Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Gluten-free Wasteland Girl Scout Crushes Cookie Sales

    Caption: Brutal honesty helps Girl Scout crush cookie sales record. Photo: CC--JayJayOh

    Celiac.com 03/28/2017 - A savvy Girl Scout from New Jersey is close to selling more cookies than anyone in history thanks to her brutal reviews of the sweet treats that have gone viral.

    Employing brutally honest cookie reviews, skilled networking and aggressive sales tactics, 11-year-old Charlotte McCourt set a new Girl Scout cookie-selling world record by selling 21,477 boxes of cookies, shattering the 35 year old previous record.

    Originally, Charlotte was aiming to sell at least 300 boxes. As part of her effort, McCourt rated all of her cookies on a scale from 1 to 10, and included frankly worded reviews. She then emailed the rankings and reviews of her offerings to her dad's "rich" friend in hopes of swaying him to purchase a bulk of her 300-box goal.

    For example, Charlotte rated the gluten-free Toffee-tastic cookies a , calling them a "bleak, flavorless gluten-free wasteland." She also slammed Do-si-dos as "unoriginal."

    She did praise Samoas, the crisp cookie with shredded coconut, caramel and chocolate, rating them a 9.

    The wealthy pal, who was revealed Wednesday to be Colorado-based venture capitalist Jason Mendelson, was blown away when he received the sales pitch from McCourt.

    Mendelson, childhood friends with McCourt's father, Sean, was sold on her pitch, immediately buying 25 boxes and donating them all to the military.

    "As I'm reading her plea, all I can think is, 'My God, I'm a venture capitalist. I get pitched 30 to 40 times a day. This is an 11-year-old telling me exactly what she wants. There's no beating around the bush,'" he told The Post. "It is a master class on sales," he added.

    Later, Sean's boss, TV personality Mike Rowe, shared the email with his Facebook followers, reading it and cracking up at the gutsy critique. Rowe's video, called "Truth In Advertising!" was uploaded Jan. 25 and has received over 8.4 million views, and triggered thousands of cookie orders for McCourt.

    Read more at: GoodNewNetwork.org



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are two bakers of Girl Scout Cookies - ABC Bakers and Brownie Bakers - and they each make a different gluten free cookie, so what you can get in your area depends on what baker your local council contracts with. Toffee-tastic cookies are made by Brownie Bakers. Last year, our local council switched from Brownie to ABC and...OMG...if you think Toffee-tastic are bad, you should try the "Trios" that ABC makes. I now dream fondly of the wonderful Toffee-tastic cookies we used to get. Trios are a peanut butter, oatmeal, chocolate chip cookie, which, first of all, is a cookie with a multiple personality disorder, but also tastes stale right out of the package, the texture is odd, and it's just...really, really terrible. The ONLY reason I eat any at all is because my daughter is a Girl Scout. If you wait until you're trapped out somewhere with no food and you're really hungry, you can choke them down. rnFor the love of god, Girl Scouts, it can´t be that dang hard to make something that doesn´t completely suck. Sheesh.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I LOVE the Girl Scout Toffee Tastics. I have celiac and it's hard to find ANYTHING that taste good that is a Gluten Free Treat. I had them this year and last year and they were great both times. I never got sick or had GAS from them like I do other gluten-free products. I feel they did a great job making a really tasty product. I hope they can make a sugar free one next. Way to go Girl Scouts!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/12/2014 - Are celebrity claims of weight loss and improved health on a gluten-free diet driving people without celiac disease to temporarily inflate the market for gluten-free foods? Is that market headed for a downtrun if these people go back to gluten?
    The market for gluten-free food has definitely gotten a boost from people looking to gluten-free food to help them lose weight or to improve their health, even though there is no good science to support such claims. More than half of the 90-plus million Americans who follow a gluten-free diet believe the diet to be “healthier” and more than one-quarter do so to lose weight. So what happens if these reasons are not borne out by science, or by experience? Will the market for gluten-free products begin to shrink?
    Fassano thinks this is a possibility, saying that people who embrace “junk” reasons for following a gluten-free diet will likely not follow the diet for a lifetime. He explained that people without celiac disease or gluten-intolerance will only loose weight or become healthier if “they cut out pizza and donuts or other unhealthy foods made with gluten.”
    There’s currently no hard evidence of a downturn in the demand for gluten-free food, but the high percentage of people eating and buying gluten-free for incorrect or whimsical reasons certainly has industry analysts a bit concerned. If a significant portion of those people switch back to gluten-containing foods, the market could see swift shrinkage, and many gluten-free products and offerings might disappear.
    Certainly, people with celiac disease have benefitted from the explosion in gluten-free products, but has the gluten-free diet become too associated with fad dieters and celebrity health claims? Could reduced gluten-free demand have a negative impact on product options for people with celiac disease?
    Source:
    Foodnavigator-usa.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/07/2015 - Girl Scout Cookie season is around the corner, but this year, if you're hoping to get your hands on some of their delicious cookies, including their gluten-free cookie called Toffee-tastic, you might want to get your smartphone out. 
    That's because the Girl Scouts plans to debut a mobile app and a Web platform that offer scouts the ability to sell cookies online, and allows people who want to buy cookies to locate the cookie booth closest to them, without waiting for a knock on the door, or leaving the purchase to a chance encounter.
    In addition to allowing users to find the nearest Girl Scout cookie booth, including the time, date of cookie sales for each location, the app and web platform also allow users to contact their local Girl Scout council, and to view a complete listing of Girl Scout Cookies available in every Zip code across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.
    While most Girl Scout troops nationwide will be using the app and online platform to sell at least some of their cookies online, troops in Chicago are sticking to a traditional sales model, at least for now. So, will the familiar image of Girl Scouts selling cookies door-to-door, or from street corner tables become a thing of the past? Probably not.
    Traditional methods will likely continue, while the app and web platform will offer a “fun, safe, and interactive space for girls to sell cookies,” and learn “vital 21st-century lessons about online marketing, app usage, and ecommerce.”
    So remember, when you buy some cookies from your local Girl Scouts this year, you're also helping young entrepreneurs to master the latest technology to drive sales.
    Girl Scouts of the USA will debut these newest features of the Girl Scout Cookie Program at the January 2015 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) at the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas.
    Download the app, and find Girl Scout Cookies, gluten-free and regular at girlscoutcookies.org.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/25/2016 - There seems to be some confusion about the gluten-free status of Cadbury Creme Eggs. Are Cadbury Creme Eggs gluten-free? The short answer is "not officially," but the full answer is more detailed.
    In the U.S., Cadbury, and Cadbury Easter products are made by Hershey, which does not consider them to be gluten-free. However, Cadbury Creme Eggs contain no gluten ingredients, and their label states that they are manufactured in a plant that also processes tree nuts and peanuts, but not wheat.
    Any Cadbury product processed in a plant that processes wheat products will be clearly labeled. So, this is a case of read the label, and make your own judgement based on your own experience or sensitivity levels.
    The same is true in the UK, where possible allergens are all clearly listed. For example, the UK, the ingredient label for CADBURY DAIRY MILK HOLLOW BUNNY lists an allergen warning that the product MAY CONTAIN NUTS, WHEAT, as do other Cadbury UK products.
    We feel that products containing no wheat or gluten ingredients, and made in a plant that does not process wheat, are likely safe for people on a gluten-free diet.
    At the end of the day, both for Easter candy and for every day candy, it is important to read labels, check manufacturers websites, check ingredients and allergen lists, and to make judgements based on your own judgement about your sensitivity and comfort levels. 
    Accordingly, we have added the following Cadbury products to the SAFE section of our Gluten-free Easter Candy List for 2016. These Cadbury products contain no gluten ingredients, and their allergen label does not list wheat:
    CADBURY USA
    Cadbury Caramel Eggs Cadbury Creme Eggs Cadbury Easter Egg Trail Pack Cadbury Egg Heads Cadbury Orange Creme Eggs CADBURY UK
    Cadbury Caramel Eggs Cadbury Creme Filled Eggs Cadbury Creme Mini Filled Eggs Cadbury Dairy Milk Buttons Chick Cadbury Dairy Milk Mini Filled Eggs Cadbury Dairy Milk Daim Mini Filled Eggs Cadbury Dairy Milk Mousse Bunny Cadbury Mini Eggs While Celiac.com places Cadbury Creme Eggs and several other Cadbury products in the SAFE section of our Gluten-free Easter Candy List for 2016, we do not recommend them for sensitive individuals. We also remind people to make decisions based on their own sensitivity and comfort levels, and to do their own research on any product they intend to consume.
    We have added the following Cadbury products to the UNSAFE section of our Gluten-free Easter Candy List for 2016. These Cadbury products either contain listed gluten ingredients, or their possible allergen label lists wheat:
    CADBURY UK
    Dairy Milk Hollow Milk Chocolate Freddos Dairy Milk Hollow Bunny Dairy Milk Mini Hollow Bunnies Dairy Milk Egg 'N' Spoon Chocolate Dairy Milk Egg 'N' Spoon Vanilla Dairy Milk Oreo Mini Filled Eggs Contact information for CADBURY USA and CADBURY UK.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Forum Discussions

    And he needs to be super strict in his gluten free diet! SUPER strict, not just low gluten. No cross contamination, NONE.  I am so sorry, there are no short cuts with the testing. It flat out sucks but there you have it.  Welcome to the forum!
    Hi TDZ, My understanding is the same, a full gluten challenge is needed for the DH diagnosis.  The method the use for DH is to take a skin biopsy from next to a lesion, not on it.  They check the biopsy for IgA antibodies. I don't know of any way to shortcut the process and avoid eating gluten to get tested.  There may be a test some  day that doesn't require it, but for now I don't think there are any out there. One thing he might not have tried is avoiding iodine.  Some of the m
    Hello, new here and new to the whole thing! My husband has been battling this rash and assorted digestive issues for years. He was diagnosed with contact dermatitis by the dermatologist, had some steroid injections and various creams over the last couple of years, and then in November he went to the ER and they said eczema and gave him steroid pills. This was after a huge bloom that pretty much hit him from head to toe, where it had been mostly arms and legs before. He finally concluded he
×
×
  • Create New...