.

    If your mom likes to cook, what better way to pamper her, than to give her the gift that keeps on giving. Below is a link of gluten-free cookbooks. Cookbooks also make a wonderful addition to your gift basket.
    Don't forget the chocolate! No gift basket is complete without chocolate and most moms enjoy a little chocolate on occasion. The following is a list of gluten-free chocolate treats. You will find everything from chocolate cakes and cookies, to chocolate mousse and chocolate chips. So even if you don't have time to bake her a cake, you can still give your mom some yummy gluten-free chocolate treats to enjoy on  Mother's Day.
    Keep your mom in style this Spring. Our celiac awareness shirts are a welcome addition to any gift basket or even by themselves.
    What do you get for the gluten-free mom that has everything? Try a giftvoucher for the Gluten Free Mall. Vouchers can accommodate any budgetand they also make an excellent last minute gift. So this year, thereis no excuse for not giving your mom something nice for  Mother's Day.
    Mother's Day Ideas:
    • Make gluten-free brunch
    • Convert your favorite recipes to “gluten-free”
    • Make your mom a gluten-free gift basket
    Happy Mother's Day!



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  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

  • Related Articles

    Lionel Mugema
    Celiac.com 06/17/2009 - He stands aloof and watches absent-mindedly as the other children queue up for the food. He remembers his mother’s stern warning and the hunger pangs worsen. He knows the even a morsel of the delicious mouth-watering cake will surely make him ill. Meet Mike, he was born with celiac disease.
    Mike’s parents are well-off and highly educated. According to his mother, Mrs. Kintu, shortly after his birth Mike started showing signs and his parents immediately took him to a European hospital for a check-up.  The doctors did an endoscopic exam and Mike was diagnosed with celiac disease. Mike had to stick to a gluten free diet for the rest of his life. Mike’s life was spared.
    Had Mike been born in a poor family, Mike would have eventually lost his life to celiac disease, just like the increasingly shocking numbers of African infants between the very minor age of 6 months and 4 years that die every year—particularly in the East-African region. The acute lack of awareness and subtle ignorance about the disease leads the devastated parents to think that sorcery or envious neighbors robbed them of their little ones.
    Mike is alive today and maintains a particularly sparse diet and survives on such food as vegetables, rice, beans, potatoes, small quantities of red meat, and fresh fruits. Granted, this may seem like a rather healthy and outright fulfilling diet for an adult, however, as fate would have it, Mike is also lactose-intolerant. Essentially, this means that, in lay-man’s language, Mike is allergic to milk in its natural form and all its by-products.
    Celiac disease is a permanent inflammatory disease of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing cereals in genetically predisposed individuals. It is a lifelong autoimmune intestinal disorder. Damage to the mucosal surface of the small intestine is caused by an immunologically toxic reaction to the ingestion of gluten and interferes with the absorption of nutrients. Celiac disease is unique in that a specific food component, gluten, has been identified as the trigger. Gluten is the common name for the offending proteins in specific cereal grains that are harmful to persons with celiac disease. These proteins are found in all forms of wheat (including durum, semolina, spelt, kamut, einkorn, and faro), and related grains such as rye and barley must also be eliminated.
    Celiac disease was first described in the second century AD by Aretaeus of Cappadocia, a contemporary of the Roman physician Galen, who used the Greek word “koeliakos”, which means “suffering of the bowels”. However, only in 1888 AD did Samuel Gee of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital give the classical clinical description of celiac disease.
    The cause of celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, or gluten sensitive enteropathy (GSE), is unknown. Celiac disease occurs in 5-15% of the offspring and siblings of a person with celiac disease. In 70% of identical twin pairs, both twins have the disease. It is strongly suggested that family members be tested, even if asymptomatic. Family members who have an autoimmune disease are at a 25% increased risk of having celiac disease.
    Celiac disease displays itself with the following symptoms:

    Recurring bloating, gas, or abdominal pain Chronic diarrhea or constipation or both Bone or joint pain Behavior changes/depression/irritability Vitamin K Deficiency Fatigue, weakness or lack of energy Delayed growth or onset of puberty Failure to thrive (in infants) Missed menstrual periods Infertility in male & female Spontaneous miscarriages Canker sores inside the mouth Tooth discoloration or loss of enamel
    And many others (to see a complete list go to the Celiac Disease Symptoms page).In any case, there is little or no research on this disease in East Africa. The principal ideals behind this article are the commencement of an awareness program, with particular emphasis on celiac disease and any other diseases that are not generally known about in the region. It is important that these are brought to the light and addressed duly by the concerned parties. There is also an urgent need to formally address the problem especially to those that can not possibly afford treatment and are generally ignorant. I am in the process of establishing an awareness campaign concurrently with a patients’ association for celiac disease in East Africa. The association is still in its infant stages and I am appealing for support and any form of assistance.  The name of my association is: Creating Celiac Disease Awareness in Africa.
    Author's Note: The names of the characters in this article have been changed for privacy reasons.



    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N
    Celiac.com 05/16/2011 - Nearly 75% of the 24 million Americans suffering from autoimmune disease are women, according to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA).  Women appear to mount larger inflammatory responses than men when their immune systems are triggered, thereby increasing their risk of autoimmunity.  The fact that sex hormones are involved is indicated by the fact that many autoimmune diseases fluctuate with hormonal changes such as those that occur during pregnancy, during the menstrual cycle, or when using oral contraceptives. A history of pregnancy also appears to increase the risk for autoimmune disease.
    The sex hormone that is commonly low in such women is Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). This is a natural steroid and is produced by the adrenal glands, the reproductive organs and the brain.  DHEA is used by the body to make the male and female hormones, testosterone and estrogen respectively, and is known to have anti-inflammatory effects. It has been proposed that a DHEA deficiency is a contributing factor in autoimmune diseases.  Last year a study was done to look at precisely that effect.  The study’s conclusions have been supported by other, similar research and I think you’ll find it quite interesting.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Vol. 94, No. 6 2044-2051(2009) published an article entitled “Low Serum Levels of Sex Steroids Are Associated with Disease Characteristics in Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome; Supplementation with Dehydroepiandrosterone Restores the Concentrations”. The authors investigated whether there was a relationship between steroid levels and the disease characteristics of Sjogren’s.
    They based their study on the known data that DHEA not only declines with aging but is reduced in Sjogren’s, an autoimmune disease. The study was populated by 23 post-menopausal women with primary Sjogren’s syndrome and subnormal levels of DHEA. The investigation was a controlled, double blind crossover study, conducted over a 9 month period, where DHEA was assessed by sophisticated laboratory measurements and typical symptoms of Sjogren’s such as dry mouth and eyes and salivary flow rates were similarly assessed.
    Results revealed a strong correlation between low DHEA and Sjogren’s symptoms.  DHEA and its sex hormone metabolites (testosterone and estrogen) were found to increase with DHEA supplementation but not with the placebo. Symptoms such as dry eyes were seen to improve as estrogen levels
    The researchers concluded that the disease manifestations of primary Sjogren’s syndrome were associated with low sex hormone levels and the supplementation of DHEA allowed the body to transform into androgens, testosterone and estrogen, with testosterone production predominating.
    Please allow me to add some personal interpretation. For the most part I agree with the premise and applaud the results. The facts that autoimmune disease occurs more often in women, that women frequently have low DHEA, and that androgens have anti-inflammatory effects that can benefit autoimmune disease are all true.
    But should we simply give such women DHEA and call it a day? I don’t think so.  I propose that we do three things: First, evaluate hormonal levels in women regularly; Second, address WHY their hormonal levels are imbalanced;  And third, when supplementing with hormones such as DHEA, ensure that the delivery system is one that mimics what the body does naturally.
    Remember that autoimmune disease can begin many years before the first symptoms become manifest. Therefore evaluating hormonal levels in our younger women is a good idea.  When I find DHEA levels that are low, my first order of business is to assess why.  Frequently it is due to a phenomenon known as “pregnenelone steal” that occurs when the adrenal glands are under stress.  It is a common occurrence and one of the fantastic abilities of the human body to shift from one pathway to another when under stress.  The “steal” pathway diverts the body away from making sex hormones and instead it makes more “stress” hormones.  So while adding some DHEA into the mix might very well help, does it make sense to find out WHY it’s being diverted away from making sex hormones?  I hope so because it’s the very foundation of the medicine that we practice—functional medicine.
    Once you understand the root cause of the deficiency you can take steps to truly remedy it rather than simply covering it up by taking DHEA.  Not to keep hitting you over the head with this concept, but supplementing with DHEA as your sole treatment misses the underlying cause since the body is designed to make adequate quantities of DHEA.
    A common reason for the diversion or “steal” pathway to become activated is adrenal stress from poor absorption of nutrients, unstable blood sugar and the presence of infections—all problems we see with the gluten intolerant patient! While I’m not implying that every autoimmune patient has a gluten intolerance, it certainly warrants screening all of them because of its high prevalence.
    As we travel down the road to optimal health through avoiding any food the body isn’t tolerating well, improving the integrity of the small intestine and normalizing adrenal function, there are certainly times when hormonal supplementation is beneficial. I don’t recommend the oral route because the first place the hormone travels is to the liver and this can be burdensome to that organ.  When the body makes hormones naturally it delivers them straight to the bloodstream.  In an effort to mimic that delivery system we use a buccal route (placed between cheek and gum in the mouth) that does a good job in bringing the hormone directly to the bloodstream and bypassing the liver and digestive tract.
    Autoimmune diseases comprise the third leading cause of death in our country and research strongly suggests that its rapid increase is due to environmental factors, especially those that weaken the small intestine. I am committed to earlier diagnosis while the disease is still remediable, as well as overall reduction of incidence through addressing digestive health.
    I hope you find this informative.  Please share this information with those who have autoimmune disease themselves as well as in their family.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/05/2011 - The rise in celiac disease awareness and the explosion of foods for people who must eat gluten-free is generally a good thing. However, when companies rush products into the gluten-free market without a well-practiced and comprehensive plan, they can easily make mistakes.
    Consider the case of California Pizza Kitchen. In June, the company proudly announced the debut of a gluten-free pizza crust. Then, in August, the restaurant chain quietly pulled the crust from its menu, in what appears to be a re-evaluation of its gluten-free preparation process.
    This is a good thing, since numerous customers complained of symptoms of gluten-contamination, and the company itself acknowledged that their preparation process allowed possible cross-contamination from their standard pizza crusts.
    Many in the celiac community have pointed out that even though the crust is gluten-free, it is being prepared in the same areas as the gluten-containing crusts. So the pizza could be cross-contaminated with wheat, which has adverse health effects for people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity.
    On the California Pizza Kitchen Twitter feed, the company said that it is reviewing its preparation procedures, while leaving open the possibility that it might once again offer gluten-free pizza.
    Efforts by companies like Walt Disney, and more recently by Subway, show that it is possible to consistently deliver a safe and satisfying gluten-free dining experience to large numbers of people. However, it takes awareness of needs of the gluten-free community, and a comprehensive preparation and delivery plan to do it consistently well.
    Ideally, California Pizza Kitchen will learn and grow from this experience, and return from the drawing board with a plan to deliver safe, gluten-free versions of their unique and much-loved pizzas.
    Until then, stay tuned...


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/25/2015 - General Mills has announced that original Cheerios, Honey Nut Cheerios and three other Cheerios varieties will undergo formula changes, including a switch to gluten-free oats, and will be released as a gluten-free cereal.
    The move by the food and cereal giant mirrors a similar recipe change that successfully boosted sales for its Chex brand, which has been gluten-free since 2010.
    The company will likely begin selling gluten-free versions in July, says Jim Murphy, president of Big G Cereals, General Mills' ready-to-eat cereal division.
    Apparently, General Mills felt that that could no longer ignore the skyrocketing sales of gluten-free foods, and the slow decline of foods that contain gluten, including breakfast cereals.
    "People are actually walking away from cereal because they are avoiding gluten," says Murphy, a development that, at a time when cereal sales, including Cheerios, are already weak, the company can ill afford.
    Meanwhile, unit sales growth of food with a gluten-free claim on its packaging grew 10.6% in 2014 compared to the previous year, and gluten-free sales, especially among breakfast cereals are expected to continue double-digit growth through at least 2018.

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