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    Lengthen Your Telomeres and Live Longer?


    Miranda Jade
    Image Caption: Photo--CC--Eric_Kilby

    Celiac.com 07/27/2012 - In my work as a celiac advocate and researcher, I've promoted taking daily vitamin supplements for better health for quite some time, but now with a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition confirming this I am pushing it even more. 


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    Photo--CC--Eric_KilbyTelomeres are considered to be the "key" to anti-aging. As you age, your telomeres get shorter and shorter. Lengthening your telomeres will lead to a longer, healthier life. The study in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that multivitamin use can lengthen one's telomeres. This can be accomplished by specific vitamins such as B12, C and E due to the fact that they are antioxidants. This means they fight damaging effects of oxidant (radicals) and even can repair damage which already has been received by the cells. 

    It's important for one to take B12, C and E regularly and to also get these in your daily diet. Grass-fed beef, salmon, tuna and milk all contain B12. You can get your vitamin C from foods such as strawberries, grapefruit, green bell peppers, etc. Vitamin E is found in broccoli, almonds and many other sources.

    It's probably easier to just take a multivitamin, but be careful of ones containing iron. Iron has been shown to have a shortening effect on telomeres.  Just adding something as simple as a multivitamin can boost your life span and make you feel great!

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    The article would be better if it included a brief description of telomeres.

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    Guest Lissa

    Posted

    I've never heard of telomeres. The article doesn't address this.

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    Your genes are a double helix. At the base of that is a bit of nonsense that doesn't seem to do anything, but when the genes split because the cell is dividing, the telomere gets a little shorter. When it's too short, the cell can't divide anymore and you get aging. Protecting the telomeres extends life. There are lots of people working on this solution. Look at Singularity U.

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    Guest Diana

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    I am partnered with a company that has a natural option for telomerase activation. Clinicals are underway to prove this. Our products are friendly for celiacs as well. If you would like more information on this breakthrough product, please email me at DianaFrerick@aol.com.

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    As we age, our telomeres shorten. Scientific studies have shown that short telomeres are associated with age-related decline and dysfunction. Evidence clearly shows that people with long telomeres age healthier and live longer. The only way to lengthen telomeres is through the activation of an enzyme called telomerase. Currently the only way to activate telomerase is to take TA-65 supplements.

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    What? I have to take iron because of anemia due to celiac disease. I've switched from Rx Ferrex to the health food liquid Floravital. I hope it does less damage.

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  • About Me

    Miranda Jade became extremely involved in celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and gluten issues a number of years ago after many years of misdiagnosing. Since this time, she has engaged in diligent research and writing about these topics, developing gluten-free recipes, and reviewing companies for the celiac consumer’s safety on her award-winning website: GlutenFreeHelp.info. Being a first time mother, Miranda is diligently working hard to help all families increase their awareness, the signs, diet changes and testing options regarding gluten issues. She believes raising a healthy happy gluten-free family doesn’t have to be difficult.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/22/2009 - Is celiac disease sidelining the cherished CEO of one of America's iconic companies?
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    Robert Lustig, M.D. is with the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology at UCSF, and speaks on behalf of the Hormone Foundation, which is the public outreach arm of the Endocrine Society. Dr. Walter Willett is chair of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.
    References:
    Apple letter from Steve Jobs:
    http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2009/01/05sjletter.html Motley Fool: Apple Out of a Jobs - Tim Beyers
    http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2009/01/15/apple-out-of-a-jobs.aspx TIME: What's Ailing Steve Jobs? Medical Opinion Varies - Tiffany Sharples
    http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1869975,00.html Bloomberg: Apple Disclosures About Jobs Said to Face SEC Review (Update4) - David Scheer and Connie Guglielmo
    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=aDL78iMCdOzk Thyroid Problems Often Seen with Celiac Disease:
    http://www.healthcentral.com/ibd/news-275806-66.html


    Carol Frilegh
    Celiac.com 04/15/2010 - Ten years ago, I embarked on a life that came with a warning about the Specific Carbohydrate Diet from my naturopathic  practitioner, "it is a great diet, but a hard one." Those were fighting words to someone who has made a lifetime of  "cosmetic" dieting  with tendencies to yo yo back and forth into the obesity zone. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet diet was chosen to relieve pain.
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    Emma Haan
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/05/2014 - To remain healthy, people with serious gluten intolerance, especially people with celiac disease, must avoid foods containing gluten from wheat, barley, and rye. Accordingly, gluten detection is of high interest for the food safety of celiac patients.
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    Source:
    J Food Prot. 2014 Oct;77(10):1830-3. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-14-149.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Jean Duane
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    This column will present a scenario such as the one above, and ask that you comment on how you would navigate it. Let’s talk about it. Let’s share ideas.  Using the example above, here’s the scenario for this issue:
    What would you do?
    Your kind-hearted friend invites you to dinner and insists on cooking for you.  You arrive and the first thing she says is, “I’ve spent all day making this for you. Oh, I bought this salad dressing for you, but you might want to read the ingredients first.”  You do, and it contains malt vinegar.  You look around the kitchen and notice evidence of cross-contamination in the rest of the meal.  What do you do? 
    Please comment below and feel free to share the tricky scenarios that you’ve encountered too.  Let’s discuss how to surmount these social situations.  What would you do?

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/12/2018 - Previous research has shown that the oral administration of Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start super strain (NLS-SS) reduces of gastro-intestinal symptoms in untreated celiac disease patients. The reduction of symptoms was not connected with changes in intestinal permeability or serum levels of cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors. Therefore, researchers suspected that the reduction of symptoms might be related to the modulation of innate immunity.
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    The research team included Maria I. Pinto-Sanchez, MD, Edgardo C. Smecuol, MD, Maria P. Temprano,RD, Emilia Sugai, BSBC, Andrea Gonzalez, RD, PhD, Maria L. Moreno,MD, Xianxi Huang, MD, PhD, Premysl Bercik, MD, Ana Cabanne, MD, Horacio Vazquez, MD, Sonia Niveloni, MD, Roberto Mazure, MD, Eduardo Mauriño, MD, Elena F. Verdú, MD, PhD, and Julio C. Bai, MD. They are affiliated with the Medicine Department, Farcombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; the Small Intestinal Section, Department of Medicine and the Department of Alimentation at Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Gastroenterology Hospital and Research Institute at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    The team determined the numbers of macrophages and Paneth cells, along with the expression of a-defensin-5 expression via immunohistochemistry in duodenal biopsies.
    Their results showed that a gluten-free diet lowers duodenal macrophage counts in celiac disease patients more effectively than B. infantis, while B. infantis lowers Paneth cell counts and reduces expression of a-defensin-5.
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    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol