• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    72,182
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Jkuhn
    Newest Member
    Jkuhn
    Joined
  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 0

    HOW TO BE YOUR OWN GLUTEN-FREE DIET ADVOCATE


    Nicole Vela

    Celiac.com 06/17/2014 - Ever notice how much our social lives are based around food? Or how much food is all around us? I took my son to a local children’s exhibit today with shops and about twenty different restaurants, cafes and bakeries we had to walk by. Do I feel bad always having to say no? Of course I do. What mom wouldn’t? There may have been some safe choices but I try to do my research ahead of time when I can call the places to see what their cross contamination procedures are.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Photo: CC--mira66We don’t ever get a day off from food allergies. It is constant. I think one of the best things you can do on a gluten free diet is to inform others,actively campaign for yourself and share information. Not only does this help out the gluten-free community but it also can make your life easier.

    Here are a few ways you can do this.

    If you go to restaurants where you have a chatty server or have the opportunity to speak with the manager or owner talk to them about cross contamination and what you expect when dining out. Inform them about kitchen and staff training for their establishments, the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness GREAT Kitchens and The Gluten-Free Food Service Training and Management Accreditation Program by the Gluten Intolerance Group are both excellent programs. I think a lot of restaurant owners aren’t aware of how serious the risks are and how the tiniest crumb can make us sick.

    I am not a big fan of grocery shopping in general and really don’t want to have to go to several stores a week to get what I need. I am pretty picky on my gluten-free bread and pizzas, I hate to spend money on a product I am not going to like. I frequently put in request at my supermarket customer service counter for them to carry certain brands. Guess what it works and the stores want you to do it. The gluten-free market exploded over the past few years, most big grocery stores don’t already know the favorites of the consumers.

    Educate your friends and family. Thanks to social media we have the opportunity to spread information like never before. There are a ton of great infographics on symptoms and gluten-free foods and safety. For me one of the hardest things is how social eating is.Getting invited over for dinner is tough. My friends have good intentions but just aren’t aware of all the foods that may contain gluten and how to properly handle food prep. I know I can be somewhat shy when it comes to this. It is hard to explain to people why spices may contain gluten or that barbecue sauce. It can make you seem overly picky and I don’t like to be a burden. If that is the way you feel hey I get it. But don’t be nice and just eat food without questioning. It’s not worth it. If you don’t feel comfortable enough to explain everything to someone, I normally bring my own food or eat beforehand. A lot of times I try to just keep things simple and suggest we meet for coffee or for a walk.

    Unfortunately there are going to be people that don’t food sensitivities seriously. Food allergies are being made fun of in the media too often. Always remember to put your health first.

    I hope that you find what I have shared helpful. Please feel free to share some of the ways you inform others and help the gluten-free community.



    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Beatriz

    Posted

    I can't agree more on how less spontaneous I can be now that I am gluten free. I attended a wedding this weekend where they served ice cream. My gluten-free daughter wanted some but the serving staff could not tell me if it was gluten free. I know. It was just vanilla ice cream. How could it possibly have gluten? Well, I was upset that the staff could not tell me the ingredients. My daughter at 4 years old proved to be more flexible than me and appeared not to care so much that we could not have the ice cream or the toppings since they were self-serve and the cookie crumb topping was right in the middle of the rest of the fruit toppings. Arrrrghh!!! Well, we had a wonderful time at the wedding without ice cream and without vomiting from accidental ingestion. When it comes to eating at someone else's house, my close friends already know that we only eat fruit and fresh veggies at their house and it has to be cut up on a plate (not on their cutting board). To one friend, I gave a cutting board to be kept gluten free at her house since my kids always end up at her house. So far, we have never had reactions from eating fruit and cut up veggies at friends' houses. On other occasions we just invite friends to our house for dinner or bring our dinner over to their houses. So far, it has worked out. But I never leave the house without back up food.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Coloradosue

    Posted

    What get's me is that these so-called natural stores don't seem to get that gluten free foods have to be stored SEPARATE from wheat, barley, and rye foods! I personally talked to that day manager as to why this isn't being done. Strangely enough, having a gluten sensitive herself and after being showed a shelf where gluten-free and regular boxed crackers where stored next to each other despite the fact that cross contamination could cause serious problems, we both promised to contact the stores headquarters with suggestions on arranging gluten-free items totally separate in area of the store. Still waiting on reply.

    And as soon as my so-called friends found out about my gluten-free diagnosis, the invitations stopped coming. And I no longer try to make friends. SUCKS!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Being recently diagnosed with 30+ years of gluten loving happily shoveled down my throat and an 8-year old still grieving the end of fast food mostly burgers it's hard. Unlike peanut or shellfish allergies where you can see an reaction I get that eye roll of here we go, you're just a trend following yuppie parent with a groan in passing. Eating now becomes a scavenger hunt with passing the boxes or bags between both parents before hoping what they say is true and it doesn't taste or resemble pretend food. I've only met one server that understood my grilling or great at practicing their acting skills. There's so many hidden gluten sources I can relate to the wedding ice cream post. Why would you need any gluten in basic not mixed with toppings flavors? I don't know other than to cut production costs. My daughter is so freaked that she'll ingest some by accident and miss school mostly a fun activity at school. Her worst was after eating a normal sized muffin, it was a week nursing her stomach trying to rebuild her gut because there's no meds to negate it overnight that I know of. Where the most judgement comes from is at her school. Why can't she have one pancake not like she's going to stop breathing. We have to adjust our whole class party because your kid can't eat normal food grumble even if I offer to provide her food and hover over it to make sure her plate isn't mixed up. If she had a nut allergy it would be pity and due diligence but I feel like a nutjob saying no it's a real condition wanting to scream, "well do you want to clean up her vomit or sit with her on the toilet be my guest." I have to be that mom that says no to everything or pack a lunch for parties hoping she doesn't get tempted by her friends. I can send the links and all that but since they can't see a reaction then it's not that bad a little won't hurt.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   3 Members, 1 Anonymous, 1,307 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Kim Hopkins
    Celiac.com 06/24/2009 - If you are like the majority of people diagnosed with celiac disease, it probably took you many years of experiencing debilitating symptoms, talking to multiple doctors who gave you varied theories and diagnoses, thinking that you would never feel better…before you finally got it figured out.  Whether you had a positive experience with your health care professionals or not, hearing the diagnosis can lead to feeling lost and unsure of what to do next.  It can be quite overwhelming.  After all, food plays an important part in our culture – it’s how we share special moments together, celebrate, and nurture one another.  A big sense of loss can overcome someone when they hear that they can no longer eat wheat, barley, rye, and contaminated oats.  Some people say they go through the roller coaster of emotions similar to the grieving process.
    Can you make the necessary lifestyle adjustments to feel better and regain your health?  Absolutely!  Everyone’s pace is different and you need to give yourself time.  Is there a way that may help you to adjust a bit more quickly and with less frustration?  Yes:  consider hiring a personal coach that specializes in food challenges.
    What Is A Personal Coach?
    Coaching is a powerful, ongoing relationship which focuses on clients making important changes in their lives.  Coaching uses a process of inquiry and personal discovery to build a client’s level of awareness and responsibility, and provides the client with structure, support, and feedback.  The coaching process helps clients to both define and achieve personal and professional goals faster and with more ease than would be possible otherwise.   In coaching, the focus is on designing the future, not getting over the past.
    The field of coaching is booming and there are many coaching niche areas.  Business coaching for executives and teams has become quite popular.  Coaching children and teens to help them excel with academics is on the rise, as is parenting coaching.  Many small business owners higher coaches to help them increase revenue.
    Coaching usually occurs in the context of a long-term relationship, where the client’s goals, dreams, and vision drive the action.  The belief is that there are multiple paths to reach a goal, and that the client knows the way (though they might not realize it at the time).  The coach assists the client to become a “change master.”  To this end, coaching and adjustment to dietary changes go hand-in-hand.
    A Personal Coach Specializing In Dietary Restrictions Can Help You To:

    Learn the gluten-free lifestyle - Where to buy gluten-free food, product reviews, how to prepare gluten-free recipes, where to eat out, how to become a skilled label reader, understanding the safe & unsafe ingredient lists, decrease cross-contamination risk, how to set up your kitchen, where to find out if your cosmetics, hair care products, and medications are safe. Develop a support network - Website resources, how to get the most out of your primary care doctor, engaging a specialist such as a dietician or nutritionist. Vary your diet, taking into consideration essential nutrients. Adjust for the financial impact- Learn to live gluten-free on a budget. Brush up on your advocacy and education skills – Practice explaining celiac to friends, relatives, and coworkers, advocate to you/your child’s school, learn how to eat out safely, manage your anxiety. Monitor any ongoing symptoms and known associate health risks - Iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, fertility problems, leaky gut syndrome, candida, food sensitivities, other auto-immune disorders. Keep up on the latest research and what it may mean for you – there are many exciting studies happening that may have an impact on how you take care of yourself. Assist with other goals to help your life feel more balanced.
    How Does Coaching Work?
    Generally, most coaches have a structure that includes three to four sessions each month, with quick check-ins by phone and email in between.  Coaching sessions can be either one-on-one, in small groups, or a combination of both.  They can be in-person, via phone, or a combination of both throughout the month, which allows for financial and logistical flexibility.  In-person sessions can include shopping, practice with advocating, and cooking.A coach will encourage clients to set goals that they truly want, ask them to do more than they have done on their own, help them focus in order to produce results more quickly, and provide the tools, information, support, and structure to help them accomplish more.   It’s like having a personal trainer to assist you with making adjustments to improve your life.
    Who Should Consider Hiring A Coach?

    If you are feeling unsure as to how to adjust your lifestyle around your food challenges. If you are feeling limited by food allergies/intolerance/sensitivities. If you are not sure where to go for information or are overwhelmed by all the information you are finding. If you are restricting yourself from enjoying going out to restaurants, parties, etc. If you are having difficulty sticking to the gluten-free diet. It’s important to find someone that you “click” with.  Most coachesoffer a free initial session to help get to know them, and to answerany questions you might have about the coaching process.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/18/2011 - Once again, Halloween is around the corner and that means parents of children who must avoid gluten are wondering which candies, especially seasonal and Halloween candies, are safe for kids on a gluten–free diet?
    As awareness of celiac disease and gluten–free diets grows, more parents are demanding gluten–free products, and more manufacturers are responding with gluten–free products.
    Also, more candy makers are clearly marking their candies as gluten–free or containing wheat, gluten, etc. This gives parents and trick–or–treaters a wider range of choices.
    This makes it easier for parents to find gluten–free candies from reliable makers as close as the corner grocery store.
    But, with such a vast array of treats on parade for Halloween night, it can be a challenge to know which ones are safe.
    Below, we feature an updated list of gluten–friendly and gluten–free candies currently available.
    Below that we feature a list of unsafe, NON–gluten–free candies, as well as a partial list of manufacturers with links to their company websites.
    Remember, the list is just a guideline, and should not taken as authoritative or comprehensive. Before consuming any candy on the list, be sure to gauge your purchases according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.

    Gluten–Free  and Gluten-Safe Halloween Candy and Treats

    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate
    A
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead
    B
    Baby Ruth original and fun size
    Barrels of Candy
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls
    Bit•O•Honey
    Butterfinger original and fun size
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop and gum
    C
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew original and fun size
    Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Candy Carnival Package  – Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks – Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby
    Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    D
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix – jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story
    Dove pieces – Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum – may include milk or soy
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) –  no peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. Manufactured on dedicated equipment.
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops –  no peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. Manufactured on dedicated equipment.
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix - Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops
    Ferrara Pan Caramels - may contain milk or soy. Distributed in a facility where peanuts and tree nuts are used to make other products
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix – including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy* – reported issues
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts* – reported issues
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals* – reported issues
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size - does contain almonds
    Hershey’s Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate)
    Hershey’s Kisses (Candy Corn flavored candy, Caramel, Caramel Apple flavored filling, Milk Chocolate, Chocolate Meltaway, Pumpkin Spice, Hugs, Hugs & Kisses, Cherry Cordial Creme, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Special Dark)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bars and snack-size bars
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack-size bars
    Hot Tamales
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans – gluten–free, dairy–free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews
    Jr. Mints fun size – may contain eggs
    Jujifruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet ‘n’ Sour, and Scary Assortment
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's – except pretzel M&M's
    Mars Dove chocolate products
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini’s – may contain almonds
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine)
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Milk Duds
    Mike and Ike
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars –  made on equipment that processes almonds, in a facility that processes peanuts
    Mr. Goodbar – does contain peanuts
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses – does contain peanuts
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit–O–Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers – does contain peanuts
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets –  made on equipment that processes peanuts
    Nestle Sno–Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    Nik-L-Nip wax bottles with juice
    Now and Later
    O
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups – does contain peanuts
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy –  maple and roasted peanuts
    Pearson’s Mint Patties,
    Pearson’s Nut Goodies
    Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls
    Peeps Jack–o–lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats – “Gluten Free”
    Pez candy – “Gluten Free”
    Pop Rocks
    Pixie Stix
    R
    Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Razzles candy gum
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl’d Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun-size
    Smarties – the small pastel–colored candies sold in rolls, not Nestle’s chocolate version) – “Contains NO: gluten, milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy.
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews and fun-size
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts – “Gluten Free”
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Swedish Fish
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy
    T
    Tootsie Pops – original and mini
    Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Canpeasron's salted nut rolldy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix–Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix–Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys,
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix – SweetTart Chews OK, but other packages had a cross–contamination warning!
    X
    X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones
    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.

    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flourANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Reese's Minis
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers –  contains barley malt and wheat flour
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way –  contains barley malt
    Twix –  contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx  –  contains wheat flour
    Crunch –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Hundred Grand Bar –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free.
    RUSSELL STOVER'S  – Products have been produced on shared equipment with peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat.
    WONKA
    Sweetarts Gummy Bugs –  contains wheat/gluten
    Sweetarts Rope –  contains wheat/gluten
    Oompas
    Wonka Bar
    A more comprehensive list of unsafe candies for Halloween can be found at celiacfamily.com.
    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:
    Hershey's – 800–468–1714
    Jelly Belly – 800–522–3267
    Just Born – 888–645–3453
    Mars Chocolate – 800–627–7852
    Necco – 781–485–4800
    Nestle USA – 800–225–2270
    Pearson's – 800–328–6507
    Tootsie Roll – 773–838–3400
    Other resources:
    About.com
    DivineCaroline.com
    Surefoodliving.com


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/26/2012 - Halloween means that many parents of children who must avoid gluten are wondering which Halloween candies are safe for kids and grown-ups on a gluten–free diet?
    Below, is an updated list of gluten–friendly and gluten–free Halloween candies currently available.
    Below that we feature a list of UNSAFE, NON–gluten–free candies, as well as a partial list of manufacturers with links to their company websites.
    Please remember that this list is not complete, or definitive, and should only be used as a guideline. Before consuming any candy on the list, be sure to gauge your purchases according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.
    Gluten-free and Gluten-safe Candy List for Halloween 2012:
    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate
    A
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead
    B
    Baby Ruth original and fun size
    Barrels of Candy
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls
    Bit•O•Honey
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop and gum
    Butterfinger bar, original and fun size
    C
    Cadbury Adams Swedish Fish
    Cadbury Adams Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew original and fun size
    Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Candy Carnival Package – Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks – Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby
    Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    Crispy Cat Mint Coconut Candy Bar
    Crispy Cat Toasted Almond Candy Bar
    Crispy Cat Chocolate Marshmallow Candy Bar
    D
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix – jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots
    Dove pieces – Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops)
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix - Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops
    Ferrara Pan Caramels
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix – including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Goldenberg's peanut chews
    Goobers
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Haribo Gold-Bears
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size - contains almonds
    Hershey’s Kisses (Candy Corn flavored candy, Caramel, Caramel Apple flavored filling, Milk Chocolate, Chocolate Meltaway, Pumpkin Spice, Hugs, Hugs & Kisses, Cherry Cordial Creme, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Special Dark)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bars and snack-size bars
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack-size bars
    Hershey’s Nuggets (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Toffee and Almonds, Special Dark, Special Dark with Almonds)
    Hot Tamales
    Hubba Bubba Gum
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans – gluten–free, dairy–free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews
    Jr. Mints fun size – may contain eggs
    Jujifruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    Lifesavers
    LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet ‘n’ Sour, and Scary Assortment
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's – except pretzel M&M's
    Mars Dove chocolate products
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini’s – may contain almonds
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine)
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Mike and Ike
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars
    Mr. Goodbar
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses – does contain peanuts
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit–O–Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers – does contain peanuts
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets – made on equipment that processes peanuts
    Nestle Sno–Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    Nik-L-Nip wax bottles with juice
    Now and Later
    O
    Oh Henry!
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups – does contain peanuts
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy – maple and roasted peanuts
    Pearson’s Mint Patties,
    Pearson’s Nut Goodies
    Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls
    Peeps Jack–O–lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats
    Pez candy
    Pop Rocks
    Popcorn Expressions Kettle Corn Snack Bags
    Pixie Stix
    Pure Fun Halloween Pure Pops
    R
    Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Razzles candy gum
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Riviera Spooky Candy Rings
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl’d Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun-size
    Smarties
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sno-Caps
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews and fun-size
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Surf Sweets Gummy Worms
    Surf Sweets Gummy Swirls
    Surf Sweets Gummy Bears
    Surf SweetsFruity Bears
    Surf Sweets Jelly Beans
    Surf Sweets Sour Worms
    Surf Sweets Sour Berry Bears
    Swedish Fish
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy
    T
    Tootsie Pops – original and mini
    Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Canpeasron's salted nut rolldy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix–Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix–Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    X
    X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones
    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.

    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN OR MAY CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Packaging states that Airheads are: “Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour.”
    Airheads.com FAQs state that: “Airheads do not contain gluten; however, they are processed in a facility that uses wheat flour" so the company "does not that Airheads are gluten free.”
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour
    ANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free
    CADBURY ADAMS
    Sour Patch Xploderz
    CHUCKLES
    Chuckles Ju Jubes
    FARLEY'S
    Harvest Mix and Candy Corn – This product is made by Brach’s. See the Brach’s listings.
    FRANKFORD
    Frankford Fun Size Mix (Peanut Butter, Caramel and Crispy Chocolate Covered Candies) Crispy Candies
    Gummy Body Parts
    SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties
    GOETZE
    Goetze’s Caramel Creams – Contain wheat flour, milk, and soy.
    HARIBO
    Black Licorice Wheels
    Brixx
    Fruity Pasta
    Konfekt and Pontefract Cakes
    Red Licorice Wheels
    Sour S’ghetti
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Reese's Minis
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    Hershey’s Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate) – No gluten ingredients, but not on Hershey’s official gluten-free list.
    Hershey's Good & Plenty
    Hershey's Milk Duds
    Hershey’s Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way – contains barley malt
    Twix – contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx – contains wheat flour
    Crunch – contains barley malt
    Hundred Grand Bar – contains barley malt
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free.
    PALMER
    Palmer Bag of Boo’s fudge bars
    Palmer Tricky Treats (mix of Googly Eyes, Boneheads, and Pumpkin Patch chocolate candies)
    Palmer Trick or Treat Mix
    Palmer Peppermint Patties
    RUSSELL STOVER'S – Russell Stover's products are produced on equipment that also processes peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat gluten.
    WONKA
    Wonka Bar
    Wonka Chewy Runts
    Wonka Chewy Spree
    Wonka Giant and Mini Chewy SweeTarts
    Wonka Nerds
    Wonka Oompas
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chewy
    Wonka Shockers
    Wonka Sweetarts Gummy Bugs – contains wheat/gluten
    Wonka Sweetarts Rope – contains wheat/gluten
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix
     
    Sources and Additional Resources:
    A more comprehensive list of safe and unsafe candies for Halloween can be found at celiacfamily.com. About.com Celiaccentral.com DivineCaroline.com Surefoodliving.com Foodallergyfeast Medpedia Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them: Hershey's – 800–468–1714. Here's a link to Hershey's official gluten-free list. Jelly Belly – 800–522–3267 Just Born – 888–645–3453 Just Born Gluten-free FAQs Mars Chocolate – 800–627–7852 Necco – 781–485–4800 Nestle USA – 800–225–2270 Pearson's – 800–328–6507 Tootsie Roll – 773–838–3400

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/01/2014 - News that snack foods, like cookies, crackers, salty snacks and snack bars now account for more than half of new gluten-free product sales has some leading analysts and industry representatives sounding the alarm.
    Speaking at a webinar hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists, Ardent Mills’ director of commercial insights, David Sheluga PhD, announced that the market is starting to get a bit saturated with gluten-free snack products, and that he’d like to see "a little bit more distribution of other types of product categories."
    The top-selling gluten-free categories break down as follows: Crackers ($156m), salty snacks ($125m), bread and rolls ($120m), pasta ($78m), cookies ($60m), baking mixes ($55m), RTE cereal ($49m), ancient grains ($47m), snack bars ($45m), flour ($43m), and frozen pizza ($35m).
    Currently, market research company Mintel reckons the US gluten-free retail market topped $10 billion in 2013. This figure includes anything with a gluten-free label, including naturally-gluten-free products.
    When the category is limited to products specifically formulated to replace wheat and where gluten-free is "not just a minor claim among a bundle of others," Dr. Sheluga says the market is likely closer to $1.2 billion. 70% of these sales were driven by heavy buyers, who account for just 3.8% of US households.
    Still, he says that Ardent Mills remains 'pretty bullish' about gluten-free category growth overall. Sheluga points out that almost three-quarters of gluten-free products on the market in 2009 are still available today, whereas 85% of new products disappear from grocery market shelves after just two years.
    Still, Sheluga notes that the market for actual celiac disease patients is limited, and that we may be reaching a point where we can’t push consumers to eat more gluten-free snack.
    So, while he notes that there’s likely still plenty of room for the gluten-free food market to grow, he is among a growing chorus to wonder out loud if we reaching a breaking point where we can’t eat any more snacks?
    The entire webinar may be accessed for a fee at: IFT
     

  • Recent Articles

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764