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    How NOT to Get Gluten-free Food in Jail


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 10/18/2010 - Should you be unlucky enough to find yourself in jail and also find yourself angered by the dearth of gluten-free food choices, DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT write a note to jail staff in which you threaten to "start blowing up buildings and killing everyone" when you get out, as Geoffrey R. Yates, 27, is alleged to have done recently in Seattle's King County Jail.


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    The reason it's a bad idea to express your anger by making bomb threats is because the authorities tend to take you at your word, or at least feel that the matter warrants further investigation, if not prosecution.

    For Yates, a convicted killer already jailed for violating his parole on a manslaughter conviction on a 2001 slaying, that means felony charges after telling King County Jail staff that he was planning a murderous rampage in part because his dietary concerns -- he claimed to need wheat-free food -- weren't being addressed in jail.

    In the note, Yates, 27, allegedly threatened to "start blowing up buildings and killing everyone" if he were released.

    That means Yates will likely spend a lot more time in the very same King's County Jail that seems to have little or no ability or inclination to address the gluten-free complaints that led to his threats in the first place.

    So, one more time. Bomb threats: Bad way to get released from jail. Bad way to get gluten-free food in jail. Bad way to do pretty much anything except get in trouble.

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    Guest HeatherT

    Posted

    The thing is: people with murderous rages often DO need gluten free food. Me being one. Me on wheat is just not the same as me on my regular diet. I do not know what I would do if I was imprisoned ... the wheat really *does* kill my brain and makes me into Mr. Hyde.

     

    There have been several studies though, about the effect of food on inmates. The fact we basically feed our inmates junk is a travesty of justice ... so many people get better just by feeding them well.

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    very good article, but for me I am going to try my best to stay out of jail. I often wonder when I get older how many nursing homes will make sure I get a gluten free diet--that's scary!

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    Guest Gloria Brown

    Posted

    With thirty percent of schizophrenics having celiac disease, a study determining the percentage of inmates who are gluten intolerant may indeed be worthwhile.

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    With thirty percent of schizophrenics having celiac disease, a study determining the percentage of inmates who are gluten intolerant may indeed be worthwhile.

    You are so right! My little brother is schizophrenic, and unfortunately he is in jail for bomb threats. I am attempting right now to find a way to convince jail officials to accommodate his dietary needs. The attorney said that he is getting extremely thin and unwell looking.

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  • Related Articles

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Recently I have noticed a trend in articles that demonize the gluten-free diet, and imply that there is something unhealthy or even dangerous about it. Here is an example of one that I forwarded to Dr. Ron Hoggan:
    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11017/1118230-114.stm
    and below is his response to its author:
    Dear China Millman,
    Thank you for your interesting article on gluten-free dieting.  I was very pleased to read that you include patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity among those who should follow a gluten free diet.  I assume that you have arrived at your estimate of 20 million who are afflicted with wheat allergy, non-celiac and celiac gluten sensitivity using Dr. Fasano’s  estimate that 6 to 7 percent of Americans have what you refer to as this “milder form of gluten intolerance”.  There are other estimates. For instance, Dr. Kenneth Fine did random blood draws at a shopping center in Dallas, Texas and found an 11% rate of gluten sensitivity. Congruently, Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou has reported rates as high as 12% in the United Kingdom and Dr. Rodney Ford reports a prevalence estimate of 10% in New Zealand.  Each investigator used different methods to arrive at their estimate, and each method is likely to underestimate the true prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. For instance, they all rely on a single class of antibody reaction against a single sub-group of proteins found in gluten grains. Thus, Dr. Fasano’s estimate may be unduly conservative as it is substantially lower than others have found in similar populations and the testing used to arrive at Dr. Fasano's estimate also carries all of the other limitations mentioned above.
    As for the notion that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is milder than celiac disease, Anderson et al, in their study titled “Malignancy and mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with coeliac disease or ‘gluten sensitivity’ World J Gastroenterol 2007 January 7; 13(1): 146-151, report a higher rate of malignancy and early mortality among those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity than among those with celiac disease.  This finding may be the result of the common recommendation that patients ignore test results that show non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as many physicians believe that such results are “non-specific” and do not warrant a gluten free diet. However, it may also reflect that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a more serious illness than celiac disease. It may also reflect something entirely different than these two interpretations, but it does make a very good case for the need for more research in this very neglected area.
    As for the comments by Heather Mangieri and the American Dietetics Association, they might benefit from reading studies such as the one by Dr. Cheng et al titled “Body Mass Index in Celiac Disease Beneficial Effect of a Gluten-free Diet” in the 2009 Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. They found that, after diagnosis with celiac disease, about half of the overweight and obese patients lost weight. Given the conservative data you report, suggesting that at least 90% of American cases of celiac disease go undiagnosed, there can be little doubt that a large portion of those with undiagnosed celiac disease who are overweight or obese would be likely to lose weight. The number who would lose weight should be greater among those who chose to follow a gluten free diet to lose weight, as some of those who are diagnosed with celiac disease do not comply with the diet.  If one accepts the proposition that those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, IBS, and IBD often have similarly problematic reactions to gluten, the number of Americans who could lose weight and live healthier, and therefore happier, lives (eating a gluten free diet) rises exponentially.
    On a personal level, my mother lost 66 pounds during her first years on a gluten free diet. Now, some 15 years later, she has lost almost 100 pounds. I doubt that she would still be alive had she not undertaken the gluten free diet purely on the basis of test results suggestive of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  
    In the current context of excessive under-diagnosis of celiac disease and limited understandings of the dynamics by which a gluten free diet causes weight loss among celiac patients, and an enormously greater number of Americans who have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, it is difficult to understand why anyone would be cautioned against following a gluten free diet with weight loss as their objective.  Whether these individuals are undiagnosed celiac patients, have undiagnosed non-celiac gluten sensitivity, or they find that a gluten free diet is helping them to achieve their body mass objectives, there is little legitimate cause to "warn" people away from a gluten free diet. Overall, your article does raise awareness of gluten as a potential health threat, so its overall impact is positive despite the misinformation that a gluten free diet does not help with weight loss.
    Sincerely,
    Ron Hoggan, Ed. D.
    Royal Roads University, Continuing Studies

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/30/2012 - Rates of autoimmune disease are on the rise, and not just in the United States, with diseases like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and lupus being diagnosed in increasingly higher numbers.
    Rates of type 1 diabetes, for example, rose 23%, from 2001 to 2009, according to the American Diabetes Association, with a similar increase reported in Finland.
    Researchers for the Center for Disease Control have no good explanation for the surge, which is not due simply to better diagnosis.
    Epidemiologists in Norway have been arguing that the rising rates are are the result of a genuine "biological change of the disease," not the result of better diagnostics. They are concerned about higher rates of autoimmunity in urban areas compared to their rural counterparts.
    Swedish and German researchers concur that enhanced diagnostics alone cannot explain the current rise in MS.
    Meanwhile, celiac disease also seems to be on the rise in the United States, with recent population-based data suggest a sharp increase in rates over the last several decades.
    As science has helped eliminate worms from our bodies, once a common intestinal parasite, the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has gone from 1 in 10,000 people to one in 200.
    Deaths and complications from lupus are also on the rise.
    According to a new study published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, there was a significant increase in end-stage renal disease in young people over the period from 1995 to 2006. Of those with the condition, half were African American. In fact, blacks suffer end-stage renal disease at rates six to seven times greater than whites.
    Dr. Frederick Miller of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences agrees with Ladd. He also believes that the surge in autoimmune disease diagnosis likely has an environmental component.
    So, what does all this mean? At the moment, there is no clear answer. Numerous researchers are busy studying the more than 80 different types of autoimmune disease, and struggling to find causes and develop treatments.
    According to Dr. Miller, research offers the best way to fight rising rates of autoimmune disease, by helping to understand the genetic and environmental risk factors. This will help doctors spot those at risk for developing any given disease after certain environmental exposures, and perhaps to minimize those exposures and prevent the disease from developing in the first place.
    In the mean time, people with celiac disease and other autoimmune conditions can only continue their own treatments, and perhaps find some small solace in knowing that they are not alone, and that science is working to provide answers.
    Source:
    American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/26/2012 - Halloween means that many parents of children who must avoid gluten are wondering which Halloween candies are safe for kids and grown-ups on a gluten–free diet?
    Below, is an updated list of gluten–friendly and gluten–free Halloween candies currently available.
    Below that we feature a list of UNSAFE, NON–gluten–free candies, as well as a partial list of manufacturers with links to their company websites.
    Please remember that this list is not complete, or definitive, and should only be used as a guideline. Before consuming any candy on the list, be sure to gauge your purchases according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.
    Gluten-free and Gluten-safe Candy List for Halloween 2012:
    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate
    A
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead
    B
    Baby Ruth original and fun size
    Barrels of Candy
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls
    Bit•O•Honey
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop and gum
    Butterfinger bar, original and fun size
    C
    Cadbury Adams Swedish Fish
    Cadbury Adams Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew original and fun size
    Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Candy Carnival Package – Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks – Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby
    Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    Crispy Cat Mint Coconut Candy Bar
    Crispy Cat Toasted Almond Candy Bar
    Crispy Cat Chocolate Marshmallow Candy Bar
    D
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix – jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots
    Dove pieces – Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops)
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix - Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops
    Ferrara Pan Caramels
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix – including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Goldenberg's peanut chews
    Goobers
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Haribo Gold-Bears
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size - contains almonds
    Hershey’s Kisses (Candy Corn flavored candy, Caramel, Caramel Apple flavored filling, Milk Chocolate, Chocolate Meltaway, Pumpkin Spice, Hugs, Hugs & Kisses, Cherry Cordial Creme, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Special Dark)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bars and snack-size bars
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack-size bars
    Hershey’s Nuggets (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Toffee and Almonds, Special Dark, Special Dark with Almonds)
    Hot Tamales
    Hubba Bubba Gum
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans – gluten–free, dairy–free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews
    Jr. Mints fun size – may contain eggs
    Jujifruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    Lifesavers
    LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet ‘n’ Sour, and Scary Assortment
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's – except pretzel M&M's
    Mars Dove chocolate products
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini’s – may contain almonds
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine)
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Mike and Ike
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars
    Mr. Goodbar
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses – does contain peanuts
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit–O–Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers – does contain peanuts
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets – made on equipment that processes peanuts
    Nestle Sno–Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    Nik-L-Nip wax bottles with juice
    Now and Later
    O
    Oh Henry!
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups – does contain peanuts
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy – maple and roasted peanuts
    Pearson’s Mint Patties,
    Pearson’s Nut Goodies
    Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls
    Peeps Jack–O–lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats
    Pez candy
    Pop Rocks
    Popcorn Expressions Kettle Corn Snack Bags
    Pixie Stix
    Pure Fun Halloween Pure Pops
    R
    Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Razzles candy gum
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Riviera Spooky Candy Rings
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl’d Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun-size
    Smarties
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sno-Caps
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews and fun-size
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Surf Sweets Gummy Worms
    Surf Sweets Gummy Swirls
    Surf Sweets Gummy Bears
    Surf SweetsFruity Bears
    Surf Sweets Jelly Beans
    Surf Sweets Sour Worms
    Surf Sweets Sour Berry Bears
    Swedish Fish
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy
    T
    Tootsie Pops – original and mini
    Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Canpeasron's salted nut rolldy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix–Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix–Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    X
    X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones
    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.

    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN OR MAY CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Packaging states that Airheads are: “Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour.”
    Airheads.com FAQs state that: “Airheads do not contain gluten; however, they are processed in a facility that uses wheat flour" so the company "does not that Airheads are gluten free.”
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour
    ANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free
    CADBURY ADAMS
    Sour Patch Xploderz
    CHUCKLES
    Chuckles Ju Jubes
    FARLEY'S
    Harvest Mix and Candy Corn – This product is made by Brach’s. See the Brach’s listings.
    FRANKFORD
    Frankford Fun Size Mix (Peanut Butter, Caramel and Crispy Chocolate Covered Candies) Crispy Candies
    Gummy Body Parts
    SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties
    GOETZE
    Goetze’s Caramel Creams – Contain wheat flour, milk, and soy.
    HARIBO
    Black Licorice Wheels
    Brixx
    Fruity Pasta
    Konfekt and Pontefract Cakes
    Red Licorice Wheels
    Sour S’ghetti
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Reese's Minis
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    Hershey’s Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate) – No gluten ingredients, but not on Hershey’s official gluten-free list.
    Hershey's Good & Plenty
    Hershey's Milk Duds
    Hershey’s Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way – contains barley malt
    Twix – contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx – contains wheat flour
    Crunch – contains barley malt
    Hundred Grand Bar – contains barley malt
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free.
    PALMER
    Palmer Bag of Boo’s fudge bars
    Palmer Tricky Treats (mix of Googly Eyes, Boneheads, and Pumpkin Patch chocolate candies)
    Palmer Trick or Treat Mix
    Palmer Peppermint Patties
    RUSSELL STOVER'S – Russell Stover's products are produced on equipment that also processes peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat gluten.
    WONKA
    Wonka Bar
    Wonka Chewy Runts
    Wonka Chewy Spree
    Wonka Giant and Mini Chewy SweeTarts
    Wonka Nerds
    Wonka Oompas
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chewy
    Wonka Shockers
    Wonka Sweetarts Gummy Bugs – contains wheat/gluten
    Wonka Sweetarts Rope – contains wheat/gluten
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix
     
    Sources and Additional Resources:
    A more comprehensive list of safe and unsafe candies for Halloween can be found at celiacfamily.com. About.com Celiaccentral.com DivineCaroline.com Surefoodliving.com Foodallergyfeast Medpedia Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them: Hershey's – 800–468–1714. Here's a link to Hershey's official gluten-free list. Jelly Belly – 800–522–3267 Just Born – 888–645–3453 Just Born Gluten-free FAQs Mars Chocolate – 800–627–7852 Necco – 781–485–4800 Nestle USA – 800–225–2270 Pearson's – 800–328–6507 Tootsie Roll – 773–838–3400

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
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    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
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    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 06/15/2018 - There seems to be widespread agreement in the published medical research reports that stuttering is driven by abnormalities in the brain. Sometimes these are the result of brain injuries resulting from a stroke. Other types of brain injuries can also result in stuttering. Patients with Parkinson’s disease who were treated with stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, an area of the brain that regulates some motor functions, experienced a return or worsening of stuttering that improved when the stimulation was turned off (1). Similarly, stroke has also been reported in association with acquired stuttering (2). While there are some reports of psychological mechanisms underlying stuttering, a majority of reports seem to favor altered brain morphology and/or function as the root of stuttering (3). Reports of structural differences between the brain hemispheres that are absent in those who do not stutter are also common (4). About 5% of children stutter, beginning sometime around age 3, during the phase of speech acquisition. However, about 75% of these cases resolve without intervention, before reaching their teens (5). Some cases of aphasia, a loss of speech production or understanding, have been reported in association with damage or changes to one or more of the language centers of the brain (6). Stuttering may sometimes arise from changes or damage to these same language centers (7). Thus, many stutterers have abnormalities in the same regions of the brain similar to those seen in aphasia.
    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2018 - There have been numerous reports that olmesartan, aka Benicar, seems to trigger sprue‐like enteropathy in many patients, but so far, studies have produced mixed results, and there really hasn’t been a rigorous study of the issue. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether olmesartan is associated with a higher rate of enteropathy compared with other angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).
    The research team included Y.‐H. Dong; Y. Jin; TN Tsacogianis; M He; PH Hsieh; and JJ Gagne. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA; the Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Science at National Yang‐Ming University in Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Hepato‐Gastroenterology, Chi Mei Medical Center in Tainan, Taiwan.
    To get solid data on the issue, the team conducted a cohort study among ARB initiators in 5 US claims databases covering numerous health insurers. They used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for enteropathy‐related outcomes, including celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy. In all, they found nearly two million eligible patients. 
    They then assessed those patients and compared the results for olmesartan initiators to initiators of other ARBs after propensity score (PS) matching. They found unadjusted incidence rates of 0.82, 1.41, 1.66 and 29.20 per 1,000 person‐years for celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy respectively. 
    After PS matching comparing olmesartan to other ARBs, hazard ratios were 1.21 (95% CI, 1.05‐1.40), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88‐1.13), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10‐1.36) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01‐1.07) for each outcome. Patients aged 65 years and older showed greater hazard ratios for celiac disease, as did patients receiving treatment for more than 1 year, and patients receiving higher cumulative olmesartan doses.
    This is the first comprehensive multi‐database study to document a higher rate of enteropathy in olmesartan initiators as compared to initiators of other ARBs, though absolute rates were low for both groups.
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics