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    Hepatitis B Vaccine Fails in Half of all Celiac Patients: Is it Time to Re-evaluate Current Immunization Strategies?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/21/2009 - Failure of the hepatitis B vaccine in people with celiac disease is common. In fact, vaccine failure occurs in about 50% of all attempts to vaccinate people with celiac disease against hepatitis B. Research shows that age at celiac diagnosis and other factors can influence response rates.


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    The August 12 issue of the medical journal Vaccine features a timely article on failure of the hepatitis B vaccine in people with celiac disease, which asks the very sensible question of whether it is time to reevaluate our current vaccine procedures.

    One of the most important signs of non-responsiveness to the hepatitis B vaccine is a genetic marker called human leukocyte antigen (HLA) phenotype DQ2. It's interesting that people with celiac disease often carry these same genetic markers, and that fact is at the center of one hypothesis about why celiac patients are less able to respond to the hepatitis B vaccine.

    A team of researchers recently set out to assess responsiveness rates to the hepatitis B vaccine among patients with celiac disease. The team was made up of S. Leonardi, M. Spina, L. Spicuzza, N. Rotolo, and M. La Rosa of the Broncho-Pneumology & Cystic Fibrosis Unit of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Catania, in Catania, Italy.

    The team describes the results of a retrospective study on celiac patients vaccinated with three intramuscular injections of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix B) in doses of 10mug at 3, 5 and 11 months of age.

    Their results showed that half of the celiac disease patients (50%) failed to respond to the vaccine course, and that those who did best were less than 18 months of age at the time of diagnosis for celiac disease; that group showed a significantly higher response rate to the vaccine.

    The study confirms that celiac patients have a far higher failure rate for hepatitis B vaccination than healthy control subjects. These results strengthen the call to re-evaluate current hepatitis B vaccine strategies for patients with celiac disease and to assess whether to recommend a course of re-vaccination.

    Source: Vaccine - August 12, 2009.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Rick Lenger
    Celiac.com 10/12/2009 - It has been 9 months since my celiac diagnosis. It seems hard for me to believe that until January 23, 2009 I had never even heard of celiac disease. I have made up for lost time in the past few months. Hopefully, my story will help others who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease to hang on to hope and be encouraged that things are going to get better – much better as they move into a gluten free lifestyle. 
    In 1971 I had a panic attack. I have never been the same since that day. I won’t go into the details of it because most people know what a panic attack is like.  So I had a complete physical which included blood panels for the first time. When I got the results I found out I had an extremely elevated alkaline phosphatase level (400), normal is 80-130. My first thought was, “What the heck is alkaline phosphatase?”  The doctor was alarmed.  He ran more tests and suggested a liver biopsy.  He thought I might have liver cancer. No liver disease was found. From that panic attack until my celiac diagnosis I was always anxious about my liver. I also fought the fear of more panic attacks.   Nothing was ever conclusive. It just hung out there for over 35 years.  Every time I changed doctors and had my blood tested I went through the same series of tests and concerns. Nothing definitive was ever diagnosed.  Finally, my doctor told me my elevated counts were “normal for me.”
    Fast forward to the year 2003.  Without any reason I lost 20 lbs. over an 8 week period. I thought it was kind of cool to be “skinny”. I had always being kind of “doughy.” When I had a physical I found my alk-phos was now over 400.  I was anemic and more fatigued than ever.  My doctor wanted me to have a colonoscopy and an endoscopy. He said he was more worried about the anemia than the high alkaline phosphate. I had a colonoscopy, but refused the endoscopy on grounds that I couldn’t bear the thought of having a tube put down my esophagus.  What a mistake!  I could have gotten this diagnosis 6 years earlier.  The colonoscopy revealed no disease. When I did finally have an endoscopy in 2009 I was totally sedated and the test took about 4 minutes. It was the easiest test I’ve ever had.  My doctor thought I was depressed and put me on anti-depressants.  After adjusting to the meds I think I felt a little better, but deep down I knew something major was going on.  I figured if I were the President I would be sent to the Mayo Clinic for a couple of weeks and they would find out what was plaguing me. I thought my problem could be found only by the best doctors in the world and it would be at great expense – more than I could afford, so I decided to just live the best I could.
    Before my diagnosis I was not absorbing many, if any, nutrients.  At 6’2” I was a gaunt 156 lbs.  I had rapid heart beat, shortness of breath, fatigue, anemia, terrible muscle cramps all the intestinal issues known to man. Numerous blood counts were way off. The 98 lb. weakling at the beach could have kicked sand in my face all day long. My wife told me she couldn’t look at me anymore. It’s hard to look at someone who is suffering from serious malnutrition.  Everything I ate went right through me.  I didn’t think about it at the time, but as I reflect back on it I know I would have died by now if I hadn’t gotten off the gluten. Now I can see signs of celiac since childhood. I was delayed in reaching puberty until I was a junior in high school. I also had fears that we not reasonable.  There were some things going on neurologically for sure.

    I began feeling better within a few days after being diagnosed and going gluten free last January.  My weight began going up, and I just knew the anemia would go away and so would the high alk-phos.  6 weeks after diagnosis (March 2009) I went in for a blood test.  I was convinced the bloodwork would show normal levels in every category. I was proud and giddy.  I couldn’t wait to get the results.  Surprise, surprise!  The blood count for anemia had not changed and the alkaline phosphatase was over 600! What the heck was going on!  At least I felt better.
    I stumbled across a couple of articles on the internet about high alkaline phosphatase in celiacs and possible reasons.  Many celiacs have low calcium and vitamin D, and in some cases it causes high alk-phos.  Without getting too technical it seems that the alk-phos plays a role in bone growth and can go into overdrive when calcium and Vitamin D are extremely low. The solution for us may be in taking lots of calcium and Vitamin D supplements.  I know this is controversial, but I decided to go directly to the source of vitamin D (the Sun) for 15 minutes of sunlight each day.  I also have been taking a great gluten free calcium/magnesium supplement for the past 6 months.  Last week I went in for more bloodwork.  I know I continue to feel better all of the time, but after my last blood work I’m a little nervous about the actual results.  The nurse called me the day after the blood was drawn and told me my count for anemia is now in the low normal range and the alkaline phosphatase is 300!  It had dropped 300 points in 6 months.  I think I’m on to something.  I feel like I’m on the right track and will continue the supplements. I haven’t mentioned how low my cholesterol was in January.  The LDL was 33 and the HDL was 18.  The total cholesterol was 61. The doctor said it was the lowest cholesterol he had ever seen! Now it has gone up to a total of 140!  Something is definitely working!  I think just being gluten free for 9 months has been better than anything else, but I continue to be hopeful about the calcium and vitamin D supplements.
     I have gained 50 healthy lbs. since discovering I’m a full blown, card carrying celiac. I’m working out every other day with weights and I figure of the 50 extra lbs. about 25 of it is muscle and the rest is fat.  Oh well.  I do look better.  My wife can look at me again and I can even look at myself once in a while. I had no idea what it was like to feel normal.  Good things can be found through every struggle. Were it not for these trials I would not have found my faith and learned to trust God. I wouldn’t change that for anything. Everything happens for a reason. I do wonder what I may have done with my life had I been gluten free from birth.  I don’t spend too much time thinking about it, though, since I can do nothing to change it. I consider it miraculous that I could have been in education as a teacher and administrator for 32 years before I hit the wall in 2005.   I’m 60 years old now.  I really look forward to the future. I feel like my best years are ahead of me.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/16/2011 - The market for gluten-free cosmetics and personal care products seemsto be enjoying some of the same rapid growth seen over the last severalyears by the gluten-free food industry.

    As a result, many companies are moving to create new, gluten-freeproducts and formulations for consumers who suffer from celiac diseaseor gluten intolerance.

    From 2007 to 2009,  gluten-free cosmetics and personal care market sawthe launch of seventeen new gluten-free cosmetics and personal careproducts, while the number of gluten-free lip products rose from one to10, according to Mintel.

    Gluten-free, Vegan, vegetarian and cruelty-free are all making strong headway in the personal and beauty care industry.

    In 2007, a company called Symrise introduced a gluten-free alternativeto common wheat- and milk soy-derived proteins. Symrise's two,gluten-free, plant-based moisturizing ingredients, Hydromoist L andHydromoist O, are derived from lupine and oats, respectively. They makemake a suitable ingredient in certain shampoos.

    In 2009, color cosmetics and personal care manufacturer Logona NaturalCosmetics launched an all gluten-free line featuring 155 products.

    Natural skincare product creator Natural Bodycare has introduced a lineof more than 90 formulas is now 100-percent vegan and mostlygluten-free, with the exception of two products that contain Avenasativa (oat) kernel extract, which may have traces of gluten.

    From cosmetics to body and skin care products and ingredients, themarket for gluten-free personal care products is rapidly expanding.Because of this expansion, people with celiac disease and glutenintolerance can now enjoy personal body care products that just a fewyears ago would have been unavailable. It looks like more gluten-freepersonal care companies, products and developments are just around thecorner.
    Source:

    Mintel

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/02/2013 - There really hasn't been too much research into gluten levels of products labeled and sold as 'gluten-free in the U.S. A team of researchers recently set out to try to get an idea of gluten levels in food being labeled and sold as 'gluten-free.'
    The good news is that that vast majority of gluten-free foods sampled in their small study were, in fact, gluten-free, and many registered detectable gluten levels far below the 20 ppm allowed by law.
    The research team tested three different samples of 112 separate products, for a total of 336 packages tested. They tested each sample twice, for a total of 672 extractions.
    Of the 112 products tested, 36 products (32%) were certified gluten-free by either the Gluten Free Certification Organization (32 products) or the Celiac Sprue Association (4 products). Only four products (i.e., bread, hot cereal, tortilla, cookie) from three manufacturers tested at or above 20 ppm gluten. Three of these products were not certified gluten-free; one product was certified gluten-free.
    While 9.4% of extractions contained quantifiable gluten, the vast majority of manufacturers are in compliance with the Food and Drug Administration’s gluten-free labeling rule.
    Overall, 97.5 percent of extractions tested below 20 ppm gluten. Of the extractions in compliance, 93% tested below 5 ppm gluten, which is the lower limit of quantification for the assay used.
    Based on the findings of this evaluation, many manufacturers are currently producing food that tests below the 20ppm threshold level of gluten that is currently allowed by the FDA.
    Gluten-free consumers can take comfort in the knowledge that the vast majority of manufacturers who are designating food as gluten-free are complying with the FDA’s labeling rule.
    Source:
    www.medicine.virginia.edu

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
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    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
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    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
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    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au