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    Many Naturally Gluten-Free Foods May be Contaminated


    Destiny Stone

    Celiac.com 07/21/2010 - Naturally gluten-free foods have long held the assumption that they are supposed to be gluten-free. However, a new study has found that many naturally occurring gluten-free foods are in fact not gluten-free.


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    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, and people with gluten sensitivities know to avoid those grains. However,  a new study lead by celiac disease nutrition consultant, Tricia Thompson, proves that many naturally gluten-free grains, seeds and flours found in your local supermarket are definitely not gluten-free.

    Tricia and her team of researchers evaluated 22 naturally gluten-free seeds, flours and grains that were not labeled as being “gluten-free”. They tested the products using the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards for acceptable gluten levels of 20 parts contaminant per million parts product. Trish and her researchers found that 7 of the 22 products tested, would not pass the FDA standards, including millet grain and flour, buckwheat flour, and sorghum flour.

    Currently the FDA does not mandate that companies labeling their products as “gluten-free” actually test for acceptable gluten levels in their products. Although, under the new proposed FDA gluten-free regulations, the FDA would be able to inspect foods labeled “gluten-free” for validity of the gluten-free claim.

    Unfortunately the scope of this study is not vast enough to determine exactly which products to watch out for, but Tricia and her  colleagues agree that more research is needed in this area. Meanwhile Tricia recommends that people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities only purchase grains, flours and seeds labeled as “gluten-free”, as these products are more likely to be tested for acceptable FDA levels of gluten.

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    Guest Rodney

    Posted

    I will from now on purchase products labeled only "gluten-free".

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    Thank you for writing about this issue. I was also stunned to see on a package of frozen vegetables the "same equipment used for wheat products". I am extremely sensitive and after 13 years since diagnosis I am still finding foods I wouldn't expect to be cross contaminated, are.

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    Guest C. Mazza

    Posted

    The issue here is that there are facilities that do both gluten and gluten free manufacturing, unless there is a lot of handling awareness and care, there is a possibility of gluten contamination. Some people have very low tolerance to gluten, others can tolerate a 20-30ppm well, and those products that have 20-30ppm (depending on the market) are considered gluten free.

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    This is great information... no wonder why I keep getting sick over foods from my local market that say "Naturally gluten free" So I am definitely going to stay away from those products that is for sure!

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    This information has explained why I get sick every time I eat something from my supermarket that says "Naturally gluten free"! Thanks for sharing...I will definitely not be buying anymore foods that say "Naturally Gluten Free"!

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  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

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    Sayer Ji
    Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar.
    Were it true that these four foods were health promoting, whole-wheat-bread-munching, soy-milk-guzzling, cheese-nibbling, corn-chip having Americans would probably be experiencing exemplary health among the world's nations. To the contrary, despite the massive amount of calories ingested from these purported "health foods," we are perhaps the most malnourished and sickest people on the planet today. The average American adult is on 12 prescribed medications, demonstrating just how diseased, or for that matter, brainwashed and manipulated, we are.
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    Unfortunately these “authoritative” recommendations go  much further in serving the special interests of the industries that produce these commodities than in serving the biological needs of those who are told it would be beneficial to consume them.  After all, grains themselves have only been consumed for 500 generations – that is, only since the transition out of the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era approximately 10,000 years ago.  Since the advent of homo sapiens 2.5 million years ago our bodies have survived on a hunter and gatherer diet, where foods were consumed in whole form, and raw!  Corn, Soy and Cow's Milk have only just been introduced into our diet, and therefore are “experimental” food sources which given the presence of toxic lectins, endocrine disruptors, anti-nutrients, enzyme inhibitors, indigestible gluey proteins, etc, don’t appear to make much biological sense to consume in large quantities - and perhaps, as is my belief, given their deleterious effects on health, they should not be consumed at all.
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    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 04/15/2010 - Mother's day is right around the corner, and what better way to tell your mom you love her, than to make her  a lovely gluten-free brunch. Even if your mom is a gluten eater, it is still a  perfect opportunity to try out some new gluten-free recipes. Many people with gluten sensitivities are also sensitive to foods other than gluten. That is why for this special day, I am including some gluten-free recipes that are also free of most common allergens.
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    The following link is for a recipe that I can't wait to try. This basic recipe can be elaborated on, and you can top with the fruit of your choice. This is an excellent idea for brunch, or wrap them up and present them as a gift.

    Vegan Gluten Free Lemon Coconut Cream Scones  The wonderful thing about the following Tofu Benedict  recipe,  is that it can be modified to suit your taste buds. If you eat meat, you can add gluten-free meat to your Benedict, or anything that you think your mom would enjoy on her special day. It's also a very easy recipe and doesn't take long to prepare.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/26/2012 - A Canadian woman is fighting a battle with the government of British Columbia to protect the services that allow her 18-year old daughter to live at home in Quesnel, B.C., with 24-hour care — much of it provided by Shelley McGarry herself.
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    Source:

    http://www.canada.com/Disabled+woman+faces+battle+government+care/5593715/story.html

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au