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    Gluten-friendly and Gluten-Free Candy and Treats for Halloween 2010

    Celiac.com 10/11/2010 - Halloween is upon us again, and for parents of children who must avoid gluten, a simple walk down the store candy aisle can present a daunting challenge: How to know with certainty which candies, especially seasonal candies, are safe for kids on a gluten-free diet?

    The good news this year is that awareness of gluten-sensitivity and gluten-free issues is on the rise, and more parents are demanding gluten-free candy choices. Also, more manufacturers are now identifying their candies as gluten-free, giving parents and trick-or-treaters a wider range of choices.

    It's easy to find gluten-free specialty candies from a reliable source. But, since more mainstream treats are common on Halloween night, it's helpful to know which ones are safe.

    Below you will find the latest gluten-friendly and gluten-free lists of candies which were current as of the date of this article. Below that you will also find a list of unsafe, NON-gluten-free candies, and a partial list of manufacturers with links to their websites. Remember, the list is meant to be used as a gauge, and is not meant to be authoritative or comprehensive. Adjust your vigilance according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.

    Gluten-friendly and Gluten-Free (Safe) Candy and Treats for Halloween

    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate

    A
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead,

    B
    Baby Ruth
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks – “Gluten Free”
    Bit•O•Honey
    Butterfinger fun size
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop + gum

    C
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (lollipops made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew fun size
    Charms Blow Pops
    Charms Candy Carnival Package (Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum)
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks (Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye) – “Gluten Free”
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix (jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and candy characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story)
    Dove pieces (Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate)

    D
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots (candy corn flavored), Ghost Dots (assorted fruit flavored), and Bat Dots (blood orange flavored)
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”

    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix (includes Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops)
    Ferrara Pan Caramels
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix (includes Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots)
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks – “Gluten Free”
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour

    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers

    H
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar snack size
    Hershey’s Kisses - Milk Chocolate Only!!
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate snack size bars (1.55 ounce)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack size bars
    Hot Tamales – “Gluten Free”
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls

    J
    Jelly Belly beans are gluten-free and dairy-free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher lollipops and sticks
    Jr. Mints fun size
    Jujyfruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats

    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet-Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows

    L
    Lemonheads
    LiveSavers Gummies

    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's (all EXCEPT Pretzel M&M's)
    Mars Dove chocolate products (all)
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers & Snickers Dark bars
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) – “Gluten Free.”
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Milk Duds
    Mike and Ike – “Gluten Free”
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack-o-lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars
    Mr. Goodbar

    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit-O-Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (but NOT the Butterfinger Crisp or the Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar-free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets and Sno-Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik-M-Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree

    O
    Operation Gummy Candy

    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy -  maple and roasted peanuts
    Peeps Jack-o-lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats – “Gluten Free”
    Pez candy – “Gluten Free”
    Pop Rocks
    Pixie Stix

    R
    Rain•Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Rolo chocolate covered caramels

    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Crazy Cores fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Sour fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Smarties – the small pastel-colored candies sold in rolls, not Nestle’s chocolate version) – “Contains none of the following: gluten (from wheat, barley, oats and rye), milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy beans.”
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts – “Gluten Free”
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Swedish Fish treat size
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy – “This product is Gluten Free”

    T
    Tootsie Pops (original and miniatures)
    Tootsie Rolls midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Candy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks

    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix-Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix-Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys,
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix (SweetTart Chews were OK, but other packages in the bag were labeled with a cross-contamination warning. See list below.)

    X
    X-scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers – “Gluten Free”

    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins

    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones (fruit flavored hard candy)


    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten-free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.

    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN GLUTEN:

    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour

    ANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour

    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten-free

    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers –  contains barley malt and wheat flour
    MARS and WRIGLEY

    Milky Way –  contains barley malt
    Twix –  contains wheat

    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp –  contains wheat flour
    Crunch –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten-free.

    WONKA
    Sweetarts Gummy Bugs –  contains wheat/gluten
    Sweetarts Rope –  contains wheat/gluten
    Oompas
    Wonka Bar


    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:

    Other resources:

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    I'm searching for a gluten free candy corn. I've been looking since the end of August and so far, nothing. Any one know where I can find some???

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    I'm searching for a gluten free candy corn. I've been looking since the end of August and so far, nothing. Any one know where I can find some???

    Hey Amanda. Me too! Please let us know if you find any and I'll do the same. A childhood favorite that I miss this time of year!

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    You forgot to mention that although the Milky Way bar is NOT gluten free, the MILKY WAY MIDNIGHT bar IS gluten free as it doesn't contain the barley and its delicious!!!

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    Guest priscilla matuson

    Posted

    I'm searching for a gluten free candy corn. I've been looking since the end of August and so far, nothing. Any one know where I can find some???

    Jelly Belly/Goelitz Candy Corn is gluten free.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    This article appeared in the Autumn 2007 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Celiac.com 03/10/2008 - Virtually every parent and every professional person who works with children wants to see them learn, grow, and achieve to the greatest extent of their potential.  The vast majority of these caregivers know that nutrition plays an enormous role in each child’s realizing their potential.  Unfortunately, that is where agreement ends.  There are almost as many perspectives on what constitutes a healthy diet as there are people on this planet.  Some claim that the healthiest diet is that of a vegetarian which almost invariably leads to a heavy reliance on grains and which is devoid of vitamin B12.  Others assert, based on cardiovascular disease being our number one killer that the best diet includes the smallest amount of fats.  They believe that fat consumption is related to blood cholesterol levels and that blood cholesterol levels are the best predictor of heart attacks.  Yet low cholesterol has been linked to increased cancer risk.  Still others argue for the health benefits conferred by a high protein diet.  They point out the importance of proteins in providing the building blocks for immune system function and the body’s maintenance and repair at the cellular level.  A small but growing faction points to the health benefits of a diet dominated by fats with little or no carbohydrate content.  Other diets target refined sugars and flours as problematic.  Added to this diversity, there is a plethora of dietary perspectives that advocate rigid proportions of fat, protein, and carbohydrates.  The proportions of each component vary according to the data that is given the most credence by the creators and advocates of each diet.  Many dietary rituals have grown up around cancer avoidance or therapy, weight loss strategies, treatments for cardiovascular disease or its avoidance, and autoimmune diseases.  Book, video tape, audio tape, menu guides, and other media sales are just a starting point.  Some advocates of specific dietary strategies are even selling special foods that comply with their recommendations.  The profit motive can be a powerful factor in creating bias.  Then there are the government sponsored healthy eating guides.  Of course, each paradigm assumes that one diet can be recommended for all people.  The USDA has recently devised recommendations that do make concessions to gender and stage-of-life (with separate recommendations for children, adults, and seniors) but even with these changes, the USDA provides a clear message advocating plenty of grains and little fat.  It is difficult to determine just how much these recommendations have been influenced by special interest lobbies.  Agricultural and food production corporations have made astronomical investments in current dietary practices and shaping new dietary trends.  Is it reasonable to expect them to be responsive to evolving research findings?  
    Those of us who have experienced the painful shock that we were ill, sometimes deathly ill, from grain proteins that come highly recommended by government food guides, have had to revise our views of healthy eating and reject such flawed guidance.  Gluten sensitivity and celiac disease often crop up in the context of what many health care professionals tout as a healthy diet.  Prior to my own diagnosis of celiac disease, I remember one physician recommending that I eat bran every morning to reverse some of the gastrointestinal problems I was having.  He would not believe that eating bran made me vomit.  There is a persistent sense that we should all know what constitutes a good diet.  Almost every one of us who have to avoid gluten knows that avoiding it is a healthy choice for us, irrespective of government or private sector recommendations for healthy eating.  We have learned not to trust these prescriptions filled with certitude and rigidity.  We have found new-found health in eating habits that are diametrically opposed to those recommendations.
     
    Thus, many of us will have a very different view of conventional dietary wisdom.  For instance, Dr. Eve Roberts, a scientist at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children, was quoted on Monday, September 24th in the Victoria Times Colonist as saying: “I do not want children to grow up with liver disease because we forgot to tell them how to eat” (1).  I’m sure that same attitude abounds throughout the medical profession.  Unfortunately, despite the overwhelming consensus that children should not suffer such diet-induced illnesses, there is little agreement on exactly what we should be telling children (or adults for that matter) to help them avoid fatty liver disease.  The medical literature provides research reports of several contradictions on this point. 
    In fact, contradictions abound throughout the medical literature.  So how are we to choose a healthy diet? What can we teach our children about eating well? For those of us who are gluten sensitive or have celiac disease, gluten avoidance is a given.  For our children, the answer is less clear.  They will be at greater risk of having celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, but what should we teach them about these grains? Should they avoid gluten entirely? Should they eat normally until they become ill—perhaps risking permanent neurological damage or a deadly cancer? Should they be constantly vigilant with regular blood tests, endoscopies, or IgG allergy testing?
    Many of us have been told to “just eat a balanced diet”.  It sounds appealing, but it is so vague as to provide little meaningful direction.  What is a healthy diet and how do we judge if any special interest group is more interested in health than profits? Just how much can we trust information that has a price tag attached to it? Somebody is profiting.  Can they really provide objective guidance? These questions should form part of our search for information.  There is nothing wrong with making a profit or earning a living from providing dietary advice.  However, it is important to be aware of any possible conflicts of interest.  
    For these reasons, I have developed my own strategy for determining what advice and guidance I can provide to my children and grandchildren.  I acknowledge that this approach is limited by my own biases, my finite capacity for assimilating and synthesizing information, my incomplete familiarity with nutritional research, and my own personal experiences.  On the other hand, I don’t have to worry about being directly influenced by profiteering or lobby groups diverting me from my primary purpose.
    On that basis, I have proceeded to explore my own dietary program.  I have conducted some trial-and-error experiments on myself, and I have read as extensively as my part-time avocation of dietary investigation permits.  From this, I have learned to trust my own gut.  If something doesn’t feel right in my stomach, I avoid it.  I have also learned to trust my sense of smell.  If a food does not smell appetizing to me, I don’t eat it.  I suspect that this is a tool that evolution has provided us with to determine what is and is not safe to eat.  Those without it probably stopped contributing to the human gene pool.  I have learned that IgG allergy testing is an effective tool with which I can reduce the lengthy trial-and-error process necessary for identifying the majority of allergies.  I realize that this testing has its weaknesses, but so does almost every other form of medical testing.  I have come to accept that as long as human beings are involved, we will have imperfect testing, regardless of claims to the contrary.  Finally, although I try to read critically, I read medical and scientific research reports to stay abreast of new findings and gain a better understanding of this complex field.
    The tentative conclusions I have reached, pending new information, are as follows:

    Gluten grains probably aren’t very good for people.  They are highly allergenic affecting at least 10% of the general population, and perhaps as much as 40%  of the population.  These grains also contain opioids morphine-like substances that can be highly addictive and have a deleterious effect on our ability to resist cancer.  They also contain large quantities of starch that is converted very rapidly into sugars. The evidence suggests that refined sugars and starchy foods cause many of our problems with obesity, vision problems due to growth related distortions of the eyeball, type II diabetes, and hypoglycemia.  Dairy products probably aren’t very good for anyone either.  They are also highly allergenic and contain opioids similar to those found in gluten.  Further, about two thirds of the world’s adult populations are lactose intolerant.  They don’t retain enzymes for digesting milk sugars after childhood. I think it is wise to avoid processed foods where possible.  The more they’ve been processed, the further they are from the state in which we evolved eating them. I believe it is a good idea to avoid eating soy because it has been linked to neurological diseases and other health problems that I don’t want to develop. I avoid foods to which IgG blood testing has shown to cause an immune reaction in me. I try to avoid juices, as these are mostly sugar.  Those are the things I try to avoid.  On a more positive note, there are several specific strategies that I try to follow:
    I take supplements of vitamins and minerals which evidence has shown that I either absorb poorly or have been depleted from the soils in which my food is grown. I try to eat whole fruits and vegetables. I try to eat when I am hungry—not according somebody else’s idea of appropriate mealtimes. If I am ever diagnosed with cancer, I will follow a ketogenic diet.  That is a diet that is dominated by fats, includes about 30% protein, and includes no carbohydrates.  I have tried this diet for about a month.  I can’t say that I enjoy it very much, but I’d be happy to forego the pleasure of carbohydrates if my life is at stake.
    I’m very grateful to my wife who works very hard at finding tasty treats so I don’t have to feel isolated or deprived in social situations where food is consumed.
    I’m convinced that even a little exercise is a critical feature of a well balanced diet, but that belongs in another column.
    I realize that these strategies are often impractical and I don’t pretend to live up to all of them, except for gluten and dairy avoidance.  I also suspect that I would be better off if I ate organic fruits and vegetables along with range fed meat.  I also suspect that I should avoid any genetically modified food.  We really don’t know what’s in that stuff! I haven’t reached the point yet where I am sufficiently motivated to change my diet to that extent, although I do realize that it would probably be a good idea.  I am convinced that Dr. Barry Sears is onto something when he advocates specific proportions of each food type for optimal health and performance.  Unfortunately, my diet is already complex enough that without some specific and highly motivating reason, I’m just too busy or lazy to be bothered with measuring such things.  I just let my taste buds and availability (my wife only cooks one cake at a time) determine my portion sizes.This is the balanced diet I recommend.  I sorely doubt that my children or my grandchildren follow my advice, except when they visit during mealtimes.  However I am confident that such a diet, should they choose to accept it, will not cause them to self-destruct due to dietary disease.


    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 01/07/2009 - To help you make 2009 the happiest and healthiest year ever, the staff at Celiac.com has come up with 10 simple tips that we hope will help you stay gluten-free all year long.

    Toss Out any Unsafe Foods
    The beginning of the year is a great time to go through your cupboards to make sure that any gluten-containing food that might have snuck into the house over the holidays is banished forever. Still have that fruitcake from your well-meaning aunt who forgot about your gluten-free diet? Toss it…or, maybe better, re-gift it to one of your gluten-eating friends (or enemies depending on the quality of the fruitcake!).
    Restock your Kitchen
    Plan to include a gluten-free shopping list in that first grocery purchase to help you replace any depleted favorite gluten-free ingredients. The start of the year is a great time to re-stock your kitchen with your favorite gluten-free foods and ingredients. Take Advantage of Sales/Specials to Stock up on Gluten-free Favorites
    Numerous online companies are eager to make way for 2009, and offer great deals on your gluten-free favorites. Whether it’s breads, pizzas, pizza crusts and mixes by companies like Chebe, Dad’s, Schar, Foods By George, or ‘Cause Your Special, now is a perfect time to stock up and save big. Source Products from Reliable Makers and Vendors
    The ‘gluten-free’ label is becoming a hot commodity, with the market for gluten-free products growing at double-digit rates, and consumer demand higher than ever. However, until the U.S. government implements official standards, there is no official definition as to what constitutes a gluten-free product, so it’s buyer beware! So it’s best to buy your gluten-free products from trusted companies and sources. Look for companies that have a long history and are vigilant about protecting their customers. One of our favorites is the The Gluten-Free Mall, which has provided on-line shopping for such products since 1998.
    Stay Informed
    Follow the latest Gluten-Free developments. From clinical trials of a vaccine for celiac disease, to the pending U.S. adoption of the Codex Alimentarius standards for gluten-free labeling, to major developments in diagnosis, treatment, associated conditions, etc., there’s plenty happening in the gluten-free world, so be sure to follow any news that might have a positive affect on your health and gluten-free lifestyle. You can follow your favorite authors and news on Celiac.com by setting up our Celiac.com RSS feed in your Google or Yahoo! account.  Or even better still, subscribe to a celiac disease or gluten-free newsletter such as Celiac.com’s paper newsletter, and help support us at the same time. Double-Check Safe and Unsafe Gluten-Free Food Lists
    You can find free updated lists at Celiac.com. Another good option is to purchase a commercial gluten-free shopping guide, which can help you find items at a regular grocery store that are safe.
    Take Part in Food Planning for 2009 Events
    From post-New Year’s parties to the Super Bowl and beyond, now is a good time to look at the year ahead with an eye toward any events you’ll likely be attending and to make a mental note to chime in ahead of time with hosts to arrange for any gluten-free adjustments. This includes arranging to bring gluten-free versions of any favorite or ‘must-have’ dishes. Think Ahead: Plan and Try Gluten-free Dishes in Advance
    Think back to the few disappointments you may have suffered at one of last year’s parties or picnics. Maybe it was the company get-together, maybe it was your cousin’s Superbowl party or Memorial Day BBQ, where there just wasn’t enough gluten-free snacks to nourish you properly. Don’t get caught short again. Now is a perfect time to look ahead and mark your calendar for the events you know will be coming. Then mark your calendar again for a date far enough in advance of those events for you to prepare and try out the gluten-free offerings that will help to make those events a gluten-free success! Try new Gluten-free Products!
    With the market for gluten-free foods projected to grow at double-digits through foreseeable future, the number of gluten-free products hitting the market is also swelling. Since 2004, food retailers have added nearly 2,500 new gluten-free products to their shelves. In 2008 alone, retailers added nearly 750 new gluten-free products. Trying new gluten-free products is a great way to discover new products, and new manufacturers, and to enjoy eating gluten-free. Spread the Word
    Generally speaking, a gluten-free diet is a healthy diet. On the whole, people who eat gluten-free automatically avoid a huge number of foods containing enriched wheat flour that pervades our food chain, and is often found in combination with other questionable ingredients like hydrogenated oils, high-fructose corn syrup, preservatives, etc. Eating gluten-free generally means paying closer attention to ingredients, eating foods made with a variety of whole grains, like quinoa, rice, corn, and millet, along with more fruits, and vegetables. A gluten-free diet is an invitation to a healthier lifestyle. Spread the word!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/29/2013 - The worldwide market for gluten-free products market will continue to grow, reaching $6.2 billion by 2018, according to a new report from Markets and Markets.
    Gluten-free bakery and confectionery products represent 46% of total gluten-free product sales, followed by gluten-free snacks at 20%.
    The North American market racked up about 59% of total global gluten-free sales, according to the report.
    Conventional sales channels accounted for the highest volume of of global gluten-free product sales.
    Also, the trends show that major gluten-free players like Hain Celestial, Inc., General Mills, Inc., Amy’s Kitchen, Inc. and Boulder Brands will continue to have a heavy market presence into the foreseeable future.
    Source:
    foodbusinessnews.net

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/07/2015 - Girl Scout Cookie season is around the corner, but this year, if you're hoping to get your hands on some of their delicious cookies, including their gluten-free cookie called Toffee-tastic, you might want to get your smartphone out. 
    That's because the Girl Scouts plans to debut a mobile app and a Web platform that offer scouts the ability to sell cookies online, and allows people who want to buy cookies to locate the cookie booth closest to them, without waiting for a knock on the door, or leaving the purchase to a chance encounter.
    In addition to allowing users to find the nearest Girl Scout cookie booth, including the time, date of cookie sales for each location, the app and web platform also allow users to contact their local Girl Scout council, and to view a complete listing of Girl Scout Cookies available in every Zip code across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.
    While most Girl Scout troops nationwide will be using the app and online platform to sell at least some of their cookies online, troops in Chicago are sticking to a traditional sales model, at least for now. So, will the familiar image of Girl Scouts selling cookies door-to-door, or from street corner tables become a thing of the past? Probably not.
    Traditional methods will likely continue, while the app and web platform will offer a “fun, safe, and interactive space for girls to sell cookies,” and learn “vital 21st-century lessons about online marketing, app usage, and ecommerce.”
    So remember, when you buy some cookies from your local Girl Scouts this year, you're also helping young entrepreneurs to master the latest technology to drive sales.
    Girl Scouts of the USA will debut these newest features of the Girl Scout Cookie Program at the January 2015 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) at the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas.
    Download the app, and find Girl Scout Cookies, gluten-free and regular at girlscoutcookies.org.

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