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    How Celiacs can Deal with Accidental Gluten Ingestion


    Kristen Campbell

    Celiac.com 01/03/2009 - Recently on a gluten-free forum, I found a post asking for advice on what to do after a woman had accidentally consumed a large amount of gluten.  After unknowingly eating from her daughter’s takeout box, the woman had realized her mistake and was simply devastated to have broken her diet and subjected herself to the old, too-familiar symptoms that were on their way.


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    It was interesting reading the various responses, which resulted in a debate over whether or not to induce vomiting, drink pineapple juice, take enzymes or engage in a certain illegal activity.  In all the debate, the woman eventually disappeared off the forum, which probably meant that she took some action or another, though I never heard the final result.

    This whole subject inspired some research on my part.  I first consulted my extensive gluten-free library, which led me to one solitary, repetitive answer: do not eat gluten.  In a world where doctors and authors alike are so concerned that their advice on the subject will lead people with gluten sensitivities to forgo a gluten-free diet in favor of a “band aid” of sorts, that finding a documented recommendation is near impossible.

    These experts are right to reinforce the importance of maintaining a gluten free lifestyle, and the fact that there is no “cure” for gluten intolerance and celiac disease (other than complete avoidance of gluten from wheat, barley and rye).  But mistakes do happen, and from time to time people do get "glutened,” and when they do, which action is best?

    No matter what the size is of the offending dose of gluten, all experts agree, inducing vomiting is too dangerous and disruptive to the body to be considered.  But there is one option that at least two noted experts in field of celiac research agree upon: enzymes.

    When I contacted the renowned Dr. Kenneth Fine of EnteroLab, and asked him if perhaps a dose of enzymes that are designed to break down gluten might help, he had this to say: “The good news is that everyone will survive and recover from the gluten exposure.  The enzymes you mention might help, but not completely, unless they consumed at the same time (as the gluten) for best results.”  And like all good doctors, he did go on to warn, “Avoidance is still the best policy.”

    Shari Lieberman, PhD, CNS, FACN and author of The Gluten Connection very humbly admits that “gluten slips happen.”  She also devotes a couple of pages in her book to research conducted using digestive enzymes to help manage those occasions when gluten does make its way into your diet, citing a research example in which “The study demonstrates that enzyme therapy can substantially minimize symptoms in people with celiac disease who are exposed to gluten.” 

    The enzyme used in this study does not seem to be currently available, but other gluten enzymes are at your local health food store.  I contacted one company in regard to their product, which according to them helps to reduce inflammation caused by the introduction of gluten in an individual with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.  According to them their enzymes will not prevent all damage, but may reduce some inflammation and help the body to better digest the protein.

    Ultimately, gluten sensitive individuals should recover from one accidental “gluten slip” here and there, and keeping some digestive enzymes handy to help cope with such an accident is not a bad idea.  But do keep in mind that repeated offenses, even the most minute, will damage your body and prevent it from healing.  Enzymes help treat the symptoms, but only complete avoidance of gluten can treat the disease.


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    Great article, I am glad to see someone unafraid to touch on this subject. Too many authors are so afraid that we'll all go start eating gluten that they won't even touch it.

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    A very good article! Although general awareness of Gluten Free and Celiac is increasing, there are still too many times I have been the unwitting recipient of gluten at restaurants (sauce ingredients, dressings, etc). The dreaded symptoms normally show up after about an hour or so, and last a day or more...I would love to cut the side effects short, and feel like myself earlier!

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    Believe it or not, I have found that one shot of tequila within a few hours of ingesting gluten greatly minimizes my symptoms, almost to the point of negating any reaction! Just one shot, though!

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    Guest Jennifer

    Posted

    Hi,

    I just had an accidental slip-up about an hour ago. I am on vacation and ate from the double-dipped peanut butter jar instead of the one intended for me...

    Anyway, when I slip up, I immediately take a dose of a product called Glutagenics by Metagenics. (I'm not at home so can't get any more specific than that for now). It aids in restoring the intestinal lining.

    You mentioned enzymes, do you have a name brand? A lot of enzymes actually contain gluten, so I don't want to try anything without getting a name brand recommendation. Thanks for the article!

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    Guest Darci Frankel, Kauai, Hawaii

    Posted

    I found the article very informative, and I am so happy that there is more and more information about gluten intolerance in the world. I disagree with the bit about inducing vomiting being so gravely dangerous. When cats need to expel excess mucous from their stomachs, they instinctively eat a certain type of grass that makes them vomit. I don't have full blown celiac but I do get pain when I eat gluten, and the one time I ate a muffin that was assured to me to be gluten free, (well I only took a few bites) I realized that I didn't want to go through several days of discomfort, so I drank some water and stuck my finger down my throat and eliminated the few bites. Now I'm not advising that everyone eat whatever you want and then be bulimic, that is dangerous but I am saying we shouldn't be afraid of our bodies and its natural reflexive actions. Enjoy life and be well. Aloha!

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    This has been an ongoing question for us. Thanks for the research.

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    Guest No Gluten

    Posted

    What a great article - a wonderful resource for those who may accidentally ingest gluten. Bravo!

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    Great topic! In my own personal experience, it is best to cleanse the small intestine of the mucosal inflammation. I use apple cider vinegar for this. Dilute a tablespoon or two in water and drink. Do this a few times per day. I find the greasy and/or loose stools disappear within a day or so.

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    Guest michele

    Posted

    My son was diagnosed with celiac when he was 13. He is now 18 and has always stuck to his gluten free diet. However, today he accidentally ate gluten. Not just a small amount, but a very very large amount. An entire half of a 16' pizza! That was at 6:30 pm. He threw up at 8:30 pm then 9:30pm then 10:20 and now again at 10:54.

    I have been searching the internet for hours (while caring for him) trying to find out how serious it is to be glutened this badly.

    Thanks

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    Wow, the tequila shot is one which I've never heard before, does it help you minimize your symptoms? I was wondering what the name of these enzymes are as I never purposely ingest gluten, but it would be nice to be able to minimize

    the gut inflammation, even slightly after an attack.

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    Guest Heather

    Posted

    In the weeks before I was diagnosed, the ONLY thing that would ease my mysterious stomach pain/nausea/heartburn was Celestial Seasoning's Tummy Mint Tea. I know I might sound like a corporate plant here, but it's a completely benign thing to at least give a try. Even though I'm now on a gluten free diet, it seems my stomach upsets easily, and it is almost always effective. I'm sure other brands of tea with similar ingredients would work as well.

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    Guest Sharon Milan

    Posted

    I ate 2 bites of a flour tortilla by accident. When I get gluten accidentally I usually lay in bed for three days with flew like symptoms, inflammation an achy body and no energy. I took Claritin 1 hour after. It seems to be helping, but I'm afraid to stop taking it because I am bloated and it seems to be helping the pain. I'm glad you had other suggestions.

    Sharon

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    Guest Ethan

    Posted

    Taking Pepto Bismal can help - because it reduces the inflammation.

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    Ginger helps for the upset stomach as a result of accidental ingestion. I prefer the ginger snaps better than the crystallized but I always have crystallized ginger on hand just in case---though I avoid gluten like the plague accidents do happen. There are also ginger teas that can be mixed with peppermint to calm the stomach as well.

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    Guest Lauren

    Posted

    I just wanted to say thanks so much for writing and posting this article! I just ate a muffin (that I was told was gluten-free but found out after I had eaten half of it that that it wasn't) and wasn't sure how I should go about minimizing the painful side effects that will inevitably come with ingesting gluten. I searched the internet the topic and came across this article and as a result of reading I have gone out and bought strong digestive enzymes from a naturopath. Its been about 3 hours since I ate the muffin and so far, so good. I only have minor symptoms that are, although quite uncomfortable, not what I would usually experience.

     

    So, thanks again for posting this article, it has helped me a lot!

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    Thank you - would like brand names for enzymes.

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    I would second the apple cider vinegar tonic and the ginger tea. You can make your own: grate 1 tablespoon of ginger root into hot water and add honey to taste. Probiotics will also help with the leaky gut afterward. Good luck!

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    Guest Jay Menna

    Posted

    I appreciate this article. Like many other Celiac patients I occasionally am exposed to gluten. Enzyme therapy works for me as well as a dose of Asacol. I suggest that others consider this approach. Thanks. Jay

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    Guest Wendy Reavis

    Posted

    I ate at a buffet and knew I was probably going to get sick. Its been 3 years of gluten free eating. My skin itches, the inside of my mouth taste like biting on tinfoil and I'm swollen! I drank peppermint tea, ate an enzyme, drank apple cider vinegar, & drank a shot of tequila! I'm praying I don't suffer any more soon!Thanks for all the info.

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    Slippery Elm powder along with Marshmallow Root are really helpful when the accidental gluten is ingested.

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    Guest Jenny

    Posted

    Great article but I have none of those things in the house and I am so sick. Hate eating out now such a bother, waiter promised everything was gluten free and I asked him again when he brought the gorgeous meal...What do you have to do....

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    Guest Caroline

    Posted

    Thank you so much for this article! I accidentally ate something with a small amount of wheat-gluten tonight (after being reassured that what I was eating was safe) and while I don't have my usual strong reactions (thank God!), I do feel slightly sick. The one thing this experience has taught is my body still reacts to gluten/wheat in the same ways it used to, and even some ways I wasn't aware of (I've been gluten-free due to Celiac Disease for maybe 2-3 years now, but rare slip-ups have happened).

     

    I really appreciate your thoughts on how to care for yourself once this experience happens--I was so nervous at the first sign of my migraine and stomach ache!

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    It's easy to say that vomiting is a bad idea but I'd much rather throw up than suffer through 1-3 days of misery. I accidentally took a big bite of the wrong soup today when I was making lunch for myself and my kids and I immediately threw it up and followed up with a big does of digestive enzymes just in case I didn't get it all. Throwing up on purpose a few times a year after accidentally ingesting gluten can't possibly be a huge health risk.

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    Benadryl has helped me on occasion.

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    Guest Gfree Dallas

    Posted

    I took enzymes, chewable Benadryl, Motrin, Maalox, and I drank two water bottles. Felt burpy, but not sick....and I am celiac, not just gluten intolerant. Had been gluten free for two years when glutened on accident (half a hot dog that was supposed to be gluten free but was Mrs. Baird's... From the gluten free stand at a major league ballpark).

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    Kristen Campbell is a gluten-free, natural beauty expert. Diagnosed with severe gluten intolerance, she tests and tries, then recommends only the very best and purest gluten-free cosmetic products on her website www.NaturallyDahling.com. She is also the co-founder of www.GlutenFreeFox.com the world's first gluten-free search engine.

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  • Related Articles

    Janet Doggett
    This article appeared in the Winter 2008 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Celiac.com 07/19/2008 - When I was 6 years old, I lived in Dallas, Texas, and I had a best friend named Judy. It was at her house that I first ate a bagel. I fell in love with its chewy, crusty texture. I didn’t know much at that age, but I knew that I loved eating those bagels – I couldn’t get enough.
    I also knew, from a very young age, that something was wrong with me. Something that they would one day discover and name after me. I had stomachaches all the time. I can’t remember a time when my stomach didn’t hurt at least a little bit.
    “You were so healthy when you were young,” my mother is fond of saying. Painfully shy and uncomplaining–yes. Healthy, no. We were just blissfully unaware of what lay in wait for future doctors to discover.
    In high school, I was anemic, and experienced several bouts of tachycardia that were written off to anxiety. And then after I was married, I twice struggled with infertility. Later, the “stomachaches” returned and worsened and doctors removed my gallbladder thinking that stones were to blame and then my uterus thinking it might be hormones causing my symptoms.
    Along the way, in trying to diagnose me, doctors discovered insulin-dependent diabetes, low thyroid and high cholesterol. I also have bipolar disorder. I take a combination of 13 medications a day for my health maintenance, and I’ve been to the hospital at least 18 times in the past year. But still, I felt that they hadn’t hit upon that one thing that was really wrong, that was causing my stomach to hurt so badly.
    Then, two years ago, I had added “severe bone pain” to my ever-growing list of symptoms and went to see a rheumatologist. He refused to believe it was a simple case of arthritis and tested me for malnutrition. I had no Vitamin D in my blood – a tell tale sign that something was wrong with my gut. Next came the antibody test and then a biopsy that proved that the tiny villi that lined my intestines were indeed “flattened.” We had a diagnosis after only 10 years of actively seeking one. I had celiac disease, an auto-immune disease where you can’t digest wheat or gluten, the wheat protein.
     “What? I can’t eat bread? I can’t have bagels?”
    I was sure I would starve to death when I heard that this removal of all glutens from the diet was the only treatment for the disease whereby the lining of a person’s intestines is badly damaged. If left untreated, it can lead to things like malnutrition, brain ataxia, osteopenia, and eventually a cancer called lymphoma.
    More specifically, what was happening was the lining of my intestines was shriveling, shrinking in reaction to the gluten in the bread or other products made with wheat. The damaged intestines repair themselves with the removal of gluten from the diet, but it must be strictly adhered to for life. Even the smallest taste of wheat or gluten would immediately return my villi that line the intestines to a flattened mass. 
    At first I was afraid to eat anything. All day long, gluten loomed at me from dark corners. At night I dreamt of bagels and pizza.
    The problem is that gluten is hidden in many foods. Obviously it is in bread, bagels, pizza, pasta, most fried foods (all wheat flour-based products) but it also is in many processed foods like canned soups and salad dressings, ice creams, foods made with caramel color, malt, barley, rye, HVP, spelt, and the list goes on. It also means that I must use separate utensils to butter my gluten-free bread, separate pots and pans to cook my food and separate colanders to drain my corn or rice-based pastas. Even certain toothpastes and lipsticks are suspect.
    To have celiac disease means that you no longer can rely on that convenience factor of ordering take-out or eating fast-food. It means that you have to be prepared each and every time you eat, bringing with you sauces and dressings, buns and breads.
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    The Other Celiacs
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    Lack of Awareness
    When we are little kids, we are taught that doctors are there to help us. I have very few doctors who actually help me. I had one doctor -- an endocrinologist – say that they would figure it all out at the autopsy. To have a chronic illness is to realize that there is no cure. You will not be cured. You will learn to live with some amount of pain and illness.
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    Lessons Learned
    I dream of bagels that I can digest that taste good. I dream of hospitals where treatment comes without scrutiny and care comes with respect.
     And I dream of a place I can go and be welcomed where “everybody knows the name” of celiac sprue. A place where people understand that it is not a simple thing to just“eliminate gluten” from one’s diet as gluten – the wheat protein – isin many, many foods, some obvious, yes, but many hidden, too.
    In the meantime, I’m learning to eat to live and not the other way around. And I’m enjoying the simple things in life – the friends who will drive far enough to find a gluten-free restaurant; the same friends who won’t devour the bread basket in front of you!


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/14/2010 - Most people with celiac disease will tell you that faithfully maintaining a gluten-free diet can be very challenging, especially for those who enjoy dining out or in the homes of friends.
    "Going to restaurants or dinner at a friend's house can pose dangers to a person with celiac disease," says said Dr. Ali Keshavarzian, vice chairman of medicine and gastroenterologist at Rush University Medical Center. "It can really impact a person's quality of life."
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    "The purpose of this study is to determine whether participation in one of two mind/body courses can help patients cope with the restricted diet," says Keshavarzian. "It can be very hard and stressful for people with celiac disease to stick to a gluten-free diet."
    Healing existing intestinal damage and preventing further damage means that people with celiac disease must go on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Patients must be trained by health professionals on how to understand safe and unsafe ingredient on food labels, and to spot foods containing gluten in order to make safer, more effective choices when grocery shopping or eating out.
    People with celiac disease or gluten intolerance usually begin to feel better within days of starting a gluten-free diet.
    The small intestine usually heals in three- to six-months in children, but can take several years in adults. A healed intestine means a person now has healthy intestinal villi that can properly absorb nutrients from food into the blood.
    Patients enrolled in the study on Celiac disease and mind/body techniques at Rush will be randomly assigned to two course assignments for eight weeks.
    To be eligible for the study, patients must be over 18 years of age, have received a diagnosis of celiac disease in the past four weeks or within two weeks of starting a gluten-free diet, and have not previously attempted a gluten-free diet.
    Source: ScienceDaily (Jan. 11, 2010)


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/03/2013 - Would you fork over five dollars just for browsing in a store?
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    Georgina told the website that she spent hours giving advice to as many as 60 people per week, who would go into the store, ask questions, and then leave without buying anything.
    “I’ve had a gut full of working and not getting paid,” Georgina was quoted as saying. “I’m not here to dispense a charity service for Coles and Woolworths to make more money.”

    Lauren Lindsey
    Celiac.com 10/31/2013 - I recently made a post on instagram that gained a significant amount of attention. A before and after photo with a caption that read “dairy and coffee free” had viewers confused. The attention was not due to my physique but instead to the concern of eliminating coffee as part of a wellness regimen. When over 1000 “likes” and 30 comments were made, I realized that little is acknowledged about the matter. There are certainly far worse things for your health than coffee and caffeine yet I’m compelled to share its undesirable effects. I do not claim that drinking coffee ruins your health and take into consideration that every individual has unique dietary needs and intolerances. Years following my celiac diagnosis, eliminating coffee (and dairy) changed my life. I hope it will do the same for you.
    Concerns:
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    There are few things more frustrating than the lack of energy to perform normal tasks. Fatigue is one the most common and difficult symptoms to treat with celiac disease.  When speaking to individuals about coffee consumption typical responses are, "I need the energy, I MUST have my coffee. I can’t go without it.” The irony is that caffeine is a major cause of fatigue. Most of us are familiar with the 2pm crash that comes with the workday. “Well no worries, I’ll have another cup of coffee” you might say. – This is where trouble begins. When it comes to caffeine, fatigue is determined by the amount of milligrams consumed. Studies have shown that fatigue heightened in individuals who had three cups of coffee and was the highest in those who had five cups.
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    Deflated Mood and Cognition
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    IBS & Acidic Content
    “It sounds like caffeine is the culprit not coffee. So I’ll have decaf more often.”
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    Achieving regularity by means of coffee consumption may indicate the need for dietary changes. Using pro-biotics and eating adequate amounts of fiber achieve regularity and are conducive towards overall health.  Even if the constant need for the bathroom is not an issue, consider caffeine’s diuretic effects such as dehydration, impaired digestion, and constipation.
    Weight Retention
    “I like coffee because it curves my appetite.”
    Adrenaline stimulation releases and emits stored blood sugar. Insulin releases and blood sugar drops below normal. You’ll be hungrier than before in no time.
    Keep in mind that excess insulin is known to:
     
        Promote the storage of fat = weight gain     Retain sodium = holds water weight and causes high blood pressure     Increase amounts of inflammatory compounds in your blood! Inflammation is a killer and especially dangerous in increasing symptoms for those with celiac disease. I believe that individuals suffering from gastrointestinal disorders could greatly improve their life by eliminating coffee. I also understand that making such claims are “fighting words” for those who love their daily brew. Although uncomfortable and challenging to give up, consider the potential hindrance coffee and caffeine poses for healing. It may be your answer and missing ingredient to feeling better.  
    Best of luck.
    Sources:
    Active Wellness By Gayle Reichler MS RD CDN, page 12 Disease Prevention And Treatment by Life Extension Foundation, page 739 Textbook of Natural Medicine Volumes 1-2 by Joseph E Pizzorno and Michael T Murray, page 433 Caffeine Blues By Stephen Cherniske MS, page 10 Lane, J.D. 1994. Neuroendrocine Responses to Caffeine in the Work Environment. Psychosomatic Medicine. 546:267-70. Rao, S.S., Welcher, K., Zimmermn, B. and Stumbo 1998. Is coffee a colonic stimulant?

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au