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    Gluten Sensitivity and Bladder Disease


    Wendy Cohan

    Celiac.com 08/28/2008 - Gluten intolerance can affect all the mucous membranes of the body in sensitive individuals, including the bladder lining.  I was diagnosed in 1996 with an incurable, progressive, painful disease called interstitial cystitis.  The symptoms mimic those of a bad bladder infection, although most lab tests are negative for bacteria, and antibiotics generally do not help.  I knew as a nurse how the bladder functions, and that it needs to have an intact lining to tolerate holding all the toxic wastes of the body prior to elimination.  It made sense to me to try a dietary approach, and I had good luck immediately by excluding from my diet known bladder irritants like tomatoes, caffeine, chocolate, citrus, and alcohol, even though most doctors at the time gave diet little credit for a reduction in symptoms.   Nevertheless, the disease did progress over time, and I eventually needed to take pain medications, anti-spasmodics, and other medications to enable me to function.  Every urine test showed that I had significant amounts of blood in my urine.  No one ever tested me for food allergies, gluten intolerance, or considered any other possible cause.  No one suggested that my symptoms were part of a systemic dysfunction in my body.  I had a painful disease, and they would give me as much pain medicine as I wanted, but there was no cure.


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    I was no longer getting enough sleep to enable me to function well as a nurse.  I made the choice to stop working for a few years to concentrate on rebuilding my health.  I was in constant pain.  It was about this time that I began turning to alternative practitioners for help, and started experimenting with my diet, as well as having food allergy and sensitivity testing done.  I had some success eliminating the swelling in my pelvic area using castor oil packs, enough so that when I had increased swelling from eating a particular food, I could tell the difference.  Careful observation showed me what did and did not negatively affect my bladder.  Eliminating gluten resolved a long-standing rash on my legs, called dermatitis herpetiformis, and after about two years and a lot of alternative bodywork, my bladder began to significantly recover.  It was the first area to show symptoms, and the last to recover.

    Now, twelve years after my interstitial cystitis diagnosis, my urologist readily agrees that gluten negatively affects the bladder in some portion of her patients, and that eliminating gluten leads to a reduction in symptoms. All of my urine tests are perfectly normal and I sleep at night.  Still, there are almost no published journal articles linking gluten intolerance and the bladder. I am trying to get the word out there, specifically, the idea that we do not have to live with constant pain, and that what we eat can affect our health.

    My future goals include beginning an informal clinical trial in the form of a support group for patients willing to try a gluten-free diet as a treatment for chronic bladder symptoms.  If anyone is interested in the link between bladder symptoms and gluten sensitivity, I have pages of anecdotes gathered from many people who have experienced healing on a gluten-free diet.

    The Connection Between Bladder Symptoms And Gluten Sensitivity - A Collection Of Personal Experiences*

    *Names have been changed to initials to protect individualsprivacy.The author has the originalweb-posts or other identifying information. A summary of web posts from icpuzzle@yahoogroups.com and intersitialcystitischronicpain@yahoogroups.com and personal communications revealing strong evidence of a connection between bladder symptoms and gluten sensitivity. This article is an adjunct/follow-up to the above article on gluten sensitivity and bladder disease.

    • …”The main help came from W.’ssuggestion to try to eliminate wheat-barley-rye (gluten).The Elmiron was getting close it it’s maxwithout constantly abusing the situation with gluten…about three months ago Istarted eliminating gluten-carrying grains, “wallah” absolutely the mostsignificant change started happening about 3 or 4 days from the last day ofgluten.  How much better am I now sincethen – about 500% better (close to where I was when I first noticed the IC,even though I didn’t know what was happening – close to TWENTY YEARS AGO).  I am still of the opinion that some kind ofcritters have and maybe still play a part of this.  I have taken every kind of antibiotic, with alittle success now and then, but not enough to kill it.”
    • “It took about 3 months to seemild improvement, about a year to see moderate improvement, and about 2 yearsto feel much better.  I am not 100percent symptom free, but most of the time I am a very manageable level ofsymptoms, and when I flare (from diet or sex) it is very short lived.I am down to one Elmiron a day (from theoriginal dose of 3) and I also do a gluten and sugar free version of the ICdiet, which I also think has helped me a lot.”
    • “I have had IC for 30 yearspretty severely.  It was only this pastyears that I got tested …and found out I had a severe wheat-gluten allergy tothe point that I cannot ingest one bite of anything with wheat or gluten…theysaid my whole digestive tract was inflamed…Over the years I knew I was wheat,dairy, and sugar intolerant but these (latest) tests are more specific and letyou know the levels.  I feel muchstronger and have many days when I am symptom free.  I finally feel different.”
    • “I have started cutting wheat andgluten out of my diet, its been about 2 weeks now.  I, like M., have IBS.  I am feeling better every day.I am following a diet very similar toyours.Thank you for posting it again!”
    • “I have had IC for over adecade.  I have been on a gluten freediet for over 6 years and that has been the only thing that has given me anyrelief from the IC.  I no longer take anymeds at all – haven’t even been to a doctor for the IC in several years.Glad to hear someone else is seeing thebenefits of the gluten-free diet for IC and getting the word out.  I would definitely suggest anyone with ICgive it a try.  It definitely gave me mylife back."
    • “Where have you been for the lasttwenty plus years?You may have saved mylife.I have described these symptomsfor years to doctors and never got an answer that sounded even close to whatwas happening.  Just “try these antibiotics”once in a while at the beginning (there was minimal change), but more and morethe antibiotics got more and more expensive with less and less effect if any atall, it even included the kill-all antibiotic – kills everything except me…Went to nerve doctor ($2,500 plus, pelvic x-rays (2 or 3 types).One of the urologists… never said anythingbut “prostatitis” over and over again. My head now also has a nearperfectly clear thinking ability, before it was always a bit cloudy even thoughI may not have been totally aware of it.The feel of carrying extra weight is now almost gone. The gluten issue may not be theonly issue I have – prostatitis is likely to be part of the pain problem, butthere is no question that the gluten issue has been a very, very large part andis now subsiding.”
    • “I was tested for glutenintolerance but it came out negative but while I awaited results I went gluten free and I felt so goodI never went back.  I have had a lot ofimprovement going gluten and sugar free as well.I can find rice pasta, lasagna etc.easily.  It’s amazing how you don’t haveto try hard to substitute (for) it.”
    • “I have gone from having to gowith urgency every 5 to 10 minutes and being in constant pain (especially atnight) to having almost no symptoms.   I am not “cured”.  I am still working on healing.  I occasionally have a mild flare.  Gradually I am able to add foods back into mydiet – a very different diet than before.  Whole foods, more veggies, only whole grains (no wheat), no sugar, and anoverall more alkaline diet….There is help.  There is hope.”
    • “I am just into the first severalchapters of the book (Solving the IC Puzzle, by Amrit Willis, R.N.), but wantedto stop and ask if there were any people who were celiac or gluten intolerant thatalso suffer from IC.  In my celiacsgroup, there are quite a few that have celiacs that (also) have IC.Autoimmune – allergy – poor lifestyle choices– toxic body – all related.  So, I amwondering if there are others in this IC group that are glutenintolerant/celiacs or who have suffered from, have, or have healed fromautoimmune diseases…”
    • “I have celiac disease also.  I was diagnosed via a blood test about 4months before the IC thing came to a head.  I disregarded the doctor’s warning to stay away from gluten/wheat.I went to a gastroenterologist because I feltlike I was having a stomach flu every 2 weeks.  So I saw this guy and he gave me the blood test results (which Iignored) until finally, I felt so bad I decided to whit the gluten/wheat.I had a friend who has celiac really severelyand she told me that I might as well cancel my hydrodistention to test for ICbecause eliminating wheat/gluten might clear everything up for me.  Unfortunately, I had thehydrodistention which made me much worse, IC-wise….Sorry for the long-windedanswer.I finally stopped taking theElmiron…So far so good.I really don’texpect to have a problem.  It was justhard letting go.  I don’t know which came first(the celiac or the IC).Looking back,every time I drank beer I always felt bloated right away.  Classic example, on our way to skiing, wewould stop for two beers.  Relievingmyself before getting back in the car, I would be dying for the bathroom beforewe reached our destination, 45 minutes later.  I though this was normal.Isuppose it was the celiac and IC kicking in. Too bad it would take 10 years and 3 pregnancies later to diagnose it…”
    • “I have been diagnosed withgluten sensitivity and am gluten-free.  Since I was already eating very little in the way of grains at mynutritionist’s urging, I don’t find the diet that difficult to follow.I try to be very careful.”
    • “I agree with these 2 types ofpastas.  I also find that when I eatwheat (which is an allergy I have) that my bladder gets irritated…”
    • “…So, W. your IC is totally goneright now – especially after cutting out gluten?  I have known for years and years that I wasgluten sensitive as whenever I wouldn’t eat gluten or wheat, if I just atevegetables and protein my stomach would be soooo quiet.Hindsight is 20/20 – just wish I would havegiven up gluten years ago and maybe this wouldn’t have happened.  I am checking into pelvic floortherapy and will have that done along with many other things – I am soterrified of this getting worse, absolutely scared to death.  Thanks for your words ofencouragement and comfort.”
    • (Personal Communication)“Suddenly some of the mysteriesof what's been called my "wheat intolerance"or "allergy" were resolved.  In particular, I no longer thinkI'm crazy for suspecting a link between my 2.5-year-long urinary tract infection and the onset of my moreobviously wheat-related symptoms. Thanks so much for getting theword out, and sharing your experience!”
    • (Personal Communication) “I about fell off my chair when Iread about your bladder stuff.  I've seen 3 specialists (including adigestive doc and a urologist!!), a regular PCP, and a naturopath, andnone of them were willing to consider a link between wheat issues and my poorbladder's troubles. It was like the world lifted offmy shoulders - I'm not crazy!  And my body is not the wreck I thought itwas at the ripe old age of 31!Seems funny to be exultant aboutprobably having celiac disease, but that's whatI've been since.”
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    Guest krista

    Posted

    Thank you for writing this. I have had the same experience. Most doctors here don't recognize the effect that gluten can have on bladder and kidney function. Or any other organ other than the small intestines. I hope they wake up soon it would save so many from so much pain.

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    I have both IC and a wheat allergy, which I ignored and was paying the price with the severe pain with IC. Absolutely nothing was working and of course no doctor would hear of it being related. Several have told me that diet would not solve anything. *right* That was until the total experience with dermatitis (celiac) forced me to be gluten free and it has completely stopped the IC pain. It's nothing short of a miracle to have my life back. I can actually plan to leave the house now, where I couldn't before without a serious map to all bathrooms in all stores on the route.

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    Thanks for sharing this information and glad your health improved. I did not have bladder irritation or infection, but I did have stress incontinence. I was told that was 'normal' for a 60 year old woman. When I went Gluten Free 5 years ago, my incontinence disappeared.

     

    Interesting aside is my dog was urinating in her sleep and when I started her on a Gluten Free diet, she no longer does this.

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    Thank you for sharing this. I used to get frequent bladder infections that were prone to quickly creeping up into my kidneys. After going gluten-free more than a year ago, I have only had one, and that was right after diagnosis. I've never gone that long without a UTI since my first one 11 years ago!

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    Thank you so much for this informative article. I've spent the last month with a urologist testing me to figure out what was wrong. The first thing I asked him was if there is any relation to my celiac disease...of course not! All my tests (over $4000) came back negative. He told me that something was wrong, but he just could not figure it out. So he wanted to put me on a daily dose of antibiotics to solve my problems. No thank you. I have piece of mind again! Thank you!

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    Its a comfort to hear that there are others out there with the same conditions as I have. I have both IC and Celiac. I am 23 and have have dealt with pain for half of my life and fear that their will never be an end to it. Though I try really hard to stick to the diet it is hard, especially when all my friends like to drink and eat out a lot. I have tried to deal without pain medications but it seems the only way to get through the day. Its hard to deal with life when everyone feels sorry for you but no one understand the day to day trails I go through. I have to say reading the article made me feel a little better to remember I am not alone. Thanks for the small comfort you gave me.

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    Guest Heather Tupper

    Posted

    OMG! I'm so weirdly happy to read this. I also have IC and once I finally found out I was a Celiac, my symptoms also improved. It's so nice not to think I'm a TOTAL freak. Thank you!

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    Guest Frieda Christianson

    Posted

    Working through a lot of this information on my own--this sure helps the self-learned.

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    Yes! I suspected a connection. Celiac is in my family - I asked for testing - they said I wasn't thin enough. Finally I went gluten-free on my own. This cleared up my constant UTI's, hives on my legs and lower abdomen, bleeding gums, and all the intestinal distress! It's been 15 months now and I'm feeling better each day.

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    I was diagnosed with Celiacs Disease at age 64. Had frequent bladder/kidney infections in my 30's and 40/s, and was having incontinence problems when I was diagnosed (accidentally) at Mayo Clinic. I have been gluten free 18 months, and the incontinence issues are mostly resolved.

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    I've gotten frequent bladder infections for years and though I suspected it might have something to do with what I was eating, I could never quite put my finger on it. I've also had the devastating fatigue, headaches, painful bloating, achy joints, irritability. I've been a vegan, too, for about a year now, and I have to say that cutting out the meat and the dairy have helped some, too. Don't know how hard it will be to be gluten free, as well, but I'll try anything to feel better. Thank you for your article. Stay healthy.

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    Guest phyllis

    Posted

    Thanks so much for your info. I thought this was all in my head. I was diagnosed almost a year ago and had no idea it could cause bladder ailments and also the 'new' rash I have. Many doctors (or mine) do not know all of the symptoms that this disease may cause. Thanks

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    Guest Valerie

    Posted

    After too many years I have struggled with my mother's Colon Cancer and my daughter's Incontinence issues, Now I know that it is a hereditary issue. Thank you for sharing your stories and I hope that we can heal and help others.

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    I gave up gluten because my sweet son was diagnosed with Celiac disease. I have had a LIFE LONG struggle with my bladder and kidneys and recently have been in so much pain I felt like giving up on life!! A few weeks of the diet and I feel AMAZING!! I cannot wait to see how much better I feel in the future!! This word HAS to get out!! My son's diagnosis literally saved my life and I want to become part of the 'cause' to get this word out about gluten!! Please contact me if there is anything I can do!!!

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    This has been so informative. I have celiac, IC, fibromyalgia, sjorgrens.

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    I just want to write on behalf of my mother. She has been struggling for almost 6 years with constant bladder-pain infection, and she went for so many operations, and now she must use a catheter three times a day. she became much better and did cut out the obvious food, except the hidden gluten. They even put her on anti-depressants. Thank you for this article. she cried when she read it. All praise to God. Thank you. She is finally living again, like the mom I always knew.

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    I didn't even imagine that there is a link between gluten intolerance and IC. I can't get a doctor to tell me that my problem is gluten, but after cutting out the obvious culprits for the last week, it is glaringly obvious. Just the fact that I don't look pregnant anymore tells me what I need to know. Now that I see that the two conditions go hand in hand and can be corrected by eliminating gluten from my diet, I'm more convinced that this is the way to be! I agree with the other people that say that they are happy to know that it's not all in their imagination! Thank you.

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    I am 24, and I have had stomach trouble and constipation for the past 10 years. My mom was diagnosed with celiac a few years ago, and I suspected that I might have it as well but didn't want to have to go on the diet so ignored my issues. Over the past year, I have had chronic yeast infections, chronic urniary tract infections, joint pain, problems with anxiety, fatigue, headaches and recently started breaking out in hives and an itchy rash. I am now positive that I have celiac too, and I believe it has caused all of these issues. I am going to go on the gluten-free diet and hope that it resolves the issues I have been having.

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    Guest Isabel

    Posted

    Your article helped me to link a rash I have been getting on my hands and feet for the last 10-12 years of my life to a wheat allergy! I was told it was some weird type of eczema by the doctors and that a steroid cream would make it go away, but I refused the cream, seeming only to suffer badly with it in Summer. But from the pictures and the description I believe it to be dermatitis erpetiformis.

    I too have bladder problems! Which has been a more recent problem, lasting about the last 8 months. I have taken countless courses of unsuccessful antibiotics and tried many different supplements, also seen a specialist and had scans, xrays etc. I gave up sex for a month (as instructed by a urologist) which seemed to help a bit, but not fully. It was only when my sister who is a Coeliac suggested that I give up wheat that I found any success. She had read on group on facebook that some Coeliacs have long standing bladder problems (or IC) instead of any intestinal symptoms. I have been wheat free for just over 2 weeks and feel almost normal, urinating no longer has me crying or panicking for the first time in ages. Keep up the good work, because I believe this could solve an awful lot of problems for many people, who are suffering needlessly with endless pain.

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    Guest Elizabeth L.

    Posted

    I was diagnosed with IC about ten years ago after living with constant pain, dozens of doctors' appointments and ER visits, and countless rounds of antibiotics. Last year I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and have been taking synthroid, in addition to Elmiron for IC. I knew about the link between thyroid issues and gluten intolerance, so when I started to have nausea, sinus headaches and fatigue, I did an elimination diet to see if quitting gluten would help. The result is amazing. I no longer have sinus problems or stomach problems or fatigue. It's only been two months, but already my IC symptoms have improved greatly. It's something I figured out on my own just by paying attention to my body. We need doctors to learn more about this and start talking about the benefits of a gluten-free diet! I feel like I lost gluten, but I got my life back, and that's a pretty good bargain.

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    Guest Wendy Cohan, RN

    Posted

    I was diagnosed with IC about ten years ago after living with constant pain, dozens of doctors' appointments and ER visits, and countless rounds of antibiotics. Last year I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and have been taking synthroid, in addition to Elmiron for IC. I knew about the link between thyroid issues and gluten intolerance, so when I started to have nausea, sinus headaches and fatigue, I did an elimination diet to see if quitting gluten would help. The result is amazing. I no longer have sinus problems or stomach problems or fatigue. It's only been two months, but already my IC symptoms have improved greatly. It's something I figured out on my own just by paying attention to my body. We need doctors to learn more about this and start talking about the benefits of a gluten-free diet! I feel like I lost gluten, but I got my life back, and that's a pretty good bargain.

    Hi Elizabeth,

     

    Well, they are finally beginning to listen. I wrote "The Better Bladder Book - A Holistic Approach to Healing Interstitial Cystitis & Chronic Pelvic Pain" in 2010, and it has an entire chapter on the link between gluten (as well as other food sensitivities) and the bladder. There are also two new studies confirming that at this estimate, about 30-40% of IC patients are gluten-sensitive.

     

    Wendy Cohan, RN - article author

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    Guest Simone

    Posted

    My daughter is 6 and has had UTI's since 3 with horrible emotional consequences and gastro problems. She has had two blood tests coming back negative and now has to wait 4 months to have a biopsy to test for celiac. I so just want to remove Gluten NOW, but have been told not to as it affects the results of the biopsy.

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    Guest Christy

    Posted

    I have had appts. with my family doc, urologists, and recently a naturopathic physician. For the last year the inflammation in my bladder has been pretty extreme at times. I've been diagnosed and re-diagnosed by many - but with no test results to prove anything. And, the tests I've undergone have been MANY. Bringing my naturopathic physician into the picture has been a life saver. He asked me to stop eating wheat in all forms only a month ago. Within 3 days the severity of my bladder problem totally subsided. If you run into my post please try this. I can't believe the different and the insanity of the past year trying so hard to find out what was wrong. Thank you for creating this site.

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    Guest Heather

    Posted

    Thank you so much for this! I saw a stop in my "UTIs" when going on a gluten free diet. I also saw great improvement in my severe IBS, fatigue, and other crazy symptoms (my adult-onset acne cleared completely)! Every time I had an accidental gluten-ing, I would get what felt like a UTI. But the cultures NEVER grew anything out (I was always treated with antibiotics, but after going through my records I realized that I never had anything grow on the cultures). Now that I'm pregnant with my first child, I have had two UTIs. The doctor says they are completely normal and puts me on antibiotics. However, I have nothing growing on the cultures still. This is my third "UTI" in 3 months and I asked him if it could be interstitial cystitis, not an UTI. The doctor is unsure but willing to let me ride out this one without antibiotics because I know that I consumed gluten by accident just four days ago, right before this started! I took this website to him to show him the information contained. Thanks

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    Hi, it is brilliant to find this information. I get urine/bladder infections really easily. I've long thought that a gluten intolerance could be to blame. Recently my gynecologist told me the infections could stem from a problem with the intestines. Along with being very bloated all the time and having sudden tired/irritated spells there are many other little symptoms. My sister has intolerances and my mother has been struggling for years to get some kind of diagnosis for herself, but being of a certain age doctors take her for a complaining menopausal woman. She has cut out gluten completely. I'm hesitant to go to see a specialist. My generalist is pretty useless, combing this with my mother's struggle I am very skeptical that something will come out of it. What should I expect and how should I approach this with a doctor? Thanks in advance for any feedback.

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    Paul Smith
    This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 10/30/2009 - The major concern in producing gluten and allergen-free foods is always that of cross contamination. In my view, the only safe way to produce gluten-free meals and products is in a rigorously controlled and totally gluten-free environment where all ingredients are strictly gluten-free and all benches, utensils and equipment, etc. are dedicated and remain in a totally gluten-free condition at all times. It must always be remembered that gluten-free should mean “ totally and absolutely gluten-free,” and that there should always be an uncompromising zero tolerance for any form of gluten contamination, no matter how slight.
    In my view the same approach should be adopted for anaphylaxis inducing ingredients like peanuts, eggs, sesame seeds, shellfish and crustaceans: that it is best to exclude them entirely to eliminate the risk of accidental contamination. Any other approach requires extremely alert and well informed operators in combination with elaborate cleaning and testing protocols; all of which are prone to mistakes and failure.
    It is my view, that many people are too cavalier in their approach to the matter of gluten contamination, taking the attitude that “a little won’t hurt.” Many manufacturers, particularly restaurants, small bakers and pizza makers etc., for example, are often asked about making gluten-free products and see this as a means of expanding their businesses. Something many of them attempt without properly trained staff and without fully understanding the implications and risks of undertaking such a project. However, there are also many worthy exceptions to this comment: the difficulty is in finding them.
    In flour and bakery situations gluten is always present and is often used as an ingredient. Typical suburban bakeries tend to have flour and hence gluten everywhere. Flour and gluten are insidious and can float in the air for many hours after use and can be dislodged by banging doors and draughts. Benches, tins, trays, dough rollers, dough dividers, bread slicers, utensils, belt ovens etc., are often contaminated with gluten and many of these items are difficult to clean thoroughly. Bakeries are inherently difficult to keep clean and maintain in a gluten-free state.
    Deep fryers are also fraught with difficulty. For example, potato chips which are gluten-free by definition, can easily be contaminated with gluten from the gluten residues left in the deep fryer by cooking such products as crumbed calamari, veal schnitzel, chicken schnitzel, spring rolls, battered fish and the like in the same deep fryer. The only way to produce gluten-free potato chips is by having and maintaining an exclusively gluten-free deep fryer where only gluten-free batters and crumbs etc., are used. Extreme care must also be taken with bench surfaces and all utensils, aprons, towels etc., used and in washing hands.
    Other contentious areas are colorings, flavorings, salad dressings, thickeners, gravies, sauces, for both savory and dessert applications, as these often introduce gluten contamination to otherwise gluten-free meals and foods. If already applied to a meal these can never be fully removed by attempting to scrape them off. The meal should always be totally replaced with a sauce or whatever free meal or course.
    In my view, the consumer’s safety and well being should always be paramount: the consumer should not be imposed upon and they should be given an informed choice as to what they consume at any time. This is the basis upon which we run our business. Avoidance of all the above problems requires well trained and aware staff working under well informed and aware management in a clean and well controlled environment.

    Paul Smith
    Celiac.com 12/23/2009 - One of the main and largely unrecognized health problems facing the Western world and people on diets of highly refined, processed and starchy foods, which are often low in or devoid of dietary fiber, is that of constipation. This is a particular issue with Celiacs where the gluten-free flours they use are largely starch based and often low in protein and dietary fiber. Unfortunately, we live in a world where it is often considered normal and acceptable to empty the bowels perhaps 2 -3 times a week, rather than the more desirable 2 – 3 times per day.
    What are the difficulties in this you may ask?
    Firstly the lymphatic system drains through the bowels and if the bowels are clogged and constipated the lymph system, which is a major part of the human body’s excretory system, does not function properly.  This means that instead of continuously draining, as it should, the lymph system becomes a long term storage system for the body’s waste matter when confronted with a constipated digestive system, which provides a home and breeding ground for bacteria and perhaps becoming a precursor for infection and many chronic health problems including cancer. Constipation also leads to dry and hard stools which are difficult to pass and may contribute to the development of hemorrhoids or “piles”, as they are commonly known, and possibly longer term issues leading to colon and rectal cancers. Constipation also leads to greatly increased and undesirable residence time for waste matter in the body which solidifies and putrifies in the process possibly contributing to various forms of gastric and bowel cancer.

    Other parts of the body’s excretory systems including the sinuses; the lungs and the skin, the body’s largest excretory organ, can also become overloaded if the bowels and lymph system are not functioning correctly. Sinus overload can be reflected in having heavy mucus discharge via a cold or the flu, glandular fever and in nasal, eye and ear infections, from infected, stored mucus. Lung overload may be reflected by mucus discharges associated with a cold or influenza, pleurisy, pneumonia and various other forms of mucus containing fluid which may also become infected by hostile germs and bacteria. Skin overload can be reflected in rashes, eczema, psoriasis, measles, hives, shingles, chicken pox and the like: all symptoms of an acidic body condition and an overloaded elimination or excretory system. If the body cannot dispose of its waste matter by other means, it often resorts to throwing the waste matter out through the skin. Chronic fatigue syndrome is possibly another manifestation of this same issue.

    Sadly, the vast majority of the human race, end their lives with all of their excretory organs, lungs and blood circulatory systems overloaded with stored waste matter with significantly shortened life expectancy and diminished quality of life as a result.

    None of the latter problems have anything to do with or need to be part of the aging process. For example, I have a very spry, mentally alert 90 year old father, A blood group type, who still works on a daily basis, drives a car, is totally medication free, has no prostrate, heart or cancer problems and has a good head of hair; clear skin, eyes, arteries and lungs. He should be the model of normality. Sadly, he is not typical. How and why? A fairly spartan diet based mainly upon fruit and vegetables with very sparing consumption of meat, dairy products, fried foods, salt, sugar, animal fats, cakes, lollies, convenience foods and alcohol. He has never smoked. He drinks mainly water and fresh juice with fresh citrus juice first thing every morning. He eats slowly and chews his food thoroughly. He never overeats. He remains curious, physically active and engaged with the world. My paternal grandmother, Daisy, was still walking around without the aid of a stick at age 106 – 107 with all her faculties and complaining about all the other “old chooks” in the nursing home on their walking frames etc: many of them 40 years her junior. Adequate sleep and minimizing stress is also critical to maintaining good health.

    Most of the chronic health problems facing our community are mainly unnecessary consequences of over indulgence and the accumulations of a lifetime’s bad habits and, in most instances, with a little care these habits are largely avoidable. Fevers and colds are natural processes. They are part of the body’s armoury of natural defense mechanisms for dealing with a cleansing crisis. All too often these and other natural processes are medically suppressed rather than being allowed to run their natural course. They are one of the body’s ways of saying it is overloaded with waste matter and that it needs a chance to deal with this problem. Antibiotics, taken orally, also tend to indiscriminately kill both good and bad gut bacteria often inadvertently disrupting the long term performance of the digestive system to the long term detriment of the patient’s health especially when no restorative probiotics are prescribed as part of the process: which is mainly the case.

    How do we avoid these problems? By a host of small, simple and easily implemented strategies over a lifetime: by a little self discipline and the formulation of good eating and nutritional habits which enable our bodies to function effectively, naturally, healthily and sustainably for a lifetime, as they are intended to. Ill health is not our natural state but one we impose upon ourselves, or otherwise, through our dietary and lifestyle choices, both individually and collectively.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/20/2012 - Candi Smithson says her 2-year-old son, Preston, has severe allergies that present him from eating certain breads and dairy items, among other things. Celiac disease prevents Preston from eating anything containing gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.
    Preston also is allergic to certain milk proteins, making things like butter and other dairy products hazardous to his health.
    Smithson claims that the local pizza Hut in Muskogee, Oklahoma discriminated against her by asking her and her son to leave the restaurant. Smithson told reporters that she was in Muskogee as part of a home-schooling group to see replicas of the Niña and Pinta ships, which had been cruising the Arkansas River in recent weeks. Smithson, another parent and four children, including Preston, stopped at Pizza Hut to have lunch.
    Smithson told reporters from NewsOk.com that, before going into Pizza Hut, she had first stopped at McDonald's to get Preston a hamburger without the bun, and some french fries, which is safe for Preston to eat.
    She brought that food with her into Pizza Hut, where she planned to order pizza for the other kids. But before the group could place an order, Smithson said a waitress told her that she could not be in the store with the McDonald's items.
    Smithson told reporters that she explained the situation, but that the waitress remained unmoved.
    “I explained why I was bringing in the food, but she said it didn't matter,” Smithson said. Smithson then asked to speak to the manager. She says that the manager, who was reportedly unavailable for comment, was also unsympathetic to the situation.
    According to Smithson, the manager basically said, "We can't have this food in here, so we're going to have to ask you to leave,'” Smithson said. “I was really shocked ... we bring food into restaurants all the time, and this has never happened before.”
    Smithson told reporters that Pizza Hut had no signs indicating a no-outside-food policy, and added that the restaurant lost out on five paying customers by demanding the hamburger and fries be discarded.
    Indeed, a Pizza Hut official, who spoke to reporters on the condition he remain unnamed, says he knows of no company policies that would prevent paying customers from eating outside food in a Pizza Hut restaurant.
    According to reporters, calls to Pizza Hut's corporate offices seeking comment on this story went unreturned.
    Smithson says the actions of the Pizza Hut manager violated her son's rights as a person living with a disability. She claims food allergies that interfere with “major life activities” are considered disabilities.
    Marca Bristo, who helped craft the original Americans with Disabilities Act during the late 1980s, agrees with Smithson. Bristo served as chairman of the National Council on Disability, a position she was appointed to by former President Bill Clinton.
    Bristo said the Americans with Disabilities Act, enacted in 1990, was amended in 2008 to broaden what are considered “major life activities.” She said the changes were necessary because “the courts had narrowed the definition of the law” up to that point.
    Eating is listed as major life activity in the amended act, which went into effect Jan. 1, 2009.
    When asked about Candi Smithson's ordeal, Birsto said, “I do think she is right to challenge this." There are some ambiguities in the law, but, basically, Bristo says, "…if a food allergy affects life activities, it's got to be considered a disability and should fall under the act.”
    Still, Smithson insists she's not looking for money. “I just want the policies changed,” she told reporters. “That way, when he gets older, he won't have to deal with things like this.”
    Has anything like this happened to you or anyone you know?  Should restaurants be flexible when paying customers need to bring in outside food for reasons concerning allergies or food sensitivities? Let us know your thoughts.
    The story was originally reported by NewsOk.com.
    Source:

    http://newsok.com/oklahoma-mother-says-muskogee-pizza-hut-discriminated-against-son/article/3627995

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/12/2014 - Here are five things people with celiac disease need regular folks to know about celiac disease:
    We are NOT on a Fad Diet—Celiac disease is not some vague, make-believe condition. Celiac disease is a potentially serious immune disorder that, if left untreated, can lead to a very deadly types of stomach, intestinal, and other cancers. Just because a bunch of people seem to think that gluten is the new high fructose corn syrup, doesn’t mean that I’m one of them. Remember, for people with celiac disease, gluten is no joke, and avoiding gluten is the only way to stay healthy. We Won’t Be Getting Over It—Currently, there is no cure for celiac disease, and the only treatment is a gluten-free diet. That’s the only way to avoid the gut damage, lower risks for other types of auto-immune conditions, and minimize the risk of various types of cancer associated with celiac disease. Celiac Disease is a Serious Condition—Since the effects of untreated celiac disease unfold slowly over time, it’s tempting for some people to look at celiac disease as a minor inconvenience. However, it’s important to understand that celiac disease is a potentially serious autoimmune disorder that, if left untreated, can leave people susceptible to other autoimmune conditions, and to deadly types of stomach, intestinal, and other cancers.  A ‘Little Gluten’ Might Hurt Me—There’s no such thing as ‘a little gluten’ to people with celiac disease. Gut damage happens with as little as 20 parts of gluten per million. That is a microscopic amount. A 'gluten-free' diet means no gluten. Period. When in Doubt, Ask—If you’re not sure if I can safely eat a certain ingredient, or a certain food, just ask. Figuring out what is or is not gluten-free can be tricky, even for me. So, it's best to ask if you're not positive. Can you think of others?
     

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 06/15/2018 - There seems to be widespread agreement in the published medical research reports that stuttering is driven by abnormalities in the brain. Sometimes these are the result of brain injuries resulting from a stroke. Other types of brain injuries can also result in stuttering. Patients with Parkinson’s disease who were treated with stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, an area of the brain that regulates some motor functions, experienced a return or worsening of stuttering that improved when the stimulation was turned off (1). Similarly, stroke has also been reported in association with acquired stuttering (2). While there are some reports of psychological mechanisms underlying stuttering, a majority of reports seem to favor altered brain morphology and/or function as the root of stuttering (3). Reports of structural differences between the brain hemispheres that are absent in those who do not stutter are also common (4). About 5% of children stutter, beginning sometime around age 3, during the phase of speech acquisition. However, about 75% of these cases resolve without intervention, before reaching their teens (5). Some cases of aphasia, a loss of speech production or understanding, have been reported in association with damage or changes to one or more of the language centers of the brain (6). Stuttering may sometimes arise from changes or damage to these same language centers (7). Thus, many stutterers have abnormalities in the same regions of the brain similar to those seen in aphasia.
    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023