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    Scott Adams
    This article comes to us from Karoly Horvath, M.D., khorvath@POL.NET, who is one of the two directors of the celiac center at University of Maryland in Baltimore.
    Breast milk contains antibodies against all the antigens the mothers immune system has met prior to or during the pregnancy and has produced antibodies to them.
    This system is the wisdom of nature and this is the way that mothers milk protects babies from all the antigens (infectious agents, toxins etc.) occurring in the environment where the mother lives. These antigens without this protection may enter the body through the digestive or respiratory systems. The best example is that breast milk protects babies from bacteria causing diarrheas in the underdeveloped countries.
    The antibodies are produced by the cells (plasma cells) localized in the gut and the lung. These cells are migrating to the lactating breast-tissue for hormonal trigger (enteromammal plasma cell circle) and they continue producing these antibodies in the breast. These antibodies appear in the breast milk. In brief, the breast milk may contain all the antibodies the mother has in her digestive and respiratory systems. The function of these antibodies is to block the entrance of antigens infectious agents, toxins, allergens etc) across the digestive or respiratory tract of babies.
    In case of celiac disease, it means that if the mother has circulating antibodies to gliadin, these antibodies appear in the milk. If the breast fed baby ingests gliadin (or the mother ingests accidentally and traces of gliadin appear in the milk) the antibodies in the milk blocks the gliadin and it will not able to cross the intestinal wall and meet with the babys immunosystem. Theoretically, the breast-fed infant do not have any immunoreaction to gliadin. If the mother accidentally ingests gliadin during breast feeding it is likely that the concentration of antigliadin antibodies become higher in the breast milk.
    To answer the question: the antibodies in breast milk are protective and do not "trigger" celiac disease in genetically predisposed babies. There are several data showing that breast-feeding has a protective effect in case of celiac disease. Furthermore, it is well documented that breast-feeding in the first year of life decreases the risk of allergies by 50% in babies whose parents have allergies.
    As far as the reaction after weaning concerned: it is also known that babies may have some reaction (loose stool or spit up or discomfort) transiently after introducing a new food, however, this is a temporary symptom and not allergy or immunoreaction to the food. It is likely that their digestive system should accommodate to the new foods.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/10/2009 - A UK mother-turned-entrepreneur is about to notch the one-million loaf sales mark for the gluten-free bread she invented to help her sons’ food allergies.  Launched by Lucinda Bruce-Gardyne in April, Genius bread originally made its debut exclusively at British supermarket giant Tesco, which had just debuted its "Free From" line of products.
    Genius has expanded to other retailers, including Asda and Waitrose, and will make its way into Sainsbury’s in the new year.  Also available in Ireland, Genius is eyeing plans to launch in a number of overseas markets. The bread has "just taken off,” she said.
    Bruce-Gardyne, who previously worked at top London restaurant Bibendum and has written recipe books for food allergy sufferers, began developing her gluten-free bread three years ago, after finding existing products to be lacking in quality. “They were packed with stabilizers and preservatives,” she said.
    Working from her home kitchen in Edinburgh, Bruce-Gardyne spent several hours a day crafting her recipe for bread that looked and tasted like regular, commercial gluten-containing bread. Her effort was not without its challenges. She was "baking constantly," she says, and “I broke my oven twice because of overuse,” she said.
    She teamed up with United Central Bakeries, a specialty industrial baking company, at an early stage of development, and the company now bakes all the bread sold under the Genius brand. She also has the good fortune to have support from Sir Bill Gammell, the boss of Cairn Energy, who suffers from gluten intolerance. Their children attend the same school, and the two met after Sir Bill sampled the former chef’s bread. He has become keen to help commercialize it.
    To date, the business has attracted investment of between $1.6 million and $3.3m and sales are running at about $4 million.  Genius sells an average 45,000 loaves a week at about $4 each. Bruce-Gardyne is optimistic about the company's future. Genius is looking to diversify: “We have 18 new products coming out including pre-sliced bread, rolls and ciabatta” said Bruce-Gardyne. She is also working on a gluten-free croissant. “Nothing will be launched unless it tastes as good or better than the mainstream alternative."
    Will Genius bread make it to America? Stay tuned…
    More: Times Online


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/16/2012 - It's official! After an international conference to address gluten-sensitivity, fifteen experts from seven countries have announced the development of a nomenclature and classification system making gluten-sensitivity a distinct and separate condition from celiac disease.
    Their work on establishing universal medical terms for gluten-sensitivity may serve as a guide to improve the diagnosis and treatment of gluten-related disorders. The experts have published their conclusions and recommendations in "Spectrum of Gluten-Related Disorders: Consensus on New Nomenclature and Classification," which includes a diagnostic roadmap for clinicians. The new consensus appears in the journal BMC Medicine.
    The conference was co-chaired by Alessio Fasano, M.D., professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology and director of the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research (CFCR) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with Carlo Catassi, M.D., M.P.H., co-director of CFCR and professor of pediatrics at the Universita Politecnica delle Marche in Ancona, Italy, and Anna Sapone, M.D., Ph.D., of the Seconda Universita of Naples.
    Gluten sensitivity, a condition causing gastrointestinal distress and other clinical symptoms, has been identified by the international panel of experts as a distinct entity on the spectrum of gluten-related disorders that includes wheat allergy and celiac disease.
    “For the first time," says Dr. Catassi, "we have provided an accurate diagnostic procedure for gluten sensitivity. We have confirmed that to correctly diagnose gluten sensitivity, we need to exclude celiac disease and wheat allergy with the appropriate diagnostic tests.”
    Whereas about 1 in a hundred or so people has celiac disease, Dr. Fassano estimates about "60 to 70 percent" of the people coming to his clinic for treatment actually suffer from gluten sensitivity.
    Overall, an estimated six percent of people of European descent may be affected by gluten sensitivity, which would make it of the most common pathologies in the world today.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/27/2014 - Here are seven common myths people have about celiac disease and gluten-free eating.
    Myth #1: Rice contains gluten, and people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance shouldn’t eat it.
    Status: FALSE.
    People with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance have adverse immune reactions to gluten proteins in wheat, rye and barley.
    Rice does contain gluten, just not the kind that causes adverse reactions in people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. Plain rice is fine for people with celiac disease.
    Myth #2: A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat.
    Status: MOSTLY FALSE.
    Gluten levels above 20 parts per million can cause adverse immune reactions and chronic damage in people with celiac disease.
    Current medical research defines gluten-levels below 20 parts per million as safe for people with celiac disease, and the FDA and other official organizations use that standard in labeling, those levels are so close to zero as to be “gluten-free.”
    The tiniest crumbs of bread far exceed 20ppm, so eating “a little” gluten is only possible by eating “gluten-free” food. In fact, the only properly recognized treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet.
    Myth #3: Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease.
    Status: FALSE
    Just because food is made with gluten-free ingredients, it is not necessarily safe for people with celiac disease. Case in point, Domino’s Pizza recently introduced gluten-free pizza crusts. However, these pizzas are prepared in the same areas and ovens as Domino’s regular pizzas, and are likely contaminated with gluten from wheat flour. These pizzas are not safe for people with celiac disease. There are many similar cases in the restaurant world. Contamination is a serious issue for some celiacs, so buyers be aware and be wary.
    Myth #4: Celiac disease is a food allergy.
    Status: FALSE
    Celiac disease is not a food allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease. People with celiac disease suffer damage to the lining of the small intestine when they eat wheat, rye or barley. They also face higher risks for many other auto-immune conditions.
    Myth #5: Celiac disease only affects people of European ancestry
    Status: FALSE
    Celiac disease is more common in people of northern European ancestry, but it affects all ethnic groups and is found in southern Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South America.
    Myth #6: Celiac disease is a children’s condition
    Status: FALSE
    Celiac disease can develop at any age. In fact, celiac disease is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 40-60 years old.
    Myth #7: Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening.
    It’s true that classic celiac disease symptoms, like stomach pain, bone pain, fatigue, headaches, skin rash, and digestive issues, won’t kill patients outright. However, undiagnosed or untreated, celiac disease can trigger other autoimmune disorders, and leave patients at much greater risk of developing certain types of deadly cancer.

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    Im the same, I never know what to eat, some food does better than others for me, I went on to make my own soup and Im glad I did, I should do it more often and at least then J know what's going in to it, it wasn't the best first try but I enjoyed it haha
    Thank you for the advice, in the end I went and made my own soup, not great for my first try but it was better than potentially making myself worse, I enjoyed it, I got some vitamains too to take, I was able to find a liquid Vitamain B Complex, the store I went to was helpfull enough to show me what was Gluten Free.   I fealt awful around then, Im feeling like I have more energy now I can actually do things and focus more, Ill keep on like I have been, Im not 100% and still have some B
    Not to mention the fact that (for those using the Nima) the Nima sensor has been known to give false positives. https://www.theverge.com/2019/4/1/18080666/nima-sensor-testing-fda-food-allergy-gluten-peanut-transparency-data https://www.celiac.ca/cca-statement-nima-gluten-sensor/ https://www.allergy-insight.com/nima-is-it-really-96-9-accurate/ https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/troubling-gluten-testing-data-released-by-nima-but-hold-the-phone/ https://www.glutenfreew
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