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    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Medical Tourism Expands to Stem Cell Treatments


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 07/05/2012 - As more people seek out affordable medical services in foreign countries, the variety of available medical services continues to grow. Stem cells are just the latest in the list of medical services being targeted at foreign visitors.


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    Photo: CC--caribbA company called MediCAREtourism, a division of an Oman-based travel and hospitality company called Travel Point LLC, is introducing medical packages, including, stem cell treatments, to foreign travelers visiting destinations in Asia and the far east (Korea, Malaysia, and Singapore).

    Stem cell treatments are a type of intervention strategy that introduces new cells into damaged tissue in order to treat disease or injury. Many medical researchers believe that stem cell treatments have the potential to change the face of human disease with minimal risk of rejection and side effects.

    Medical researchers anticipate that adult and embryonic stem cells will soon be able to treat cancer, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Celiac Disease, cardiac failure, muscle damage and neurological disorders, liver cirrhosis and most importantly spinal injuries/paralytic cases from road accidents.

    Stem cell treatment is one of the fastest growing medical medical services in the world today, and provides many people with tremendous benefits, says Mr. Aslam Sayed Mohamed, Manager for MediCAREtourism, said.

    Travel Point is teaming up with Ming Medical Services of Malaysia to offer the stem cell packages, along with free medical consultation and general health checkups for all of their passengers traveling to Thailand & Malaysia.

    The health checkups will be held at accredited hospitals like Paulo Memorial Hospital in Bangkok (Thailand), Prince Court Medical Centre in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) and Sime Darby Medical Centre Ara Damansara in Selangor (Malaysia).

    This means that, in addition to free medical consultation, and general health checks, Travel Point customers traveling in Asia and the Far East can choose very affordable stem cell therapy packages to Malaysia and Thailand.

    Commenting on the importance of these treatment options, Dr. Sean NG, Managing Director, Ming Medical Services says stem cell treatments can give "100% cure to ailments like Vitiligo, Aging, Diabetes, Diabetic Ulcers, Autism, Cosmetic Abnormalities and end stage heart diseases."

    In a related story for the HuffingtonPost, Anthonia Akitunde notes that what was once regarded as an option only for the rich, medical tourism is becoming more and more popular among regular people. She cites estimates by Patients Beyond Borders, which produces guidebooks on medical travel, that in 2012, 600,000 people traveled abroad for treatment -- a number anticipated to grow 15 to 20 percent annually as boomers age.

    Source:


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--caribb
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    This article is really amazing and truly informative, it is much much appreciated.

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    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    The following is a post from Ron Hoggan - Q: I asked the doctor what an inflamed mucosa could mean and he shrugged and then added parasites, maybe? She was tested for parasites way back before her first biopsy (October 96).
    A: Have you tried eliminating dairy? Volta et. al. have demonstrated that 36% to 48% of celiacs tested were also intolerant to milk protein. Borner et. al. have demonstrated sequence homology, from the N-terminal, between casein and gliadin. The other three cited below are also identifying milk protein intolerances associated with celiac disease.
    Playing the odds, exclusion of dairy is most likely to help. But there are other significant dietary allergens that might be eliminated if a dairy free diet, in addition to the Gluten-free diet, doesnt help.
    Borner H, Isolation of antigens recognized by coeliac disease auto-antibodies and their use in enzyme immunoassay of endomysium and reticulin antibody-positive human sera. Clin Exp Immunol 106(2), 344-350 (1996)
    Hvatum M, Serum IgG subclass antibodies to a variety of food antigens in patients with coeliac disease. Gut 33(5), 632-638 (1992)
    Ciclitira PJ, Gliadin antibody production by small intestinal lymphocytes from patients with coeliac disease.Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 89(2-3), 246-249 (1989)
    Volta U, Antibodies to dietary antigens in coeliac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol 21(8), 935-940 (1986)
    Ciclitira PJ, Secretion of gliadin antibody by coeliac jejunal mucosal biopsies cultured in vitro. Clin Exp Immunol 64(1), 119-124 (1986)

    Kristen Campbell
    Celiac.com 10/02/2008 - Anyone with confirmed gluten sensitivity knows what a web of conflicting research and medical opinions he or she must wade through in order to get diagnosed. Sadly, it is a rare thing for a patient to have to consult less than a handful of doctors, and consider many various ailments before hearing the life-altering statement: You have celiac disease.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/20/2012 - Candi Smithson says her 2-year-old son, Preston, has severe allergies that present him from eating certain breads and dairy items, among other things. Celiac disease prevents Preston from eating anything containing gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.
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    When asked about Candi Smithson's ordeal, Birsto said, “I do think she is right to challenge this." There are some ambiguities in the law, but, basically, Bristo says, "…if a food allergy affects life activities, it's got to be considered a disability and should fall under the act.”
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    Has anything like this happened to you or anyone you know?  Should restaurants be flexible when paying customers need to bring in outside food for reasons concerning allergies or food sensitivities? Let us know your thoughts.
    The story was originally reported by NewsOk.com.
    Source:

    http://newsok.com/oklahoma-mother-says-muskogee-pizza-hut-discriminated-against-son/article/3627995

    Jefferson Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
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    Source:
    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
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    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com