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  • Tina Turbin
    Tina Turbin

    Is Your Child Sneaking Foods off the Gluten-Free Diet?

    Caption: Photo: CC--Sax

    Celiac.com 12/22/2014 - Is your child sneaking a bite here and there off his or her needed gluten-free diet? You should know not only for the health of your child but to also ensure there are no other issues you need to help address, such as an allergy to nuts or dairy which can cause other issues. As a parent we need to stay on top of things to get to the bottom of any “unresolved” issues in their little bodies. If your child has been diagnosed with celiac disease, it’s critical that he or she follows a diet 100% free of gluten. Alarmingly, according to Celiac.com, 43% of celiacs cheat on their gluten-free diet, and 13% cheat 20-40 times per year or more for various reasons.

    Photo: CC--SaxOne of the reasons children may cheat on their diet is because they don’t have substitutes for their favorite gluten-containing foods. Have a talk with your child about the gluten-containing meals, snacks, and desserts he or she craves and misses and make sure there are plenty of gluten-free versions of these foods available at all times, especially over the holidays.

    Another reason celiac children may cheat on their diet is because eating gluten doesn’t make them feel sick. It’s important to sit down with your celiac child and have a heart-to-heart talk about how even though your child doesn’t feel sick, gluten is still wreaking havoc on the villi of the intestines which in turn can lead to very serious health conditions such as infertility and gastrointestinal cancer. You may want to include your child’s doctor or nutritionist in this discussion.

    Lastly, get your child excited and proud to be gluten-free. Have your celiac child join a local celiac children’s group to stay motivated and feel “normal” and connected to others with the same dietary restrictions. Pick out special gluten-free recipes to make for dinner or dessert. Attend a gluten-free cooking class together. There are many ways to his or her celiac pride.

    Your child won’t be tempted to cheat when you make this recipe!

    Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

    This is the original Toll House recipe, halved because I don’t want to make so many cookies. These are really delicious!

    Ingredients:

    • A heaping 1 ¾ cup rice flour or gluten-free flour mix
    • ½ teaspoon xanthan gum
    • ½ teaspoon baking soda
    • ½ teaspoon salt
    • 1 stick shortening, Earth Balance, or butter
    • ½ cup brown sugar
    • ¼ cup white sugar
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla
    • 1 egg
    • ½ package gluten-free chocolate chips
    • Nuts (optional)

    Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 375F degrees. Mix sugars and shortening or butter until creamy.
    2. Beat in egg, then dry ingredients except chocolate chips and nuts, if using.
    3. Once smooth, add chips and nuts and roll into balls.
    4. Flatten slightly.
    5. Bake 8-10 minutes.
    6. Let cool on cookie sheets.
    7. Remove and eat or store in an airtight container.
    8. Enjoy!

     NOTE: You may replace the egg with egg replacer or applesauce to make them vegan.

    Resources:

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    I was diagnosed 25 years ago at age 40 and did NOT want to have to be gluten-free. I went 90 days almost gluten-free (didn't watch some small stuff) and my DR did a second colonoscopy. While still in my twilight sleep he showed me both videos of my intestines. The first was HORRIBLE, inflamed, red, black and blue and leisons. 90 days later was just a clear blue image! I told my Dr. that was the BEST thing he could have done for me! To see the rotten intestine vs the no longer infected in 90 days. I think of that frequently. Try it with your kids. They will be shocked.

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  • About Me

    Tina Turbin is a world-renowned Celiac advocate who researches, writes, and consults about the benefits of the gluten-free, paleo-ish, low carb and keto diets, and is a full time recipe developer and founder of PaleOmazing.com. Tina also founded and manages the popular website, GlutenFreeHelp.info, voted the #2 .info website in the world. Tina believes that celiacs need to be educated to be able to make informed decisions and that Paleo needs to be tailored to the individual’s physiology to obtain desired results. You can reach her at: INFO@PaleOmazing.com.

  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 03/29/2010 - For many cultures, Easter represents the most important religious feast of the year. In biblical terms, it represents a celebration of Christ being resurrected. Yet, for those of us unable to digest gluten, it is yet another holiday reminding us of all the foods we can't eat.  Many of us that are gluten sensitive, myself included, spend so much time focused on the foods we can't eat, that it's easy to lose sight of all the wonderful foods still available to us. The fact is,  most of our favorite foods are still safe to eat with a little modification of course.
    Being gluten-free doesn't mean that you can't enjoy a holiday meal with your family and friends. If you are going to be a guest for the holiday, make sure your host knows about your food sensitivities, and understands how to accommodate your needs. If they can accommodate you-great! If not, make sure to bring your own gluten-free foods to be sure that you don't go hungry, and to avoid the temptation of eating something you might regret later. You may want to consider hosting Easter brunch at your house this year. Cooking the meal yourself assures that your meal will be gluten-free and eliminates the possibility of cross contamination.
    Whether you are making Easter brunch or Passover dinner, it's all supposed to be fun. That's why I put together a list of links that are all geared toward making it the best gluten-free Easter ever! The following links are a compilation of gluten-free recipes and prepared foods designed to make your holiday easy and fun. Some of the following links will take you out of  Celiac.com and into another site. You may want to bookmark this list so you can reference it easily as needed. Dig in and enjoy!
    Passover wouldn't be complete without matzoh. That's why the first recipe I've included is for gluten-free matzoh. The nice thing about the following matzoh recipe is that it's not only Kosher, it's also gluten, corn, sugar, dairy, and egg free! So even if you have many food restrictions, this is one recipe that is safe for almost everyone. Just add the matzoh to your favorite soup recipe, chicken or mock-chicken and you are ready to celebrate!
    Gluten-Free Matzoh Of course no Rosh Hashanah  is complete without Challah. The following recipe is gluten-free and has an option to be dairy-free as well.
    Gluten-Free Challah with a Dairy-Free Option Most meat in its pure form is gluten-free. However, during processing many meats are injected with gluten ingredients. The following links will help you determine which meats are gluten-free. Although, it is always a good idea to contact the manufacturer to verify that their meat is indeed gluten-free.
    Gluten-Free Turkeys Gluten-Free Hams The following are some  links  that will take you to easy and/or already prepared foods for Easter and Passover.
    Gluten-Free Breads:
    Gluten-Free Breads Gluten-Free Frozen Bread & Rolls Gluten-Free Baking Ingredients Gluten-Free Gravy:
     
    Easy Gluten-free Gravy Mixes Gluten-Free Desserts:
     
     
    Linzertorte Frozen Desserts Frozen Pies Easter Candy:
    It is so tempting to sample all of the yummy Easter candy out there, but don't forget that many Easter Candies are NOT gluten-free. During Passover and Easter, there are so many opportunities to go to parties with friends and family where there is a plethora of Easter snacks and candy; even office events will put your sweet tooth to the test. I recommend avoiding the temptation to sample Easter candy that may contain gluten, by bringing your own gluten-free candy to social events. Bringing gluten-free Easter candy to share with others will make it easier on you when it comes to sampling, because you can sample the candy you brought while also sharing with others. Informing your friends of your gluten-free candy requirements is also an option, it  might even make a good  conversation topic. The following is a list of gluten-free Easter candy. Please remember to check with the manufacturer if you have any questions.
     
     
    Gluten-free Candy Easter Candy Safe/Unsafe List As a newbie to the gluten-free community, I also have many other dietary restrictions. That's why finding gluten-free food is only half the battle for me. I also need to find food that fits all my other dietary requirements. Here is a site that I came across while looking for gluten-free, vegan recipes. These recipes all sound really amazing and I can't wait to try as many as possible! I must emphasize however, that I could not possibly try all of these recipes. So it is up to you to try the recipes that sound good to you and decide for yourself if you like them or not. I know first-hand how frustrating it is to spend time and money trying out a new, yummy sounding recipe, only to follow the recipe exactly as it is written, and discover that it tastes so bad I end up going to bed hungry. Rather than going to bed hungry, I recommend trying a few recipes before your holiday meal as a trial run. If you try a recipe before your holiday event, you will  have an opportunity to decide if you like the recipe and to modify the recipe to fit your taste buds if necessary.
     
     
    Destiny's Gluten-Free/Vegetarian/Vegan/Other Dietary Alternatives  
    Gluten-Free Easter Eggs:

    The following recipe is great for those with dye sensitivities or anyone looking for a natural, healthy alternative to Easter egg dyes. Most Easter coloring kits require vinegar. Be sure to use gluten-free vinegar.
     
    Gluten-Free Vinegar Natural/Food Based Dyes:
    Red and Pink- pomegranate juice, raspberries, cherries, cranberries, red grape juice, and beets, red onions. (less boiling or dying produces a pink color)
    Orange – carrots, chili powder or paprika
    Yellow – turmeric, orange or lemon peels, chamomile tea, celery seed (turmeric does not need to be boiled.)
    Brown – coffee, black tea or black walnut shells
    Green – spinach or liquid chlorophyll
    Blue – blueberries, purple grape juice
    Purple – grape juice or blackberries, concentrated grape juice, violet blossoms, and hibiscus tea
    Gold - curry powder, yellow delicious apple peels, dill seeds
    Deep yellow- soak eggs in turmeric for a long time
    Teal- Soak eggs in turmeric solution for 30 minutes and then cabbage soak for 5 seconds.
    Bright Blue- Soak eggs in cabbage solution overnight (or just for a long time)
    Red/Pink-less boiling or dying produces a pink color

    Instructions:
    To begin, boil your eggs and when they are cool, store them in your refrigerator until you are ready to dye them. Alternatively, you can boil eggs with dye or cold dip, for 5 seconds up to overnight, and dry on wire wrap.
    To make each dye, bring water, vinegar, and color element to a boil, lower the heat, simmer 30 min and strain dye. Please note, you will need a separate base for each primary dye color you make.
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    Caution: Food safety experts recommend not eating eggs that have been sitting at room temperature for more than two hours.
    Gluten-Free Quick-Check:
    Watch out for hidden gluten-ingredients,(caramel color, natural and artificial flavors or colors, etc) Keep your hands clean Host Easter brunch Make sure all of your kitchen equipment is clean and free of gluten contaminates Bring gluten-free Easter candy & snacks to share If you buy prepared meats, check with the manufacturer to make sure they are gluten-free Trust yourself. If you think something might make you sick, don't take any chances Above all else, have fun!
     
     
     
     

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 04/15/2010 - Mother's day is right around the corner, and what better way to tell your mom you love her, than to make her  a lovely gluten-free brunch. Even if your mom is a gluten eater, it is still a  perfect opportunity to try out some new gluten-free recipes. Many people with gluten sensitivities are also sensitive to foods other than gluten. That is why for this special day, I am including some gluten-free recipes that are also free of most common allergens.
    Making brunch for your mom on Mother's Day doesn't have to be expensive, and a gluten-free brunch isn't hard at all. If you have a recipe that you love, but you don't know how to make it gluten-free, do an Internet search for your favorite dish and add "gluten-free” to the beginning of your search. You will be amazed at how many recipes have already been converted to gluten-free, and are on the Internet to be shared by all.
    The following recipes are gluten-free, dairy/casein-free, egg-free, nut-free, corn free, and shell-fish free-actually free of all animal products. Even if you don't need to avoid other allergens, you might find that you like  these gluten free recipes better than you expect.  Although, the following recipes can also be modified to fit your taste buds. So if a recipe calls for non-dairy margarine for example, use butter, or coconut oil if you prefer. Don't hesitate to dig in and get creative!
    The following link is for a recipe that I can't wait to try. This basic recipe can be elaborated on, and you can top with the fruit of your choice. This is an excellent idea for brunch, or wrap them up and present them as a gift.

    Vegan Gluten Free Lemon Coconut Cream Scones  The wonderful thing about the following Tofu Benedict  recipe,  is that it can be modified to suit your taste buds. If you eat meat, you can add gluten-free meat to your Benedict, or anything that you think your mom would enjoy on her special day. It's also a very easy recipe and doesn't take long to prepare.
    Gluten-Free Tofu Benedict Recipe
    Ingredients:
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    In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, salt, and olive oil and pour the mixture over the tofu. Bake the tofu for 20 minutes, basting it occasionally and turning it over after 10 minutes. Pour off any excess liquid and bake the tofu for a few more minutes—until it is brown and crispy.
    To make the hollandaise sauce, melt the butter substitute  in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the nondairy sour cream, paprika, nutmeg, cayenne, and lemon juice. Make sure that the mixture is heated through but don’t allow it to boil.
    Top each English muffin half with a slice of tofu, tomato slice, and a generous spoonful of hollandaise sauce to taste.
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    Gluten-Free Gift Baskets
    Giving your mom a thoughtful Mother's Day gift doesn't have to be expensive. Gift baskets come in all shapes and sizes, so you don't have to spend a fortune to show your mom how much you love her.*Tip: To save money, make your own gluten-free gift basket. Purchase an inexpensive basket at your local craft store, fill it up with gluten-free goodies, wrap it with cellophane and a pretty bow and in no time, you have a customized gluten-free gift basket made especially for your mom.
    Fill your gluten-free gift basket up with gluten-free goodies; below are some ideas.

    Gluten-Free Desserts Gluten-Free Cookies Gluten-Free Crackers Gluten-Free Candy Gluten-Free Personal Care, Lotions etc. If your mom likes to cook, what better way to pamper her, than to give her the gift that keeps on giving. Below is a link of gluten-free cookbooks. Cookbooks also make a wonderful addition to your gift basket.
    Cookbooks Don't forget the chocolate! No gift basket is complete without chocolate and most moms enjoy a little chocolate on occasion. The following is a list of gluten-free chocolate treats. You will find everything from chocolate cakes and cookies, to chocolate mousse and chocolate chips. So even if you don't have time to bake her a cake, you can still give your mom some yummy gluten-free chocolate treats to enjoy on  Mother's Day.
    Gluten-Free Chocolate
    Keep your mom in style this Spring. Our celiac awareness shirts are a welcome addition to any gift basket or even by themselves.
    Celiac Awareness Shirts
    What do you get for the gluten-free mom that has everything? Try a giftvoucher for the Gluten Free Mall. Vouchers can accommodate any budgetand they also make an excellent last minute gift. So this year, thereis no excuse for not giving your mom something nice for  Mother's Day.
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    Mother's Day Ideas:
    Make gluten-free brunch Convert your favorite recipes to “gluten-free” Make your mom a gluten-free gift basket Happy Mother's Day!


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/23/2012 - Most parents of gluten-free children can attest to the challenges of making certain that the food the kids are eating is, in fact, gluten-free.
    Many of those parents can also be comforted by the fact that more public schools are recognizing the need for gluten-free lunches for certain children, and are making an effort to provide nutritious gluten-free alternatives for those children.
    Well, in a development that may interest all parents of gluten-free children, the BBC is reporting that schools in Northamptonshire, UK, have been to ordered to discontinue two particular "gluten-free" meals after the meals were found to contain unacceptable levels of gluten. Gluten from wheat, rye or barley triggers an immune reaction in certain people, requiring them to avoid eating food containing even trace amounts of those grains.
    Nutritionists overseeing the gluten-free meals discovered gluten in a supplier's shepherd's pie and beef Bolognese. These meals are served to gluten-free children at schools across the county.
    The BBC report says the county council has about 20 pupils registered with gluten-intolerance or celiac disease, but that no children had shown an adverse reaction.
    Unacceptably high levels of gluten were detected in a gravy powder used to make the two meals, according to the local authority contacted by the BBC.
    The report cites Councilor Andrew Grant as saying that nutritionists regularly monitor the ingredients used by companies that supply food to the schools, and that one such check found that food labeled as gluten-free in fact continued gluten.
    In many gluten-sensitive individuals, even a small amount of gluten can trigger an adverse reaction. So, even if the even if the contamination is slight, Grants notes, it is nevertheless completely unacceptable for a child with allergies to be exposed to this risk.
    According to the article, county officials wants to make certain that the problem is confined to these two particular products, so it has asked for a full investigation into the cause of the problem. 
    Are problems such as this to be expected as we transition gluten-free food into new areas, such as public schools? Are even these problems a sign that celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity awareness is increasing? Are such issues a sign that more and better gluten-free food options lie just around the corner? Let us know your thoughts.


    Robert Lanterman
    Celiac.com 10/29/2014 - At the age of eighteen I started to see a naturopath in order to find ways to combat my anxiety without switching to a bunch of shady medications. In my experience, people had rarely ever talked about food intolerances in relation to neurochemistry. Despite my skepticism or the skepticism of the people around me, what choice did I have but to try whatever it took? My anxiety levels were unmanageable, and I found myself ruining a lot of my relationships because I was too afraid of all the possible outcomes to make decisive choices in the majority of social situations, which led to me letting a lot of people down when they were counting on me. I had to find a way to gain some self-control, and I had reached a place in life where counseling wasn’t enough anymore.
    This naturopath, actually recommended by my counselor, suggested I take a blood test, which upon receiving the results showed that I had several chemical imbalances that were made worse by different kinds of food I was eating. This was a completely new concept to me. Of course as crazy as the concept was, it scientifically held up with the blood test. My parents and I were willing to do what it took to fix my chemical levels and make my anxiety more manageable without getting me too doped up. That said, two of the things I completely cut out of my diet from then on were gluten and dairy, as eating them negatively affected my chemical balances more so than most other foods did. Now, going gluten-free is hard. But taking dairy away with it felt extremely limiting at first as it required almost a complete 180 in my diet. After all, gluten and dairy were a part of just about every meal I had eaten up to that point, and I’m sure most of you readers can relate. Regardless, doing it made me feel better physically - I was no longer exhausted all of the time, I was having healthier bowel movements, and my anxiety levels decreased greatly. People commonly ask me, “what do you even eat?” and you may be wondering the same thing. So here are five awesome food brands that offer great gluten- and dairy-free options that I have thoroughly enjoyed over the years!
    Namaste - Namaste is a fairly small brand that has been growing over the past fourteen years that makes great-tasting food without wheat, gluten, corn, soy, potato, dairy, peanuts, or tree nuts. That’s right, they have your allergies basically covered. If I had to recommend anything from them, it would be their taco pasta dinner, made of brown rice pasta, which is probably my favorite gluten-free, dairy free food ever. Of course, they have a lot of other great products such as brownies, waffles & pancakes, and pizza crust. It’s a bit more expensive, as most foods with specialized purposes like this are, but if you can afford, you can’t go wrong with Namaste.
    So Delicious Dairy Free - “If you’re trying to keep dairy and gluten-free, are you ever in the right place” boasts So Delicious on their website. Most of the So Delicious products are made with alternate kinds of milk, such as almond milk, coconut milk, soy, cashew, etc. If you love ice cream and yogurt like I do, So Delicious is one of the best-tasting options you could try. They have a great list of common ingredients they use, with a description of each one that you can find here.
    Annie’s Gluten-free - This one you have to carefully navigate around, because some of their products do have milk and wheat ingredients. But if you do your research, Annie’s is one of the best sources for gluten/dairy free snacks available right now. For instance, go to their website and look for their vegan and gluten-free combination snacks! I’m a fan of their assortment of Bunny Grahams myself.
    Lucy’s Gluten-free Cookies - Not only are they gluten-free, but, like Namaste, Lucy’s have no peanuts or tree nuts. They are also all vegan, contain 0g of Trans Fat and 0mg of Cholesterol, are all natural and non-GMO. My mom would surprise me when I would visit her at home in my college years, and they would typically be gone within a couple of hours. I would recommend any of their products - they’re all very tasty!
    Food Should Taste Good - Oh man, this one’s a goodie. Primarily known for their popular Multigrain Chips, FSTG is a non-GMO committed chip company that specializes in no wheat and completely vegan products. Their multi-grain chips are delicious - I had a lot of friends eating mine who weren’t gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, or caring about GMOs. They are just that good. The best part about this is the different types of chips they have, not just the Multi-Grain. They’ve expanded to all different kinds of types and flavors. Some of these are tortilla made blue corn and sweet potato chips (which I’ve been known to partake in upon multiple occasions), kettle cooked barbeque flavored chips, a variety of brown rice crackers, and pesto flavored pita puffs.
    Despite what people say, going gluten- and dairy- free has a lot of great benefits in my opinion, and it’s great that people work hard to give us products like these that fit the diet but still taste delicious! I think that at least cutting back on gluten will have some great health benefits for most people, and some have argued that it can even help with athletics. If you’re interested, it’s something I would highly recommend looking into as I attribute part of who I am today - a college graduate working a full-time job and managing stress comparatively well - to these dietary changes I made four years ago.

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