• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,938
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    jennbai824
    Newest Member
    jennbai824
    Joined
  • 0

    Increased Mortality Rates for Celiacs


    Destiny Stone

    Celiac.com 02/22/2010 - Celiac disease affects approximately 1 in 100 people in the United States. Celiac disease is a genetic disease and the only known cure is a gluten-free diet for life. While most people with celiac disease experience a relief from symptoms while on a gluten free diet, studies are showing an increased mortality rate in patients with the disease compared to the general population.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Out of the 21 papers that have been published over the last 25 years addressing the issue of celiac and mortality rates, the studies show conflicting results, ranging from a 0.52% (decrease) to 3.9% (increase) in mortality rates for patients with celiac compared to the general population. The reasons for the conflicting results are based on the fact that the papers vary vastly from each other, and while some studies are location based or population based, others are cohort based. So for the sake of this particular study, celiac patient's have been categorized into four different groups: symptomatic celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, unrecognized celiac disease and refractory celiac disease. Because these groups of celiac patients differ greatly, it is necessary to analyze their mortality rates individually.

    Ten papers in five different countries studied mortality in patients with symptomatic celiac, or celiac symptoms that indicate the presence of celiac disease in a patient. All ten papers on the subject came to the same conclusion, patients with symptomatic celiac disease have been shown to have a increased mortality rate. The primary reason for increased mortality in these particular patients was found to be caused by complications from celiac disease like gastrointestinal malignancies such as, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and small bowel cancer. Other conditions that led to increased mortality for these patients included, autoimmune conditions, ischemic heart disease and violence (including suicide and accidents).

    Dermatitis herpetiformis is a gluten agitating blistering of the skin which has frequently been associated with celiac disease. Four studies have been conducted on the mortality rates of celiac patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and found that mortality rates did not increase for them compared to the general public.

    Four studies were also conducted to determine the mortality rates of people with unrecognized, and therefore untreated celiac disease. Two of the studies showed no increase in mortality, while the other two (including the United States study) showed a considerable increase in mortality of people with unrecognized celiac disease. The reason for the conflicting evidence can be merited to the difficulty in obtaining non-biased, random subjects for the study.

    Refractory celiac disease is known as an inexorable form of celiac disease. Symptoms associated with refractory celiac do not improve with a gluten-free diet. Refractory celiac disease is classified into two types: type I and type II. Type II refractory celiac patients are inclined to develop enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma and have a lower survival rate than type I patients. While the 5 year survival rate for type I patients is between 80%-96%, those with type II refractory celiac only had a 44%-58% chance of survival which dropped to 8% in those patients that developed enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

    Other studies of mortality rates in celiac patients have indicated that there is a actual amount of gluten that one can exceed which will eventually lead to complications with celiac disease. Thus, if a person continually consumes more gluten than can be processed by their body, usually as a result of malabsorption associated with celiac disease, it is more likely to activate refractory celiac disease and lymphoma in some individuals.

    Overall these studies have aided in proving that compared to the general population, the risk of mortality rates are increased for celiac patients. While mortality rates decreased over time starting from the point of celiac diagnosis, mortality rates tended to increase significantly in patients who did not adhere to a strict gluten free diet. Standard mortality rates doubled for patients who were unlikely to stick to a gluten free diet, and for patients that definitely did not follow a strict gluten free diet, the mortality rate was six times higher. Therefore, if you have celiac disease, early diagnosis and strict adherence to a gluten free diet can be a life-saver, and is very likely to extend and improve your quality of life.

    Source:

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Katrina Shoat

    Posted

    This was so helpful! My daughter really needed this information, and now, after hours of searching, we found our answers here! "THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!" (says my daughter Tiffany). Thank you, celiac.com!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   11 Members, 1 Anonymous, 330 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Wendy Cohan
    Celiac.com 08/28/2008 - Gluten intolerance can affect all the mucous membranes of the body in sensitive individuals, including the bladder lining.  I was diagnosed in 1996 with an incurable, progressive, painful disease called interstitial cystitis.  The symptoms mimic those of a bad bladder infection, although most lab tests are negative for bacteria, and antibiotics generally do not help.  I knew as a nurse how the bladder functions, and that it needs to have an intact lining to tolerate holding all the toxic wastes of the body prior to elimination.  It made sense to me to try a dietary approach, and I had good luck immediately by excluding from my diet known bladder irritants like tomatoes, caffeine, chocolate, citrus, and alcohol, even though most doctors at the time gave diet little credit for a reduction in symptoms.   Nevertheless, the disease did progress over time, and I eventually needed to take pain medications, anti-spasmodics, and other medications to enable me to function.  Every urine test showed that I had significant amounts of blood in my urine.  No one ever tested me for food allergies, gluten intolerance, or considered any other possible cause.  No one suggested that my symptoms were part of a systemic dysfunction in my body.  I had a painful disease, and they would give me as much pain medicine as I wanted, but there was no cure.
    I was no longer getting enough sleep to enable me to function well as a nurse.  I made the choice to stop working for a few years to concentrate on rebuilding my health.  I was in constant pain.  It was about this time that I began turning to alternative practitioners for help, and started experimenting with my diet, as well as having food allergy and sensitivity testing done.  I had some success eliminating the swelling in my pelvic area using castor oil packs, enough so that when I had increased swelling from eating a particular food, I could tell the difference.  Careful observation showed me what did and did not negatively affect my bladder.  Eliminating gluten resolved a long-standing rash on my legs, called dermatitis herpetiformis, and after about two years and a lot of alternative bodywork, my bladder began to significantly recover.  It was the first area to show symptoms, and the last to recover.
    Now, twelve years after my interstitial cystitis diagnosis, my urologist readily agrees that gluten negatively affects the bladder in some portion of her patients, and that eliminating gluten leads to a reduction in symptoms. All of my urine tests are perfectly normal and I sleep at night.  Still, there are almost no published journal articles linking gluten intolerance and the bladder. I am trying to get the word out there, specifically, the idea that we do not have to live with constant pain, and that what we eat can affect our health.
    My future goals include beginning an informal clinical trial in the form of a support group for patients willing to try a gluten-free diet as a treatment for chronic bladder symptoms.  If anyone is interested in the link between bladder symptoms and gluten sensitivity, I have pages of anecdotes gathered from many people who have experienced healing on a gluten-free diet.

    The Connection Between Bladder Symptoms And Gluten Sensitivity - A Collection Of Personal Experiences*
    *Names have been changed to initials to protect individualsprivacy.The author has the originalweb-posts or other identifying information. A summary of web posts from icpuzzle@yahoogroups.com and intersitialcystitischronicpain@yahoogroups.com and personal communications revealing strong evidence of a connection between bladder symptoms and gluten sensitivity. This article is an adjunct/follow-up to the above article on gluten sensitivity and bladder disease.

    …”The main help came from W.’ssuggestion to try to eliminate wheat-barley-rye (gluten).The Elmiron was getting close it it’s maxwithout constantly abusing the situation with gluten…about three months ago Istarted eliminating gluten-carrying grains, “wallah” absolutely the mostsignificant change started happening about 3 or 4 days from the last day ofgluten.  How much better am I now sincethen – about 500% better (close to where I was when I first noticed the IC,even though I didn’t know what was happening – close to TWENTY YEARS AGO).  I am still of the opinion that some kind ofcritters have and maybe still play a part of this.  I have taken every kind of antibiotic, with alittle success now and then, but not enough to kill it.” “It took about 3 months to seemild improvement, about a year to see moderate improvement, and about 2 yearsto feel much better.  I am not 100percent symptom free, but most of the time I am a very manageable level ofsymptoms, and when I flare (from diet or sex) it is very short lived.I am down to one Elmiron a day (from theoriginal dose of 3) and I also do a gluten and sugar free version of the ICdiet, which I also think has helped me a lot.” “I have had IC for 30 yearspretty severely.  It was only this pastyears that I got tested …and found out I had a severe wheat-gluten allergy tothe point that I cannot ingest one bite of anything with wheat or gluten…theysaid my whole digestive tract was inflamed…Over the years I knew I was wheat,dairy, and sugar intolerant but these (latest) tests are more specific and letyou know the levels.  I feel muchstronger and have many days when I am symptom free.  I finally feel different.” “I have started cutting wheat andgluten out of my diet, its been about 2 weeks now.  I, like M., have IBS.  I am feeling better every day.I am following a diet very similar toyours.Thank you for posting it again!” “I have had IC for over adecade.  I have been on a gluten freediet for over 6 years and that has been the only thing that has given me anyrelief from the IC.  I no longer take anymeds at all – haven’t even been to a doctor for the IC in several years.Glad to hear someone else is seeing thebenefits of the gluten-free diet for IC and getting the word out.  I would definitely suggest anyone with ICgive it a try.  It definitely gave me mylife back." “Where have you been for the lasttwenty plus years?You may have saved mylife.I have described these symptomsfor years to doctors and never got an answer that sounded even close to whatwas happening.  Just “try these antibiotics”once in a while at the beginning (there was minimal change), but more and morethe antibiotics got more and more expensive with less and less effect if any atall, it even included the kill-all antibiotic – kills everything except me…Went to nerve doctor ($2,500 plus, pelvic x-rays (2 or 3 types).One of the urologists… never said anythingbut “prostatitis” over and over again. My head now also has a nearperfectly clear thinking ability, before it was always a bit cloudy even thoughI may not have been totally aware of it.The feel of carrying extra weight is now almost gone. The gluten issue may not be theonly issue I have – prostatitis is likely to be part of the pain problem, butthere is no question that the gluten issue has been a very, very large part andis now subsiding.” “I was tested for glutenintolerance but it came out negative but while I awaited results I went gluten free and I felt so goodI never went back.  I have had a lot ofimprovement going gluten and sugar free as well.I can find rice pasta, lasagna etc.easily.  It’s amazing how you don’t haveto try hard to substitute (for) it.” “I have gone from having to gowith urgency every 5 to 10 minutes and being in constant pain (especially atnight) to having almost no symptoms.   I am not “cured”.  I am still working on healing.  I occasionally have a mild flare.  Gradually I am able to add foods back into mydiet – a very different diet than before.  Whole foods, more veggies, only whole grains (no wheat), no sugar, and anoverall more alkaline diet….There is help.  There is hope.” “I am just into the first severalchapters of the book (Solving the IC Puzzle, by Amrit Willis, R.N.), but wantedto stop and ask if there were any people who were celiac or gluten intolerant thatalso suffer from IC.  In my celiacsgroup, there are quite a few that have celiacs that (also) have IC.Autoimmune – allergy – poor lifestyle choices– toxic body – all related.  So, I amwondering if there are others in this IC group that are glutenintolerant/celiacs or who have suffered from, have, or have healed fromautoimmune diseases…” “I have celiac disease also.  I was diagnosed via a blood test about 4months before the IC thing came to a head.  I disregarded the doctor’s warning to stay away from gluten/wheat.I went to a gastroenterologist because I feltlike I was having a stomach flu every 2 weeks.  So I saw this guy and he gave me the blood test results (which Iignored) until finally, I felt so bad I decided to whit the gluten/wheat.I had a friend who has celiac really severelyand she told me that I might as well cancel my hydrodistention to test for ICbecause eliminating wheat/gluten might clear everything up for me.  Unfortunately, I had thehydrodistention which made me much worse, IC-wise….Sorry for the long-windedanswer.I finally stopped taking theElmiron…So far so good.I really don’texpect to have a problem.  It was justhard letting go.  I don’t know which came first(the celiac or the IC).Looking back,every time I drank beer I always felt bloated right away.  Classic example, on our way to skiing, wewould stop for two beers.  Relievingmyself before getting back in the car, I would be dying for the bathroom beforewe reached our destination, 45 minutes later.  I though this was normal.Isuppose it was the celiac and IC kicking in. Too bad it would take 10 years and 3 pregnancies later to diagnose it…” “I have been diagnosed withgluten sensitivity and am gluten-free.  Since I was already eating very little in the way of grains at mynutritionist’s urging, I don’t find the diet that difficult to follow.I try to be very careful.” “I agree with these 2 types ofpastas.  I also find that when I eatwheat (which is an allergy I have) that my bladder gets irritated…” “…So, W. your IC is totally goneright now – especially after cutting out gluten?  I have known for years and years that I wasgluten sensitive as whenever I wouldn’t eat gluten or wheat, if I just atevegetables and protein my stomach would be soooo quiet.Hindsight is 20/20 – just wish I would havegiven up gluten years ago and maybe this wouldn’t have happened.  I am checking into pelvic floortherapy and will have that done along with many other things – I am soterrified of this getting worse, absolutely scared to death.  Thanks for your words ofencouragement and comfort.” (Personal Communication)“Suddenly some of the mysteriesof what's been called my "wheat intolerance"or "allergy" were resolved.  In particular, I no longer thinkI'm crazy for suspecting a link between my 2.5-year-long urinary tract infection and the onset of my moreobviously wheat-related symptoms. Thanks so much for getting theword out, and sharing your experience!” (Personal Communication) “I about fell off my chair when Iread about your bladder stuff.  I've seen 3 specialists (including adigestive doc and a urologist!!), a regular PCP, and a naturopath, andnone of them were willing to consider a link between wheat issues and my poorbladder's troubles. It was like the world lifted offmy shoulders - I'm not crazy!  And my body is not the wreck I thought itwas at the ripe old age of 31!Seems funny to be exultant aboutprobably having celiac disease, but that's whatI've been since.”

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/18/2011 - Once again, Halloween is around the corner and that means parents of children who must avoid gluten are wondering which candies, especially seasonal and Halloween candies, are safe for kids on a gluten–free diet?
    As awareness of celiac disease and gluten–free diets grows, more parents are demanding gluten–free products, and more manufacturers are responding with gluten–free products.
    Also, more candy makers are clearly marking their candies as gluten–free or containing wheat, gluten, etc. This gives parents and trick–or–treaters a wider range of choices.
    This makes it easier for parents to find gluten–free candies from reliable makers as close as the corner grocery store.
    But, with such a vast array of treats on parade for Halloween night, it can be a challenge to know which ones are safe.
    Below, we feature an updated list of gluten–friendly and gluten–free candies currently available.
    Below that we feature a list of unsafe, NON–gluten–free candies, as well as a partial list of manufacturers with links to their company websites.
    Remember, the list is just a guideline, and should not taken as authoritative or comprehensive. Before consuming any candy on the list, be sure to gauge your purchases according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.

    Gluten–Free  and Gluten-Safe Halloween Candy and Treats

    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate
    A
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead
    B
    Baby Ruth original and fun size
    Barrels of Candy
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls
    Bit•O•Honey
    Butterfinger original and fun size
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop and gum
    C
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew original and fun size
    Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Candy Carnival Package  – Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks – Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby
    Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    D
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix – jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story
    Dove pieces – Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum – may include milk or soy
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) –  no peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. Manufactured on dedicated equipment.
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops –  no peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. Manufactured on dedicated equipment.
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix - Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops
    Ferrara Pan Caramels - may contain milk or soy. Distributed in a facility where peanuts and tree nuts are used to make other products
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix – including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy* – reported issues
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts* – reported issues
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals* – reported issues
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size - does contain almonds
    Hershey’s Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate)
    Hershey’s Kisses (Candy Corn flavored candy, Caramel, Caramel Apple flavored filling, Milk Chocolate, Chocolate Meltaway, Pumpkin Spice, Hugs, Hugs & Kisses, Cherry Cordial Creme, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Special Dark)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bars and snack-size bars
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack-size bars
    Hot Tamales
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans – gluten–free, dairy–free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews
    Jr. Mints fun size – may contain eggs
    Jujifruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet ‘n’ Sour, and Scary Assortment
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's – except pretzel M&M's
    Mars Dove chocolate products
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini’s – may contain almonds
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine)
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Milk Duds
    Mike and Ike
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars –  made on equipment that processes almonds, in a facility that processes peanuts
    Mr. Goodbar – does contain peanuts
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses – does contain peanuts
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit–O–Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers – does contain peanuts
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets –  made on equipment that processes peanuts
    Nestle Sno–Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    Nik-L-Nip wax bottles with juice
    Now and Later
    O
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups – does contain peanuts
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy –  maple and roasted peanuts
    Pearson’s Mint Patties,
    Pearson’s Nut Goodies
    Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls
    Peeps Jack–o–lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats – “Gluten Free”
    Pez candy – “Gluten Free”
    Pop Rocks
    Pixie Stix
    R
    Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Razzles candy gum
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl’d Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun-size
    Smarties – the small pastel–colored candies sold in rolls, not Nestle’s chocolate version) – “Contains NO: gluten, milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy.
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews and fun-size
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts – “Gluten Free”
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Swedish Fish
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy
    T
    Tootsie Pops – original and mini
    Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Canpeasron's salted nut rolldy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix–Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix–Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys,
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix – SweetTart Chews OK, but other packages had a cross–contamination warning!
    X
    X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones
    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.

    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flourANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Reese's Minis
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers –  contains barley malt and wheat flour
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way –  contains barley malt
    Twix –  contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx  –  contains wheat flour
    Crunch –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Hundred Grand Bar –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free.
    RUSSELL STOVER'S  – Products have been produced on shared equipment with peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat.
    WONKA
    Sweetarts Gummy Bugs –  contains wheat/gluten
    Sweetarts Rope –  contains wheat/gluten
    Oompas
    Wonka Bar
    A more comprehensive list of unsafe candies for Halloween can be found at celiacfamily.com.
    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:
    Hershey's – 800–468–1714
    Jelly Belly – 800–522–3267
    Just Born – 888–645–3453
    Mars Chocolate – 800–627–7852
    Necco – 781–485–4800
    Nestle USA – 800–225–2270
    Pearson's – 800–328–6507
    Tootsie Roll – 773–838–3400
    Other resources:
    About.com
    DivineCaroline.com
    Surefoodliving.com


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/02/2013 - There really hasn't been too much research into gluten levels of products labeled and sold as 'gluten-free in the U.S. A team of researchers recently set out to try to get an idea of gluten levels in food being labeled and sold as 'gluten-free.'
    The good news is that that vast majority of gluten-free foods sampled in their small study were, in fact, gluten-free, and many registered detectable gluten levels far below the 20 ppm allowed by law.
    The research team tested three different samples of 112 separate products, for a total of 336 packages tested. They tested each sample twice, for a total of 672 extractions.
    Of the 112 products tested, 36 products (32%) were certified gluten-free by either the Gluten Free Certification Organization (32 products) or the Celiac Sprue Association (4 products). Only four products (i.e., bread, hot cereal, tortilla, cookie) from three manufacturers tested at or above 20 ppm gluten. Three of these products were not certified gluten-free; one product was certified gluten-free.
    While 9.4% of extractions contained quantifiable gluten, the vast majority of manufacturers are in compliance with the Food and Drug Administration’s gluten-free labeling rule.
    Overall, 97.5 percent of extractions tested below 20 ppm gluten. Of the extractions in compliance, 93% tested below 5 ppm gluten, which is the lower limit of quantification for the assay used.
    Based on the findings of this evaluation, many manufacturers are currently producing food that tests below the 20ppm threshold level of gluten that is currently allowed by the FDA.
    Gluten-free consumers can take comfort in the knowledge that the vast majority of manufacturers who are designating food as gluten-free are complying with the FDA’s labeling rule.
    Source:
    www.medicine.virginia.edu

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/20/2015 - Mexican food and tacos are one of my most consistent gluten-free food options. If I'm on the road, or pressed for time, sometimes fast food chains are the only option.
    But not all Mexican fast food chains are created equal when it comes to gluten-free options. Some do a good job, others do not.
    So here is a list of Mexican fast food chains that do a good job with gluten-free food options. As always, your individual experience at any of these restaurants may vary, so observe, ask questions about any item you're not sure about, and gauge your comfort level accordingly.
    If you have feedback, or know of any other Mexican fast food chains that offer good gluten-free food options, be sure to tell us in the comments below.
    Best Mexican Fast Food Chains:
    #1: Chipotle
    Chipotle gets high marks for gluten-free options. Pretty much everything that is not served with a flour tortilla is gluten-free.
    So, at Chiptole, that means all soft and hard corn taco shells, all meats, beans, vegetables and sides are gluten-free.
    #2: El Pollo Loco
    El Pollo Loco is another chain where you can get a good, healthy meal without thinking too hard about gluten.
    El Pollo Loco gluten-free menu includes their flame grilled Mexican chicken, corn tortillas, pinto beans, refried beans, avocado salsa, Cotija Cheese, mixed vegetables, and flan.
    Basically, avoid any flour tortillas, and you can easily eat gluten-free at El Pollo Loco.
    #3: Jimboy's Tacos
    Jimboy's has long been a favorite of mine, because they prepare all their food fresh from scratch and offer a pretty robust gluten-free menu that includes Jimboy's original tacos, including bean, ground beef, chicken, steak, and carnitas, Tacoburgers, Taquitos in both ground beef, and chicken, Tostadas, including bean, ground beef, chicken, and steak, Ground Beef Kid's Taco, Ground Beef Pepper Poppers, and Jimboy's Guacamole & Sour Cream.
    #4: Baja Fresh
    Baja Fresh offers a pretty good range of options for gluten-free eaters. Gluten-free options include Baja Tacos made with corn tortillas, any “Bare style” burrito, and any Baja Ensalada with choice of steak, chicken, or grilled shrimp, as well as grilled vegetables, carnitas, rice, and both varieties of beans.
    All Baja Fresh dressings and salsas are gluten-free.
    #5: Qdoba
    Qdoba is another fast Mexican food chain that offers a solid eating experience for gluten-free diners. Qdoba's gluten-free menu options include all Chicken, Chorizo, Flat Iron Steak, Ground Sirloin, Pork, and Seasoned Shredded Beef.
    Also gluten-free are their Soft White Corn Tortilla, Cilantro Lime Rice, Black Beans, Tortilla Soup, all Salsas and Dressings, 3 Cheese Queso and Guacamole.
    #6 Taco Cabana
    I had the good fortune of trying Taco Cabana on a trip to Albuquerque a while back. I was not disappointed.
    Taco Cabana does gluten-free eaters right with a wide variety of gluten-free options, including their Black, Borracho, and Refried beans, their Barbacoa, Chicken Fajita Meat, Rotisserie Chicken, Shredded Chicken Taco Meat in their Crispy Tacos, Chorizo, Chalupas or Nachos Steak Fajita Meat, Ground Beef Taco Meat (Crispy Tacos, Chalupas or Nachos), and Street Tacos in both Chicken & Steak.
    As with most places on this list, diners can substitute corn tortillas for flour tortillas in all tacos, fajitas, & plates.
    Other gluten-free options include Guacamole, Hash Brown Potatoes, Pico de Gallo, Rice, and Salsas – Fuego, Roja, Verde, Ranch, and Sour Cream.
    #7: Mighty Taco
    Mighty Taco makes it easy on gluten-free eaters by offering any taco with a corns shell, and most anything else on their menu except flour tortillas.
    Mighty Taco's gluten-free menu includes: Mighty Taco with Seasoned Ground Beef or Chicken, Mighty Pack with Seasoned Ground Chicken, Refried Bean and Cheese, Meatless Mighty, Veggies and Cheese, Seasoned Ground Chicken, Seasoned Ground Beef, Fajita Chicken, Buffito Chicken, and the Taco Beef Salad, Mighty Chicken Salad, Chicken Fajita Salad, and the Chicken Buffito Salad.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au