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    Gluten in Meth? Really?


    Jefferson Adams


    • No, there is not any gluten in meth.


    Image Caption: There is no gluten in meth. Photo: CC--JayW51

    Celiac.com 11/25/2016 - First of all, if you are using methamphetamine, gluten is probably the least of your worries. Seriously.


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    But what about rumors and articles circulating that suggest that meth contains gluten, and that said gluten might make an already dangerous drug much word for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance? Is there really gluten in meth? The short answer is no, gluten in meth is not a thing. Meth does not contain gluten.

    To the best of our knowledge this latest bit of misinformation comes from an article published in the ThatOregonLife.com, and constitutes an attempt at humor.

    According to the article, "Health experts have today warned that meth found on the streets of Portland has tested positive for gluten, a protein composite normally found in several types of grains, including wheat, spelt, rye, and barley." The article goes on to say that a group called Action on Gluten is working to eliminate gluten from meth within a year.

    According to the article, the group's spokesperson, Simon Krueger explained that "Gluten is not only dangerous, but also highly addictive. When added to meth, an otherwise fairly safe drug, the consequences can be deadly." 

    What some readers may fail to notice, however, is that the article appears in the magazine's "Satire" section, and is undoubtedly tongue in cheek. The article appears alongside other obviously satirical articles, such as one claiming that President-elect Donald Trump has recently announced his plans to build a marijuana-themed hotel in notorious hippy enclave of Eugene, Oregon.

    So, anyone who actually believes meth contains gluten can credit their misconception ThatOregonLife.com.

    Once again, as a public service announcement. People should absolutely not use meth, but meth certainly does not contain gluten.


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    REALLY!!!! So now all the meth heads can rest assured they won't intake gluten when they get high!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/13/2015 - In addition to being a common ingredient in many commercial food products, gluten is also used in numerous medications, supplements, and vitamins, often as an inert ingredient known as an excipient.
    Because chronic gluten-related inflammation and damage impairs absorption of nutrients, and likely causes malabsorption of oral medications, it is extremely important for people with celiac disease to review the nutrition labels of all foods and beverages, as well as the package inserts (PI) for information about gluten content.
    Most oral medications depend on absorption through the small intestine via passive diffusion. GI-tract damage may shift this diffusion process into systemic circulation, which can result in increased or decreased absorption, depending on the drug molecules.
    Since drug molecules have varying and unique chemical properties, it is hard to determine the exact means of drug absorption in celiac patients, and also hard to determine the impact of celiac disease on drug absorption.
    Based on their molecular properties, researchers suspect the absorption of a number of drugs is impaired by gluten sensitivity.
    These drugs include: acetaminophen, aspirin, indomethacin, levothyroxine, prednisolone, propranolol, and certain antibiotics.
    For these reasons, it is important for doctors to monitor serum drug levels for medications with narrow therapeutic indexes in people with celiac disease. If you have celiac disease, please let your doctor know before you take these drugs.
    Source:
    US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/29/2016 - To remain healthy, people with celiac disease must follow a strict gluten-free diet. Good availability of gluten-free foods is critical to this. High prices or limited availability can have a greater impact on celiac patients from lower socioeconomic conditions in regards to their ability to follow a gluten-free treatment diet.
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess the availability and cost of gluten-free food in UK supermarkets and via the internet. The researchers included M Burden, PD Mooney, RJ Blanshard, WL White, DR Cambray-Deakin, and DS Sanders. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Department of Gastroenterology at Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, UK, and with the University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK.
    Their team analyzed data from supermarkets and internet shops delivering to homes in the city of Sheffield, UK, between February and March 2014. They used comprehensive internet searches to identify stores, and analyzed the costs of ten commonly purchased items, and then compared those with standard non-gluten-free alternatives. They also directly measured and compared the number of gluten-free foods available between stores, which were categorized according to previously published work.
    None of the budget supermarkets surveyed stocked any gluten-free foods. Premium and full-service supermarkets stocked the greatest gluten-free range, with an average of 22 items (IQR 39, p<0.0001). They found that when a store did stock gluten-free products, those products were, on average, at least four times more expensive than the non-gluten-free alternatives (p<0.0001). Gluten-free products are prevalent online, but half of the ten products surveyed were significantly more expensive than gluten-free equivalents in supermarkets.
    These results show that, for Sheffield at least, gluten-free foods are overall readily accessible, but also significantly more expensive than online versions, or comparable non-gluten-free store items. Still, that changes if you're in a low income neighborhood. Gluten-free food access was poor in low-income neighborhoods, as budget supermarkets stocked no gluten-free foods. This poor availability and added cost is likely to impact food availability and gluten-free diet adherence in low-income groups.
    These results are for one city in the UK, but they are likely not too different than results would be in the US. Access to gluten-free food becomes more difficult in poorer neighborhoods, and it's always more expensive than non-gluten-free food.
    Source:
    Postgrad Med J. 2015 Nov;91(1081):622-6. doi: 10.1136/postgradmedj-2015-133395. Epub 2015 Aug 26.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/25/2016 - In a scandal that is shaping up to resemble the story of Paul Seelig, who sold "gluten-free" baked goods that were actually regular baked goods merely labeled "gluten-free," an Ohio couple is suing their local pizzeria for serving "gluten-free" pizza that they claim was just regular pizza labeled as gluten-free.
    According to court documents, the Reynoldsburg, Ohio couple claims that, on April 11, 2014, they bought a pie from Donatos Pizza at 7580 East Broad Street in Reynoldsburg. The couple claims that the pizza was advertised as gluten-free, but was made with standard pizza dough, which contains wheat flour.
    The couple is seeking compensation for nearly $9,000 in medical expenses, nearly $4,000 in lost wages and unspecified future damages.
    The lawsuit was filed Monday in Franklin County. According to court documents, Donatos has not yet been served its copy of the lawsuit.
    Stay tuned for more details on this and other stories about gluten-free issues.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/04/2016 - With all the hype about gluten-free diets going around, it's only natural that dog owners might wonder about potential benefits of a gluten-fee diet for their pet. Before rushing out and spending money on a bunch of new gluten-free grub for Fido, it's wise to first ask a few questions.
    First, figure out whether the dog is sensitive to gluten from wheat, barley, oats or rye, or if the dog is sensitive to grains including soy and corn. It's also possible that the dog has no sensitivities to the current food.
    Most dogs do not suffer from celiac disease, so a gluten-free diet is not necessary, nor will it be likely to improve the dog's health in any way. There are, however, some important exceptions. For example, Irish setters and dogs with Irish setter genetics can suffer from hereditary gluten intolerance. Gluten-sensitivity affects only a minority of Irish setters, but it does exist, and it's important to address in pets with symptoms.
    Gluten sensitivity is also a factor in epileptoid cramping in Border Terriers, so be on the lookout if your Border Terrier suffers from epilepsy-like cramping or seizures.
    While any dog may develop food sensitivities, some breeds are more predisposed than others. Boston terriers are often allergic to products containing corn or gluten, resulting in skin issues, or atopic dermatitis. Switching to a corn-free, wheat-free food can lead to significant improvements.
    The main point to remember is that even gluten-free dog food, with no wheat, barley, oats or rye, can still contain soy or corn, while many dog foods labeled as 'grain-free' happen to also be gluten-free.
    Dog foods that omit grains often contain other high-carbohydrate ingredients, such as sweet potato or tapioca. Whether grain intolerance, or gluten-intolerance is the problem, it is important to read the dog food label, and to slowly and carefully test out any new foods before switching over completely.
    Also, even though some dogs are allergic to grains, other ingredients, especially beef and dairy, are far more likely to trigger allergic skin reactions.
    Here are some top dog-food brands that offer gluten-free options that contain ingredients less likely to cause allergies. Remember, dogs have individual tastes and preferences. Some dogs will prefer and do better with some foods than others, no matter how highly rated the food. Obviously let your dog help guide you on this.
    A dog's needs also vary according to life stage. When you change dog foods, do so over a period of several days. So, it's best to try small samples at a time, and make the full switch to a new food slowly. Even the best new food may upset a dog's digestive system if it's not given time to adjust.
    Choosing the wrong food for your dog, or forcing a change too quickly can leave both you and the dog unsatisfied. That may be why even the highest quality dog foods can have unsatisfied customers posting poor reviews of a particular item.
    To help you with your search, here's a list of Top Ten Grain Free Dog Food Brands from Heavy.com.
    Here's a list of Top Five Grain Free Dog Food Brands from thealternativedaily.com.
    Here's the list of best Brands of Canned Grain-free Dog Foods, including tubs or cups, according to dogfoodadvisor.com.
    Lastly, here's a list of best Brands of Dry Grain Free Dog Foods, including dehydrated or freeze-dried, according to dogfoodadvisor.com. 

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
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    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
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    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
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    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.