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    Great News for Gluten-free Gin, Whiskey and Vodka Lovers


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/20/2015 - Most all gins and whiskeys, and many vodkas, are distilled from grain. While many people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance can drink them with no adverse effects, many others cannot.


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    Photo: CC--Steve CoreyThese brands of gin, whiskey and vodka are made with gluten-free ingredients, and safe for people with celiac disease and wheat sensitivity.

    So anyone with celiac disease who has been missing their gin or whiskey can now happily indulge. Cheers!

    GLUTEN-FREE GIN

    • Cold River Gin is distilled from potatoes. The company’s website says that, like their world-famous vodkas, their gluten-free gin is made with whole Maine potatoes and the pure water of Maine's Cold River.
    • Cold River uses a recipe that “dates back to the early days of British gin,” and contains their own “secret blend of seven traditional botanicals that are steeped for the perfect amount of time to infuse the essential flavors.”

    GLUTEN-FREE WHISKEY

    • Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghumThe idea of a whiskey made from gluten-free grains is sure to excite anyone with celiac disease who longs for a wee dram.
    • The company’s web page says that Queen Jennie is made with 100% Wisconsin Sorghum, and is “Less sour than a bourbon and less harsh than a rye.”

    GLUTEN-FREE VODKA

    • Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito’s, UV
    • Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson’s, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac
    • Monopolowa is one of my favorites, and is usually available at Trader Joe’s.
    • Cold River gluten-free vodka is triple-distilled in a copper pot still, from Maine potatoes and water from Maine's Cold River.
    • Tito’s award winning vodka is six times distilled from corn in an old-fashioned pot still, just like fine single malt scotches and high-end French cognacs. Tito’s is certified Gluten-free.
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    Guest Amanda Martin

    Posted

    You need to try Maui Ocean Vodka...it's gluten free and organic. It's made in Maui, Hawaii.

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    Caprock Gin out of Colorado is made from Apples and is certified Organic. It's a little too strong of botanical tastes for me (I used to love Saphire for G&Ts). In the UK there is William Chase Gin which is made from Apples as well and it's amazing.

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    Guest John Bart

    Posted

    It's fine that these brands are available to those who want to buy them, but there is no brand of distilled spirit of any kind that has anything other that the most minute amount of gluten in it. To say otherwise is to suppose that the vapor generated during distillation contains significant amounts of proteins. That's pure voodoo.

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    Guest john j acres

    Posted

    Gin and vodka have always been gluten free. Gin is made from juniper berries and vodka from potatoes . However it is good news about the Scotch--the bad news is it would be far too expensive to buy in Australia.

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    Guest Ken Ericson

    Posted

    Another very good gluten-free vodka is Blue Ice, made in the USA from russet potatoes. It is available at CVS pharmacies among other places.

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    Guest Jefferson

    Posted

    Gin and vodka have always been gluten free. Gin is made from juniper berries and vodka from potatoes . However it is good news about the Scotch--the bad news is it would be far too expensive to buy in Australia.

    Gin is not traditionally distilled from juniper berries. It is traditionally flavored with juniper berries. Distilled gin is made from any neutral spirit of agricultural origin, which often includes barley and other grains, then flavored with botanicals.

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    Guest Jefferson

    Posted

    It's fine that these brands are available to those who want to buy them, but there is no brand of distilled spirit of any kind that has anything other that the most minute amount of gluten in it. To say otherwise is to suppose that the vapor generated during distillation contains significant amounts of proteins. That's pure voodoo.

    You are correct that all distilled alcoholic beverages are free of gluten unless it is added after distillation. However, some folks feel better knowing that there is no gluten anywhere in the production process, and that the products are labeled as "gluten-free."

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    Guest R SOSINSKI

    Posted

    I read that all distilled spirits are considered gluten-free.

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    Guest John Bart

    Posted

    @R.Sosinski. You are correct. All distilled spirits are gluten-free. That is a fact that is simply beyond dispute. What, if you buy some kind of rum or vodka that has been altered with some flavoring agent, there is at least the theoretical possibility that the manufacturer cluelessly introduced some kind of gluten-containing ingredient. Other than that, if you drank it and got sick, that's what's known as a hangover. I do take gluten-free foods seriously, have had 3-4 years when I was extremely gluten-sensitive (NOT self-diagnosed, by the way) with symptoms I'll politely not describe here. I just wish that spirits producers did not put "Gluten Free" on their labels. It's exploitative. They are playing those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity for suckers, and you are utterly gullible if you take their "we're the safe choice" schtick seriously.

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    @R.Sosinski. You are correct. All distilled spirits are gluten-free. That is a fact that is simply beyond dispute. What, if you buy some kind of rum or vodka that has been altered with some flavoring agent, there is at least the theoretical possibility that the manufacturer cluelessly introduced some kind of gluten-containing ingredient. Other than that, if you drank it and got sick, that's what's known as a hangover. I do take gluten-free foods seriously, have had 3-4 years when I was extremely gluten-sensitive (NOT self-diagnosed, by the way) with symptoms I'll politely not describe here. I just wish that spirits producers did not put "Gluten Free" on their labels. It's exploitative. They are playing those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity for suckers, and you are utterly gullible if you take their "we're the safe choice" schtick seriously.

    saying all distilled spirits are gluten free is like saying all medicine is gluten free. I , myself do not think that my reaction to drinking the spirit was a hang over. Many spirits have added ingredients added after the distilling process including the addition of extra wheat, barley, or malt, hence the double malt process of some whiskeys. As I have been an avid consumer of distilled spirits for 30+ years, and diagnosed celiac sprue for 10 years. As always read labels , watch for cross contamination, the labeling is not for suckers its to help determine whether there is gluten containing ingredients during the making & bottling process , and in that aspect the glue that holds the labeling on to the bottle contains gluten. this is life for me not a fad diet what irritates me is the government saying gluten free is 20 ppm or less. I happen to react to less than 5 ppm.

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    Guest Chris

    Posted

    Excellent article. Now I'm off to enjoy my Moscow Mule!

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    "... what irritates me is the government saying gluten free is 20 ppm or less."

     

    Yes; they should differentiate between gluten free and low in gluten.

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    Guest Tanya

    Posted

    These lists are so helpful for those of us that are allergic to grains (not gluten specifically). Vodka made from potatoes was pretty easy to find, but my local liquor store found Cold River gin for me after I had no luck. There is also a local gin called "St Augustine" which is made from sugar cane, but it's very strong in aromatics, too flowery for my taste. Cold River is very nice, even if I have to special order it.

    I've heard that Trader Joe's has a self-branded potato-based gin too, if you happen to live in a state where liquor is sold in grocery stores.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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