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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    JAMIE'S ITALIAN PAYS $12,000 FINE FOR SERVING REGULAR PASTA TO CUSTOMER WITH CELIAC DISEASE


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 06/20/2013 - A restaurant owned by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver has been fined over $12,000 after a customer with celiac disease was sickened by eating regular pasta, instead of gluten-free pasta she was supposed to receive.


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    Photo: Wikicommons - Really Short.The fine resolves a complaint brought by 38-year-old Kristy Richardson, who dined in 2011 at Jamie's Italian in Porstmouth, U.K. Richardson suffers from celiac disease.

    According to reports in the Telegraph, Richardson asked three different staff members to make sure she received gluten-free pasta, but she somehow received regular pasta. As a result, she became "violently ill," with nausea and vomiting that lasted for days and which left her weak for months, according to news reports.

    This in itself might be bad enough for most people, but, at the time, Richardson was on a waiting list for a heart and lung transplant. According to reports in the Sun, her gluten-triggered illness was so severe that her doctors temporarily removed her from that list; potentially depriving her of a transplant opportunity.

    Richardson complained, authorities became involved, charges were filed, and the restaurant eventually pleaded guilty to "selling food not of the nature, substance or quality demanded by a purchaser," according to the Telegraph.

    The fine is in addition to the nearly $4,000 previously awarded to Richardson in a civil case over the matter. What do you think? Should restaurants be fined if their gluten-free food contains gluten. Does it matter whether it makes people sick?


    Image Caption: Photo: Wikicommons - Really Short.
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    Guest Kdolan

    Posted

    That is unbelievable. That is a HUGE screw up. Poor Kristy. Unfortunately that is why I stay home to eat, TRUST NO ONE.

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    Guest Debbie

    Posted

    I wish that restaurants didn't try to have a gluten free option. I would rather they were ignorant. Then I could educate when I went in. As it is everyone thinks they understand. Servers half listen and then communicate to the cook/chef who also half listen. Then I get sick. They do not understand the difference between diet and disease. A server actually said to me, "this gluten craze is absurd. it is all in people's heads" I gave the guy a big tip, a piece of my mind. I didn't eat there. I went back to asking for the manager again. This is still the best way to increase your chances of safe food. Sorry to this hear this happened at such a good restaurant. I think the server should be held accountable. Food safety starts with them.

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    This is a truly tragic case but I'm not sure you can eat out at a restaurant and completely be free of the risk of human error. I would hate to see a lot of law suits against restaurants for fear no one would serve gluten free food. However, the seriousness of celiac disease and gluten intolerance needs to be front and center in the food service industry. I think a bigger health risk for most celiacs is the small amount of gluten we are getting in processed foods due to cross contamination. I can't count the times I have reacted to a supposedly gluten free product.

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    Guest Kalpna

    Posted

    Absolutely, they should be fined. This is not a frivolous matter... she checked, she got sick, this affected her transplant potential.

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    Guest Penny

    Posted

    If a restaurant cannot guarantee their gluten-free menu items to be completely gluten-free, they shouldn't offer them! I think fining the restaurants can be a way to drive home the importance, and seriousness of the issue!

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    Guest Tonia

    Posted

    Gluten and dairy and sulfur free - I suffer analphalaxis when I eat sulfur - only takes a couple of restaurants to get it wrong (and they have) before you start to go INTO the kitchen, talk to the chef and tell him/her that I will DIE if they mess up - I am 49 years old - and have lived successfully with this for over 20 years - people are really good when they know its life or death - so make sure that they 'get how serious it is! (take my own food everywhere anyway... never travel without gluten free solutions (message me if you want some awesome pointers)

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    Guest mary edwards

    Posted

    This is a good eye opener. How about some easy ways to tell if the pasta is gluten-free? On the menu, inform the consumer: all of our gluten-free pasta is infused with spinach to give it a distinct green tone. If you are served pasta that isn't this color, please let your server know. Something like that could help. When it all looks alike, it's difficult for everyone.

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    The fines were minimal and would hardly make a dent in the restaurant's profits. The adverse publicity, on the other hand, could have a huge impact. I think this should be a headline story because it's actually a case of deliberate poisoning/physical abuse. TV journalists/Newspaper Editors -- are you listening?!

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    Personally, I think this is horrible. As a person who cannot have gluten or casein, I fully understand that by eating out I am taking a ris . Always. If she was in such precarious health that being 'glutened' in a restaurant (their mistake or not) could cause her such harm, why take that risk? She isn't to blame for this mistake, of course, but it is unreasonable, imo, for all restaurants to now fear serving any gluten-free food to their clientele. Seems like a step backwards, not forwards for the gluten-free community.

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    I have to agree with Sue: there is always a risk. Even eating regular food, you never know if you'll come home with a case of food poisoning (gluten-free related or not). I was once accidentally served regular pizza when I ordered gluten-free pizza. It was OBVIOUS there was something wrong with my pizza - way too puffy. They let us keep it and brought me the correct one (nice and flat). Visually, gluten-free pasta looks different too. I think both are at fault, she should have perhaps, as mentioned, talked directly to the chef and realized there IS a difference between regular pasta and gluten-free pasta - visually. But also, the restaurant needs to educate the staff better. I would hate to also see start turning into a some sue happy situation. It only takes one before others start jumping on the band wagon for the same reason.

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    Guest Maria

    Posted

    Restaurants should not try and serve "gluten-free" food! I never eat out because the staff never takes me seriously and most of the time I end up sick! Unfortunately, the managers don't really care.

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    Guest ceecee

    Posted

    This is a good eye opener. How about some easy ways to tell if the pasta is gluten-free? On the menu, inform the consumer: all of our gluten-free pasta is infused with spinach to give it a distinct green tone. If you are served pasta that isn't this color, please let your server know. Something like that could help. When it all looks alike, it's difficult for everyone.

    I love that idea! I hate being the "picky customer," so I feel like I am insulting the staff by asking "are you sure it's ___-free?" I worked in a restaurant long before I knew that I had any issues with food, and I've been that employee who thinks "wow, what an annoying customer."

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    Guest Karla Maree

    Posted

    In Kentucky, where I visit from time to time, they take food allergies very seriously. When you request a gluten-free meal, they bring out a binder of all potential food allergies by category, so if you have a gluten or dairy or nut allergy, you can see exactly what you can eat. The food is cooked in separate ovens, or using dedicated equipment, and so on, and the manager bring the food out personally. For me it is a 3-day migraine for even a touch of gluten. I empathize entirely with this poor woman's plight.

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    Guest Cheryl

    Posted

    If you are in food service, you should be trained in food allergens and food safety, there is no excuse for that huge mistake, the same thing happened to my husband. He was served wheat pasta instead of gluten-free. I think this is a positive step for all who have diseases like celiac or food allergies. EVERYONE, should feel safe eating out. I think she should have gotten more money, $12K wasn't enough for that pain and suffering.

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    Restaurants should not try and serve "gluten-free" food! I never eat out because the staff never takes me seriously and most of the time I end up sick! Unfortunately, the managers don't really care.

    I also rarely eat out when I'm at home, but my career involves lots of travel, so I and everyone else in my situation really don't have a choice about eating in restaurants. I'm only in favor of fines if they willfully misrepresent the food or screw up so badly, as they did here, that their competence is in question.

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    Guest Niraj

    Posted

    This problem is linked to being gluten-free becoming a health fad. We therefore need to promote the concept of celiac friendly in addition to gluten-free.

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    Guest Ailyshah

    Posted

    I've had a similar experience at a restaurant where the waiter said, "this gluten/celiac thing is the latest rave" AFTER I took my food back and showed him the roll that was on top of the food. They need to get heavily fined along with major training on cross contamination!

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    Guest nursemar

    Posted

    Would the general consumer response been different if the customer was allergic to nuts, served nuts in a food product even after making the staff aware of the allergy, had an anaphylactic reaction, couldn't breathe and died?! It's a big risk for those with celiac disease when eating out and more education is needed. But if the restaurant doesn't understand it they shouldn't try to serve gluten free.

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    Guest Suzanne

    Posted

    This is a very serious issue, but I don't want to see lawsuits become a way of life over it either. Most of the general public understand a "peanut allergy" or "bee sting allergy"... Perhaps if you liken celiac to those it'll get the point across. However I still find it easier to avoid restaurants.

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    This is such an unfortunate case. I agree about the worry this will cause for other eating establishments - that they will decide it's not worth offering gluten-free options. I applaud restaurants for trying to offer a gluten-free menu. I sincerely hope the urging to "not serve" gluten-free food is not considered. People with celiac disease and other diseases need/and should be able to go out into the world, interact socially and enjoy food at a restaurant. Care/training/education should be required for all staff who serve, handle and prepare food.

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    Guest Christine J.

    Posted

    I firmly believe the restaurant should have been charged a fine for not serving specifically what the client ordered, especially when she took such pains to ensure she was delivered the correct pasta. I have learned to ask whether or not there is wheat or barley malt in foods - then if the server is savvy, they get that it needs to be gluten-free. Many people do not understand what gluten is, so I make sure to put it in terms they do understand. I also make sure that the sauces that food is served with doesn't have any hidden wheat (such as soy sauce used to make BBQ sauce or steak sauce) or just request it dry. We tend to migrate toward restaurants that have gluten-free menus and avoid the rest. It's not worth the hassle.

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    This is very tragic. It is an awful case of the extreme. We deal with the fear of eating out too - however, we appreciate restaurants that offer a gluten-free menu and would hate to see this case set the wheels in motion for retracting gluten-free menus. This disease is so difficult socially. What we need is more training and education for each and every person in the food service industry so they know how serious it is. People are being diagnosed more accurately than in the past, the numbers are growing - with allergies and Celiac Disease. They are not going to go away. Restaurants will have to learn to meet those growing needs. PLEASE DON'T STOP TRYING!!!!

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    Gluten and dairy and sulfur free - I suffer analphalaxis when I eat sulfur - only takes a couple of restaurants to get it wrong (and they have) before you start to go INTO the kitchen, talk to the chef and tell him/her that I will DIE if they mess up - I am 49 years old - and have lived successfully with this for over 20 years - people are really good when they know its life or death - so make sure that they 'get how serious it is! (take my own food everywhere anyway... never travel without gluten free solutions (message me if you want some awesome pointers)

    Tonia, I'd love to see your pointers for travel. Do they actually let you in the kitchen? My last vacation we had a kitchen and I made my own meals. However, I did go to a conference at an upscale hotel recently and they assured me that it is standard protocol there to use separate utensils for all allergens (plus one of the chefs is gluten intolerant). I took a chance and did not get sick!

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    Guest Sheila

    Posted

    This is what we do- when placing the order, I explain about severe gluten allergy, I look at the server's name tag, use it while saying: if my husband ends up sick and in the hospital, you Susie, will be included in the law suit. So please let the cooks know that this is a severe food allergy and not a preference." Since I started that, we have never been sick. Of course, we rarely eat out and when we do, we go to the two restaurants that are "safe."

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    Guest Barbara

    Posted

    I feel she should have been awarded more, especially considering how sick she was to begin with. I just "know" that I get contaminated when eating out unless I have just a salad. I'm so tired of hearing "Oh, you have a gluten allergy?" I used to explain that's its not an allergy, but now I say "yes, so please ask the chef to be extra careful." I think they are more concerned when they hear that a customer is allergic to something. It seems to carry more weight, so to speak, because they don't know much about celiac disease. But they do know with allergies, it can be life threatening.

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    Paul Smith
    Celiac.com 12/14/2009 - Soy is a food allergen and there are several main issues. Firstly, soy proteins, especially the trypsin inhibitor enzymes, along with the proteins in dairy products, wheat, peanuts, eggs, sesame seeds, shellfish and crustaceans, have a tendency to produce allergic reactions in susceptible individuals. However, all my reading and experience of soy, over 50 years, suggests that soy protein is somewhat milder in its action than the proteins in peanuts, eggs and sesame seeds. From a toxicological point of view and as reported by FSANZ, the presence of soy at less than 88 p.p.m. (parts per million) does not register for the vast majority of the population, whereas in susceptible individuals and by comparison, gluten, eggs and peanuts can all register adversely at or at less than 1 - 3 p.p.m. There is no history of severe anaphylaxis and sudden death associated with soy that I am aware of. However, there are a very few people who may experience flu and chronic fatigue and fuzzy headedness like symptoms from exposure to soy and these people are probably best to totally exclude soy from their diets. There are also some people who have a negative attitude towards soy who decline to eat soy, often without ever having tasted it or in response to a single bad experience. For many people brought up on cow’s milk soy is a difficult to acquire taste. Most people eat soy without any awareness of having done so.
    It is my belief that for most people a modest level of soy intake, including its protein provides a valuable addition to the diet without undue side effects. There are many people who tolerate soy, who experience difficulties with gluten, dairy, peanut and egg proteins, especially if the soy is introduced into their diets gradually. In commercial food production, soy protein is often used at fairly low levels as a dairy powder, cheese, egg and nut extender/substitute, for price, functionality, natural preservative/anti-oxidant/emulsification properties, natural colour and for nutrition reasons.
    Secondly, soy and other legumes contain natural oligosaccharides or complex sugars – principally stachyose, raffinose and vacchyose which consist of various combinations of galactose and glucose molecules – which human beings lack the enzymes to digest. These sugars ferment in the gut, rather than digest, producing gas, flatulence, stomach pains, bloating, diarrhoea and sometimes acute discomfort especially if the fermentation process occurs in the more restricted upper digestive tract. This is often crudely referred to as the “fart factor” and it is often far worse when there has been a rapid change of diet or an overly large amount consumed. There is also some evidence that fructose mal-absorption, for example, can lead to depression and interfere in menstrual cycles in young women. I believe this sugar factor in Soy may be of greater concern than the soy protein issue and one best considered within the FODMAPS (Fermentable Oligosaccharides (fructans, stachyose, raffinose), Disaccharides (lactose), Mono-saccharides (fructose), and Polyols (sorbitol, mannitol and xylitol)) Concept explored in Sue Shepherd’s recent PhD Thesis. Sue, who is both a celiac and a dietician, has taken a strong interest in this field because, along with diabetes, the fermentable sugars issue often overlaps and is associated with gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. These fermentation issues can appear in conjunction with or independently of any gluten issues. The gluten induced gut damage and nutrient mal-absorption exacerbating and feeding off the fermentation issue and vice versa. As with the reaction to gluten there is a wide range of sensitivity and responses to and between these different sugars with some people reacting adversely to all these sugars while others react to some and not others. The degree of and cumulative effects of exposure are also an issue. The response can also depend upon where in the gut the fermentation process occurs: there appears to be more pain if the fermentation occurs in the stomach or the small bowel rather than the colon. The fermentation may occur in one part of the gut, in all three parts or various combinations thereof. There is also some conjecture about the gut-brain axis over sending and misinterpreting the gut nerve signals. While Soy also contains a small percentage of fructose there is not sufficient present for this to become an issue. The fructose content of such staples as onions and garlic, for example, is of far more concern.
    Interestingly, neither the protein nor fermentable oligosaccharides appear to be an issue in tofu consumption, where only some of the protein and sugars are extracted from the soy. The fermentation processes used in the manufacture of miso and tempeh, two other traditional soy foods, also seem to overcome the soy protein and fermentable oligosaccharide issues. It appears that the protein and sugar hydrolysis processes that take place in the fermentation that occurs during the manufacture of these products breaks the proteins and sugars down to simpler, more digestible and assimilable forms making these foods easier to digest than, for example, a more minimally processed soy flour. It is also possible and may be desirable to look at fermentable sugar extraction or modification or enzyme or acid hydrolysis during the processing of many ingredients and products.
    The third issue with soy is the concentration of the naturally occurring soy phyto-estrogens or isoflavones (plant derived mimic female hormones) which may occur, particularly in the processing of soy isolates where the oil is extracted prior to precipitation of the protein and the skimming off of the carbohydrate/dietary fibre fraction. This produces a product with protein at 86%, moisture at 6% with low ash, fat, dietary fibre and carbohydrate levels where sometimes the isoflavones or phyto-estrogens are also extracted and sometimes not. Where soy isolates are being considered as the base for an infant formula it is extremely important to limit the intake of the phyto-estrogen or plant derived hormone to the absolute minimum. It is also important to note that dairy derived infant formulas also need to be highly modified to make them suitable for human babies.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/15/2010 - Just five simple questions can help you determine if your child needs a gluten-free diet, according to the a recent Danish study that aims to improve celiac disease diagnosis in children.
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    A simple blood test can tell doctors which kids most likely have celiac disease. But doing a blood test on every child is simply not practical. Would it be better to test just the kids who show one or more symptoms common to celiac disease?
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    Pediatrics, March 2010


    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Recently I have noticed a trend in articles that demonize the gluten-free diet, and imply that there is something unhealthy or even dangerous about it. Here is an example of one that I forwarded to Dr. Ron Hoggan:
    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11017/1118230-114.stm
    and below is his response to its author:
    Dear China Millman,
    Thank you for your interesting article on gluten-free dieting.  I was very pleased to read that you include patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity among those who should follow a gluten free diet.  I assume that you have arrived at your estimate of 20 million who are afflicted with wheat allergy, non-celiac and celiac gluten sensitivity using Dr. Fasano’s  estimate that 6 to 7 percent of Americans have what you refer to as this “milder form of gluten intolerance”.  There are other estimates. For instance, Dr. Kenneth Fine did random blood draws at a shopping center in Dallas, Texas and found an 11% rate of gluten sensitivity. Congruently, Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou has reported rates as high as 12% in the United Kingdom and Dr. Rodney Ford reports a prevalence estimate of 10% in New Zealand.  Each investigator used different methods to arrive at their estimate, and each method is likely to underestimate the true prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. For instance, they all rely on a single class of antibody reaction against a single sub-group of proteins found in gluten grains. Thus, Dr. Fasano’s estimate may be unduly conservative as it is substantially lower than others have found in similar populations and the testing used to arrive at Dr. Fasano's estimate also carries all of the other limitations mentioned above.
    As for the notion that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is milder than celiac disease, Anderson et al, in their study titled “Malignancy and mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with coeliac disease or ‘gluten sensitivity’ World J Gastroenterol 2007 January 7; 13(1): 146-151, report a higher rate of malignancy and early mortality among those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity than among those with celiac disease.  This finding may be the result of the common recommendation that patients ignore test results that show non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as many physicians believe that such results are “non-specific” and do not warrant a gluten free diet. However, it may also reflect that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a more serious illness than celiac disease. It may also reflect something entirely different than these two interpretations, but it does make a very good case for the need for more research in this very neglected area.
    As for the comments by Heather Mangieri and the American Dietetics Association, they might benefit from reading studies such as the one by Dr. Cheng et al titled “Body Mass Index in Celiac Disease Beneficial Effect of a Gluten-free Diet” in the 2009 Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. They found that, after diagnosis with celiac disease, about half of the overweight and obese patients lost weight. Given the conservative data you report, suggesting that at least 90% of American cases of celiac disease go undiagnosed, there can be little doubt that a large portion of those with undiagnosed celiac disease who are overweight or obese would be likely to lose weight. The number who would lose weight should be greater among those who chose to follow a gluten free diet to lose weight, as some of those who are diagnosed with celiac disease do not comply with the diet.  If one accepts the proposition that those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, IBS, and IBD often have similarly problematic reactions to gluten, the number of Americans who could lose weight and live healthier, and therefore happier, lives (eating a gluten free diet) rises exponentially.
    On a personal level, my mother lost 66 pounds during her first years on a gluten free diet. Now, some 15 years later, she has lost almost 100 pounds. I doubt that she would still be alive had she not undertaken the gluten free diet purely on the basis of test results suggestive of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  
    In the current context of excessive under-diagnosis of celiac disease and limited understandings of the dynamics by which a gluten free diet causes weight loss among celiac patients, and an enormously greater number of Americans who have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, it is difficult to understand why anyone would be cautioned against following a gluten free diet with weight loss as their objective.  Whether these individuals are undiagnosed celiac patients, have undiagnosed non-celiac gluten sensitivity, or they find that a gluten free diet is helping them to achieve their body mass objectives, there is little legitimate cause to "warn" people away from a gluten free diet. Overall, your article does raise awareness of gluten as a potential health threat, so its overall impact is positive despite the misinformation that a gluten free diet does not help with weight loss.
    Sincerely,
    Ron Hoggan, Ed. D.
    Royal Roads University, Continuing Studies

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/20/2015 - Mexican food and tacos are one of my most consistent gluten-free food options. If I'm on the road, or pressed for time, sometimes fast food chains are the only option.
    But not all Mexican fast food chains are created equal when it comes to gluten-free options. Some do a good job, others do not.
    So here is a list of Mexican fast food chains that do a good job with gluten-free food options. As always, your individual experience at any of these restaurants may vary, so observe, ask questions about any item you're not sure about, and gauge your comfort level accordingly.
    If you have feedback, or know of any other Mexican fast food chains that offer good gluten-free food options, be sure to tell us in the comments below.
    Best Mexican Fast Food Chains:
    #1: Chipotle
    Chipotle gets high marks for gluten-free options. Pretty much everything that is not served with a flour tortilla is gluten-free.
    So, at Chiptole, that means all soft and hard corn taco shells, all meats, beans, vegetables and sides are gluten-free.
    #2: El Pollo Loco
    El Pollo Loco is another chain where you can get a good, healthy meal without thinking too hard about gluten.
    El Pollo Loco gluten-free menu includes their flame grilled Mexican chicken, corn tortillas, pinto beans, refried beans, avocado salsa, Cotija Cheese, mixed vegetables, and flan.
    Basically, avoid any flour tortillas, and you can easily eat gluten-free at El Pollo Loco.
    #3: Jimboy's Tacos
    Jimboy's has long been a favorite of mine, because they prepare all their food fresh from scratch and offer a pretty robust gluten-free menu that includes Jimboy's original tacos, including bean, ground beef, chicken, steak, and carnitas, Tacoburgers, Taquitos in both ground beef, and chicken, Tostadas, including bean, ground beef, chicken, and steak, Ground Beef Kid's Taco, Ground Beef Pepper Poppers, and Jimboy's Guacamole & Sour Cream.
    #4: Baja Fresh
    Baja Fresh offers a pretty good range of options for gluten-free eaters. Gluten-free options include Baja Tacos made with corn tortillas, any “Bare style” burrito, and any Baja Ensalada with choice of steak, chicken, or grilled shrimp, as well as grilled vegetables, carnitas, rice, and both varieties of beans.
    All Baja Fresh dressings and salsas are gluten-free.
    #5: Qdoba
    Qdoba is another fast Mexican food chain that offers a solid eating experience for gluten-free diners. Qdoba's gluten-free menu options include all Chicken, Chorizo, Flat Iron Steak, Ground Sirloin, Pork, and Seasoned Shredded Beef.
    Also gluten-free are their Soft White Corn Tortilla, Cilantro Lime Rice, Black Beans, Tortilla Soup, all Salsas and Dressings, 3 Cheese Queso and Guacamole.
    #6 Taco Cabana
    I had the good fortune of trying Taco Cabana on a trip to Albuquerque a while back. I was not disappointed.
    Taco Cabana does gluten-free eaters right with a wide variety of gluten-free options, including their Black, Borracho, and Refried beans, their Barbacoa, Chicken Fajita Meat, Rotisserie Chicken, Shredded Chicken Taco Meat in their Crispy Tacos, Chorizo, Chalupas or Nachos Steak Fajita Meat, Ground Beef Taco Meat (Crispy Tacos, Chalupas or Nachos), and Street Tacos in both Chicken & Steak.
    As with most places on this list, diners can substitute corn tortillas for flour tortillas in all tacos, fajitas, & plates.
    Other gluten-free options include Guacamole, Hash Brown Potatoes, Pico de Gallo, Rice, and Salsas – Fuego, Roja, Verde, Ranch, and Sour Cream.
    #7: Mighty Taco
    Mighty Taco makes it easy on gluten-free eaters by offering any taco with a corns shell, and most anything else on their menu except flour tortillas.
    Mighty Taco's gluten-free menu includes: Mighty Taco with Seasoned Ground Beef or Chicken, Mighty Pack with Seasoned Ground Chicken, Refried Bean and Cheese, Meatless Mighty, Veggies and Cheese, Seasoned Ground Chicken, Seasoned Ground Beef, Fajita Chicken, Buffito Chicken, and the Taco Beef Salad, Mighty Chicken Salad, Chicken Fajita Salad, and the Chicken Buffito Salad.

  • Recent Articles

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center