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    Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity: Fact or Fiction?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/28/2013 - An entry in the Patient Journey section of the British Medical Journal highlights the confusion around non-celiac gluten sensitivity (doi:10.1136/bmj.e7982).


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    Photo: CC--PerterJr1961In the entry, a person without celiac disease describes how, after years of unexplained health problems, a chance conversation on an internet forum led him to try a gluten-exclusion diet.

    He claims he saw dramatic results: “Within a week of excluding gluten and lactose from my diet, all my symptoms had dramatically improved in just the same way as when I previously starved myself.”

    After accidentally eating gluten the symptoms returned “within hours.” Such dramatic relief of symptoms led him to seek out what he calls “proper diagnosis.”

    This, in turn, led him to Kamran Rostami, whose account of the condition supplements the patient’s story. Rostami says that the patient, like others had "negative immunoallergy tests to wheat and negative coeliac serology; normal endoscopy and biopsy; symptoms that can overlap with coeliac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and wheat allergy.” Symptoms resolved on a gluten-free diet. Since there are no biomarkers, gluten sensitivity is the ultimate diagnosis of exclusion.

    However, these facts, along with the lack of a disease mechanism have left some clinicians unconvinced.

    Some, like Luca Elli are calling for aspects of gluten sensitivity clarified before doctors start “treating” people for this new “disease” (doi:10.1136/bmj.e7360).

    Elli asks some logical questions, such as "Is gluten sensitivity different from irritable bowel syndrome, or is it simply a variant that benefits from a common therapeutic approach?"

    To get an answer, many clinicians are looking to published literature (doi:10.1136/bmj.e7907). For example, a few randomized trials suggest that non-celiac gluten-sensitivity is a real condition, affecting 6% of nearly 6000 people tested in a Maryland clinic.

    A multi-center trial is currently recruiting people without celiac disease, but with gluten sensitivity for a challenge with gluten or placebo.

    Meanwhile, clinicians are advising that patients who have had celiac disease excluded through blood tests and duodenal biopsy be told that they may suffer from a newly recognized clinical condition which is not yet fully understood.

    In related news, a letter published this week by David Unsworth and colleagues describes an “explosion of requests” for serological testing since 2007, particularly from primary care physicians (doi:10.1136/bmj.e8120). They note that NICE guidance in 2009 has done little to reduce the requests.

    They also point out that, as the number of people being tested has risen, the rates of confirmed celiac disease has fallen to just over 1%, which is no better than rates achieved by random screening.

    They call for more targeted testing, limited to groups in whom detection rates are highest: children with failure to thrive, family history, or type 1 diabetes, and adults attending diabetes and gastroenterology clinics.

    However, such advice would seem to ignore cases like those described in the Patient Journey, cases where people with negative blood tests and biopsies benefit from a gluten-free diet.

    What do you think? Is non-celiac gluten-sensitivity a real condition? Do you or anyone you know come up negative on blood tests and biopsies, but suffer from gluten-sensitivity? How should doctors proceed? Share your comments below.

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    I think we should stop calling it a disease and start calling it what it is. America is the biggest producer of wheat which makes it both understandable and affordable for wheat and gluten to be in food, but human bodies aren't meant to eat mass quantities of anything and wheat isn't all that great for you in the first place. I was fortunate enough to finally test positive and get a diagnosis. At first I was angry and I thought how bad is this going to suck, but I got so sick and for so long I thought why not. Its been a year and not only do I have more money in my pocket but my whole life is healthier and just by eating naturally. I think eating so much wheat and gluten and junk growing up just finally took its toll on my body. Maybe I can't tolerate it. Maybe others can eat it sometimes or they can't at other times or whatever. But when are we just going to come out and say that we really just shouldn't be eating any of it in the first place? At this point, it's only a disease and disability because the modern world has pumped us full of this crud for so long that we can't take it anymore, yet they make it so that's the only thing immediately available. Its poisoning our people. I think its time for change all around. Change your life and perspectives.

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    All of a sudden, at the age of 50, I started to have very serious reactions to things I was eating. They were always following the same scenario, with the bottom line being: I could not keep food in. After some testing and some more testing I was declared healthy and "would find out what not to eat". I had lost more than 40 pounds in 3 years and was afraid to go anywhere, or eat anything. A move to a different state and an alternative way of looking at my "non-problems" health situation suggested that I had a severe intolerance to gluten. I am following a strict gluten-free diet and am happy to report that doing so has eliminated all of my problems. I get occasionally glutened when I eat out and know it within 30 minutes. It is the same old scenario. So, for me, I know that I have a real condition. I would like doctors to take this condition seriously.

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    Guest Sophia Fletcher

    Posted

    I believe that it is happening to some people. I did endoscopy and colonoscopy which did not conclusively detect celiac disease. But whenever I ingest gluten by mistake my symptoms return. All along doctors told me I had IBS. I don't understand it at all. I cannot say I was diagnosed with celiac disease, but eating gluten makes me really sick. I have been gluten-free for about 4 years now.

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    Guest Linda Segall

    Posted

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a fact. Please read The Gluten Connection (Rodale 2007) by nutritionist Shari Lieberman PhD, with Linda Segall. This condition can be tested with a stool test at EnteroLab (enterolab.com) in Dallas. It is estimated that up to 29% of all people have this condition!

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    Guest Elizabeth Ceman

    Posted

    Should there be new tests? Since the wheat has itself been changed? Very simple and logical question, yes?

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    Guest Diane W

    Posted

    All of a sudden, at the age of 50, I started to have very serious reactions to things I was eating. They were always following the same scenario, with the bottom line being: I could not keep food in. After some testing and some more testing I was declared healthy and "would find out what not to eat". I had lost more than 40 pounds in 3 years and was afraid to go anywhere, or eat anything. A move to a different state and an alternative way of looking at my "non-problems" health situation suggested that I had a severe intolerance to gluten. I am following a strict gluten-free diet and am happy to report that doing so has eliminated all of my problems. I get occasionally glutened when I eat out and know it within 30 minutes. It is the same old scenario. So, for me, I know that I have a real condition. I would like doctors to take this condition seriously.

    My experience exactly!

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    Guest Astra

    Posted

    My tests, genetic testing and biopsy were negative and I was told I possibly could not have celiac disease. I had dermatitis similar to herpes rash which went away on the gluten-free diet. My father is gluten sensitive, and my father's mother's sister died of celiac disease. I am extremely sensitive. 7 years on gluten-free diet. I think scientific community have not found all the right genetic markers yet.

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    A research study that I have seen indicates that approximately 30% of the population carries the gene for celiac disease, and approximately 1% of the population has Celiac Disease. It seems very possible that some with the gene, but not with verifiable celiac disease may have some degree of gluten sensitivity. I wonder if there is any research showing how many of those with "just gluten sensitivity" have tested positive for having the gene for celiac disease. (The last time I checked, the cost of the genetic testing was about $800.00.)

    The fact that our wheat now has more gluten, and extra gluten is added to some food products, probably has boosted the number of people with symptoms of gluten sensitivity.

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    Guest michelle

    Posted

    I have seen with my own eyes, in my own child, that it is true to have gluten sensitivity without celiac disease. My firstborn has celiac disease. When my second born started exhibiting similar symptoms, I took him for celiac blood tests - negative. Many of them negative. He experimented with dairy-free diet, taking pro-biotics, duodenal biopsy also was negative and looked 100% healthy. He felt horrible for years. Then, one year for Lent he "gave up gluten to understand and support" his celiac brother. Guess what - he's been gluten-free and feeling better ever since. We even have really good celiac GI docs at the University of Chicago and still... this is what it took to figure it out. Hopefully a marker will be discovered.

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    Guest Montie

    Posted

    I too tested negative for celiac disease after an endoscopic biopsy. I had resolution of my symptoms (GI upset, mental fogginess, general feeling of malaise, abdominal bloating, etc.) within a week of eliminating gluten from my diet. If I do ingest gluten, I am feeling the effects by the following day. This condition is real and I feel that doctors should at least explain the possibility to patients with these symptoms and then the patient can choose whether or not to follow a gluten-free lifestyle. It is difficult at times, but I will never go back to feeling so bad!

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    Guest L Carter

    Posted

    I am one of those who tested negative on the serology test, endoscopies + biopsies, and the gene test... but wheat definitely bothers me. I am dairy-free and gluten-free and hereditary fructose intolerant. It may be the fructans (a wheat starch made up of long fructose chains) which is really the culprit. I am wondering if others who are non-celiac gluten intolerant really have fructose malabsorption (which is surprisingly common) or have HFI (which is rarer) like me? Anyway, it's an interesting possibility.

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    Guest Desiree

    Posted

    I don't see why this can't be considered a condition when lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome are accepted. Those, along with gluten intolerance, are not detected by tests or concrete evidence, but by symptoms reported by the patient and through trying out different diets and/or medicines that don't cure, but alleviate symptoms. I agree with Cait in that America puts too much wheat in the diet, and I think that cow's milk is the same issue. Anyway, I was diagnosed with gluten intolerance, and I feel better when I don't eat gluten. I feel bloated, tired, and in pain when I do. So I don't. What does it really matter if doctors want to call it a disease or not? If you feel better eliminating a particular type of food from your diet, then do it.

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    Guest joyce cuccia

    Posted

    2 years ago I did a stool test through Enterolab. The results were borderline sensitive, I would say. But I stopped eating gluten and my hot flashes went away, as did joint pain and stomach pain with diarrhea. I cannot eat anything with gluten, and if I accidentally get glutened, I get very sick now. After I took a round of antibiotics, it has taken over a month to recover from gluten symptoms and reaction. I have no one but me and the Internet to learn what is going on. Doctors in my state of Colorado are clueless. Research papers and this website have helped so much.

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    Guest Louise

    Posted

    My experience is the same as Cait's and Judith's. I won't go near the stuff with a 10' pole (knowingly). I too know within 30 minutes if not sooner if I've been glutened. There's no way I would go back on it for a study!

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    Guest Katie

    Posted

    I have one daughter who tested negative for celiac on the blood test but positive for celiac on the biopsy. My other daughter tested negative to celiac on the blood test and biopsy, but all symptoms disappear with a gluten-free diet. Of course non-celiac gluten intolerance is real. It could be because the wheat we now have is not the wheat of yester-year. It is now genetically modified and therefore not compatible with many people's digestive system. Seems logical to me; I don't understand the doubt and debate.

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    Guest Ann Mitchell

    Posted

    I am gluten-sensitive and do not have celiac disease.

    My gastro doctor said (many years ago) I should just eat like I have celiac disease. So I do. I get immediate nausea if I eat something with gluten in it. I am also on digestive enzymes which help a lot.

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    Guest Elizabeth

    Posted

    I have a biological celiac daughter and celiac on my husband's side. My own TTG was negative. Since going gluten-free (over one year ago) my GI symptoms have disappeared, my skin has improved and my temperature regulation has greatly improved. Mostly, I believe I am now processing fat correctly. My cholesterol levels are now good, so my doctor has taken me completely off simvastatin. My thyroid levels are improved and may soon require a reduction in my meds for Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

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    Guest Melissa

    Posted

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is real or we just don't know how to test properly for celiac disease. Either that or I continue to be a medical mystery and would like to know what caused the permanent neurological damage that was a result of Vitamin E deficiency. And the wicked hives that I get when I get glutened. Or why all my digestive system symptoms and problems went away after 2 weeks of going gluten-free. I am truly tired of being called a medical mystery. Let's call it what it really is: we don't understand celiac disease or how to test for it properly.

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    Guest ScottR13

    Posted

    I have "Gluten Sensitivity." I also had my whole family tested and they also have "Gluten Sensitivity." This condition affects a lot more people then anybody realizes. There also are blood tests already for this, however, it seems like very few of us know about them (I work in a lab and I'm also a Wellness Coach). When the true number of people with "G.S" is known, that number will be staggering.

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    Guest Chris

    Posted

    I had suffered from GI distress from age 18 to age 58. At one point it was so bad I could not straighten up due to the pain; I looked like a skeleton with skin, knew the location of every clean restroom in town and used many restrooms no sane person would enter. At age 30 I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease, no mention of celiac disease, and I was put on a bland diet. There was no improvement in my condition. At age 58, a genetic profile indicated that I was unlikely to suffer from Crohn's, but highly likely to suffer from celiac disease. I went on a gluten-free diet. Within a week, my symptoms began to vanish. Within a month, I was symptom-free. THEN I unknowingly ate at a restaurant that served nothing whatsoever that is gluten-free. Within two hours, my symptoms all returned. Several other 'incidental' exposures to gluten have had the same effect. But, since I started the gluten-free diet prior to having antibody testing, the tests came out negative. I have maintained the gluten-free diet for 3 years now and my GI doctor declared after a colonoscopy that he could find no evidence of either Crohn's or celiac disease. Call it what you will, I am highly sensitive to gluten and have no test results to confirm celiac disease or Crohn's.

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    Guest Susan

    Posted

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is very real. My mother has been diagnosed with celiac disease so my daughter and I were tested. Both of us tested negative for celiac disease, however, both of us have sensitivity to gluten. We both have DH during what we call "Gluten Bouts." We also experience the bloating and intestinal distresses. Gluten sensitivity is very, very real.

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    Completely in agreement with 'Cait' above; at age 64 after three months of intestinal problems and after checking symptoms on the Internet, I decided to do a gluten-free trial. The results were so dramatic, it was like magic. Almost all my symptoms disappeared within three days, and the rest (dermatitis etc.) are also improving bit by bit. This was almost a year ago and I feel so much healthier and happier that I never intend to eat gluten again. I am undiagnosed simply because I had been gluten-free for three months before testing, so of course it came back negative, the only way for me to find out is to start eating gluten again and get tested but this would be unpleasant and a complete waste of time just to get a written diagnosis which is of no use to me whatsoever. Since four years ago I also suffer with Hashimoto's thyroid condition, for which apparently going gluten-free is recommended, though my endocrine specialist never mentioned this to me!

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    Guest K Hall

    Posted

    I know that this is a very real condition and am still struggling to find a doctorwho will take me seriously.

    I developed a severe reaction to gluten a few years ago but came up negative on blood and biopsy tests (likely because they were run far too late), however if I get even the slightest cross-contamination, I'm left trying to recover over a period of 4-6 months. Yes, months, not weeks like most 'normal' celiacs. I've been gluten-free and trying to heal for the last year and a half but can still can barely eat the few whole foods I have on my short menu. I understand that some celiacs never truly get under control even with the gluten-free diet, and perhaps this is me. This can't be normal -- I'd like to get a genetic test but my doctor still tells me I have IBS. I am looking for a second opinion now. While IBS is certainly possible, I don't believe it's the whole story. I am hoping more research is done on this subject.

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    Guest Shirley Braden

    Posted

    I'm not sure why a site whose very publication is titled Journal of Gluten Sensitivity would be asking this question. Was your publication renamed to that name just to get more non-celiac readers, not because you, in fact, did believe that gluten sensitivity is real? Your publication certainly has many, many articles about non-celiac gluten sensitivity. It's disappointing to see the reality of gluten sensitivity questioned here. It makes me wonder if this article is yet another one that has a title and subject just to stir folks up and attract attention.

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    Guest Gryphon

    Posted

    I'm not sure why a site whose very publication is titled Journal of Gluten Sensitivity would be asking this question. Was your publication renamed to that name just to get more non-celiac readers, not because you, in fact, did believe that gluten sensitivity is real? Your publication certainly has many, many articles about non-celiac gluten sensitivity. It's disappointing to see the reality of gluten sensitivity questioned here. It makes me wonder if this article is yet another one that has a title and subject just to stir folks up and attract attention.

    Evidence would suggest that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is real (and we would agree that it is) but believe it or not, it's still a point of debate in scientific circles.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    I noticed the salt working in a couple of hours.  I was beginning to absorb the water (I didn’t have to pee every time I drank some water).  It took about two days before the thirst went away.  It was great waking up without a parched throat.  The coughing was still uncontrollable, especially at night, but instead of a constant, non-productive coughing and horrible wheezing, the mucus was beginning to become looser.  It took another three nights before I could sleep lying down, but the mucus had really broken up.  The coughing was actually allowing the mucus to get out of my lungs.  It took about six days to feel like myself again.  I did gain about five pounds.  But I lost it quickly and it was fat lost, not precious water.  Besides, there’s nothing glamorous about walking around in a dehydrated, sickly state.
    The second step is to not let this happen again.  I’m now drinking no less than 10 eight-ounce glasses of water every day with a pinch of salt on my tongue if I feel I need it.  I need about ¼ teaspoon of salt for every quart of water I drink.  After a lifetime of poor medical advice, I now know that salt is my friend.  If I drink coffee or wine or if I get the nutty idea to exercise, I have to drink more water.  And no more milk and cream - at least until I’m stabilized for awhile.
    If I feel an asthma attack coming on, the best treatment is to drink 2-3 cups of water and put a pinch of sea salt on my tongue.  This will provide my body with the water it needs and the salt will send a signal to my brain to relax the bronchioles by letting it know relief is coming. 
    Conclusion
    As difficult as this last health adventure was, I learned something that has changed the way I feel and has optimized my health.  I found the root of the problem and fixed it instead of following mainstream medical thinking and putting a band aid on the symptoms.  It’s really scary when it feels like your body is turning on you, and very empowering when you use science and knowledge to get yourself back.  I’ve always said when it comes to business, “the market speaks, just listen.”  I now need to take that advice for myself.  My body speaks; I just have to listen!

    Wendy Cohan
    Celiac.com 04/01/2011 - On March 10th, Chef Damian Cardone boasted on Facebook that he delights in feeding diners who specifically requested gluten-free meals a variety of gluten-filled dishes instead. He states on his Facebook page that he does not believe in gluten intolerance and that it’s “all in their disturbed little heads.” Clearly, chef Cardone did not attend a reputable institution of culinary arts, where classes in food allergies are now standard, and guest lecturers who are specialists in celiac disease and gluten intolerance are frequently invited to speak to students. Hopefully in the future, dining will be safer, gluten-free guests will be accommodated with creativity and courtesy, and uneducated, malicious food workers like Mr. Cardone will be unable to find employment in the food industry.
    I am also very surprised by Mr. Cardone’s naiveté, in assuming none of the diners who ate at his establishment would take legal action, and that there would be no repercussion. We are a litigious society, and I certainly hope that once word gets out in the gluten-free community, and make no mistake—it will—that legal action will be taken. I must also assume that Mr. Cardone is not aware of the current correctional institutional residence of a certain bread baker in North Carolina, who also knowingly sold gluten-containing items marketed as “gluten-free” to unsuspecting consumers. When these consumers became ill, they reported this to health authorities, who investigated. Their investigation quickly led to charges, and the conviction of the criminal involved. Most criminals are not very intelligent, and that’s why they are eventually caught, so I hope that Mr. Cardone keeps this in mind. If for no other reason than to save his own skin, this Colorado “Chef” should immediately give up any participation in the food preparation industry. His behavior is not intelligent, and he is not worthy of diners’ trust. This brings up another interesting line of thought regarding food service.
    Does Mr. Cardone break any other rules? Does he wash his hands after using the bathroom, blowing his nose, or touching raw meat? Does he believe in food-borne illnesses such as Salmonella, E. coli outbreaks, or Clostridium? Does he feed soft cheeses to pregnant women, who may suffer miscarriage due to Listeriosis?
    People can, and do, die from complications related to celiac disease, which now affects an estimated 1 in 100 people in the U.S. Non-celiac gluten intolerance may affect up to 12% of the population. That means that on a night when he plated 100 dinners, not uncommon for a mid-size restaurant, that 12 of those dinners had the potential to cause a negative reaction in the consumer. Mr. Cardone is apparently unaware that most reactions to gluten are not, in fact, gastrointestinal. Neurological reactions to gluten far outnumber gastrointestinal reactions. Neurological reactions can include: contributing to abnormal behaviors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, foggy or disturbed thinking, ataxia (disturbances in gait and coordination), tremors, exacerbating and triggering MS symptoms, muscle weakness, fatigue, depression, bipolar disorder, and even schizophrenia. I personally know and have helped to treat gluten-intolerant patients with all of these disorders. So, Mr. Cardone was partially right. For many patients, it is “all in their heads”, but that doesn’t mean that the symptoms aren’t real, and that they are not caused by ingesting gluten. In fact, Mr. Cardone’s disturbed behavior may be caused by consuming a diet filled with gluten. Perhaps he deserves our compassion, and he needs a medical checkup—Pronto!
    I am a foodie—a former prep, pantry, line-cook, and pastry chef. I have spent years working at many of the finer dining establishments in Boulder and Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Does Mr. Cardone think that I would willingly have given up making and eating my own gluten-filled homemade croissants, danish, challah, bagels, black forest cake, salmon-en-croute, beef wellington, spanakopita, and baklava if I didn’t have to? Celiac disease nearly killed me, and it caused me over a decade of severe pain, none of which was located in my gastro-intestinal tract. In my restaurant days, I had what I thought was “a cast-iron stomach”, never once experiencing a bout of diarrhea, bloating, indigestion, heartburn, or gas related to my dietary intake. But, eventually my health deteriorated, and eventually I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and all of my extra-gastrointestinal symptoms have subsided on a 100% gluten-free diet. It scares me to think that anyone would deliberately sabotage my health by substituting foods containing gluten for my specially requested gluten-free meal. I certainly hope there aren’t any copycats out there, who are stupid enough to engage in such risky and criminal behavior. Intentionally inflicting harm on anyone is a crime.
    When dining out, I call ahead, I speak politely to my waitperson and often ask them to communicate with the chef, I eat what I’m served without complaint, I give verbal thanks, and I tip extraordinarily well when my request for a safe, gluten-free meal is accommodated. But Mr. Cardone does not want guests like me in his restaurant. That is his loss, but it is not and never will be his right, to purposefully inflict pain and suffering on other human beings, people who are paying him money to serve them safe food. He is guilty of so many crimes it’s difficult to fathom, and I certainly hope that his days of freedom to continue poisoning diners will end soon.
    Luckily, the gluten-free community has many other options, and gluten-free diners will learn to avoid any establishment in which Mr. Cardone has any affiliation. Even though Mr. Cardone does not deserve any compassion, I would never wish for him, or anyone, to be diagnosed with celiac disease. It’s just too painful…
    Author's Note:
    Thank you to Chad Hines for spreading the word about this occurrence. Mr. Cardone live in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, where he works as a private chef, and also at the Italian restaurant "Florindo's" in Glenwood Springs, Colorado.


    Chris Bekermeier
    Celiac.com 03/06/2013 - The hallmark of a healthy gluten-free diet is a grocery cart filled with mostly unprocessed, single-ingredient foods such as fresh produce, nuts, and meat. This is the easiest way to avoid gluten, as well as the healthiest way to eat. When you do venture into the central aisles of the grocery store, look for gluten warning signs on packaging to help you identify foods that contain gluten.
    Looking for those warning signs is more important than ever because companies are catching on to the growing popularity of gluten-free diets and many are labeling their products gluten-free. However, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) does not regulate how or when the designation of gluten-free can be added to food labels. This clouds the decision-making process for people with gluten intolerance that rely on gluten warning signs on packaging to guide them. Without USDA regulation, even products labeled gluten-free may still be processed on equipment that also processes gluten. While this is not a problem for people eating gluten-free as a dietary choice, it can cause issues for people who are gluten intolerant.
    Ingredient Keywords
    Look for warning signs at three places on the ingredient label. The first is underneath the ingredients list, where common allergens such as soy and milk are listed in bold. If wheat is listed there, the product contains gluten.
    The second place to look is the ingredients list itself. The following words may be signs of gluten due to its nature or to cross-contamination:
    Wheat Malt Wheat starch Barley Oats Soy sauce (made with wheat) Even seemingly innocuous products may still contain gluten, so it's important to look at all product labels. For example, yogurt and other dairy products sometimes have gluten-containing thickening agents, many sauces and soups contain gluten, and beer is made with barley hops. 
    The third place to look for gluten warning signs on packaging is at the bottom of the ingredients list. In bold, the packaging will declare whether or not the food was processed on equipment that also processes common allergens, including wheat. Cross-contamination can still cause flare-ups, so these foods should be avoided.
    Safest Foods
    The best way to avoid gluten is to stick to unprocessed, fresh produce and meat. With grains and processed foods, the best way to stay safe generally is to opt for minimally processed foods with few ingredients, or specialized foods. Strategies for gluten-free shopping include: 
    Foods in the health aisle or in a natural food store are most often accurately marked as gluten-free. Cook what you can at home and take the mystery out of ingredients. Gluten-free bread, for example, can be made at home using the flour of your choice. Do research before shopping - it can save you time and trouble in the long run. While reading food labels may seem intimidating at first, after a few shopping trips, you will be a pro at identifying problem foods and cooking gluten-free, while still eating a healthy range of foods.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 12/22/2014 - Is your child sneaking a bite here and there off his or her needed gluten-free diet? You should know not only for the health of your child but to also ensure there are no other issues you need to help address, such as an allergy to nuts or dairy which can cause other issues. As a parent we need to stay on top of things to get to the bottom of any “unresolved” issues in their little bodies. If your child has been diagnosed with celiac disease, it’s critical that he or she follows a diet 100% free of gluten. Alarmingly, according to Celiac.com, 43% of celiacs cheat on their gluten-free diet, and 13% cheat 20-40 times per year or more for various reasons.
    One of the reasons children may cheat on their diet is because they don’t have substitutes for their favorite gluten-containing foods. Have a talk with your child about the gluten-containing meals, snacks, and desserts he or she craves and misses and make sure there are plenty of gluten-free versions of these foods available at all times, especially over the holidays.
    Another reason celiac children may cheat on their diet is because eating gluten doesn’t make them feel sick. It’s important to sit down with your celiac child and have a heart-to-heart talk about how even though your child doesn’t feel sick, gluten is still wreaking havoc on the villi of the intestines which in turn can lead to very serious health conditions such as infertility and gastrointestinal cancer. You may want to include your child’s doctor or nutritionist in this discussion.
    Lastly, get your child excited and proud to be gluten-free. Have your celiac child join a local celiac children’s group to stay motivated and feel “normal” and connected to others with the same dietary restrictions. Pick out special gluten-free recipes to make for dinner or dessert. Attend a gluten-free cooking class together. There are many ways to his or her celiac pride.
    Your child won’t be tempted to cheat when you make this recipe!
    Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies
    This is the original Toll House recipe, halved because I don’t want to make so many cookies. These are really delicious!
    Ingredients:
    A heaping 1 ¾ cup rice flour or gluten-free flour mix ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 stick shortening, Earth Balance, or butter ½ cup brown sugar ¼ cup white sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 egg ½ package gluten-free chocolate chips Nuts (optional) Directions:
    Preheat oven to 375F degrees. Mix sugars and shortening or butter until creamy. Beat in egg, then dry ingredients except chocolate chips and nuts, if using. Once smooth, add chips and nuts and roll into balls. Flatten slightly. Bake 8-10 minutes. Let cool on cookie sheets. Remove and eat or store in an airtight container. Enjoy!  NOTE: You may replace the egg with egg replacer or applesauce to make them vegan.
    Resources:
    About.com: Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Die About.com: Don’t Let These Problems Derail Your Gluten-Free Diet Celiac.com: The Gluten-Free Diet: Curse or Cure? 

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.