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    Claire is studying the attitudes of older adults diagnosed with celiac disease toward physical activity at the University of Victoria. She has been diagnosed with celiac disease since she was 20 years old, and writes an academic-oriented gluten-free blog at gfc.tumblr.com, where she posts academic article summaries, corporate correspondence, and a few extras on the side.

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    Gryphon Myers
    Celiac.com 05/23/2012 - In April 2012, the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness debuted its Tiered Credentialing system, whereby restaurants can be awarded varying levels of a gluten-free designation. The system has spawned much controversy, as many sufferers of celiac disease argue that there should be no flexibility with the gluten-free term. Many argue that a food either contains gluten, or it does not: leading people to believe gluten-contaminated products are gluten-free could be harmful to celiacs.
    The issue came to a head when the NFCA awarded Domino's 'gluten-free pizza with an 'amber' gluten-free designation. The controversy is in the preparation: while Domino's may use gluten-free ingredients to make the crust, no extra effort is put forth to avoid contamination (hence, their 'amber' credential rather than 'green', which would be awarded to restaurants who take more care to avoid gluten contamination). Such contamination is almost assured given the volume of gluten flour present in a typical pizza restaurant kitchen, so many have argued that an 'amber' designation is really only useful to people who are gluten-conscious, but do not suffer from any form of gluten sensitivity. 
    A number of celiac disease experts have come forth to denounce Domino's crust and the NFCA's endorsement of it. The NASSCD has even gone so far as to accuse Domino's of “exploitation”, given the gluten-free diet's recent surge in popularity. 
    Domino's or the NFCA might argue that their crust was never intended for those with celiac disease, and that the 'amber' designation indicates that, but as Dr. Steven Guanalini, president of NASSCD argues,“there should be no need for disclaimers. The threshold has to be set at the same level for everybody for the term gluten-free to be meaninful.”
    In what may be viewed as something of a victory for the celiac community, the NFCA announced that in response to overwhelming public pressure, it is suspending use of its “amber” credential. According to their press release, they will "conduct a review to determine the most effective and clearest way to warn the community of the risk of cross-contamination and the use of the phrase 'Gluten Free'". It is still unclear what this means for Domino's.
    Sources:
    http://nrn.com/article/dominos-under-fire-labeling-crust-gluten-free?page=0,0 http://www.celiaccentral.org/nfca-statement-7937/

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/16/2013 - Scientists are making progress on the creation of a pill that would allow people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten in much the same way that lactase pills allow people with lactose intolerance to eat dairy products without upsetting digestion.
    As with lactase, the approach involves the use of an enzyme to break down the gluten that causes celiac symptoms.
    When people consume wheat, rye or barley, enzymes in the stomach break down gluten into smaller pieces, called peptides. For most people, these peptides are harmless. But for the 2 million-3 million Americans with celiac disease, the peptides trigger an autoimmune response and painful symptoms.
    Currently, the only way for people with celiac disease to avoid the autoimmune response and the accompanying symptoms is to avoid gluten altogether.
    However, Justin Siegel, Ingrid Swanson Pultz and colleagues think that an enzyme might be able to further break down the offending peptides in the stomach, thus permitting people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten-containing foods.
    Their efforts led to the discovery of a naturally occurring enzyme that has some of the ideal properties for doing so. They then used a computer to modify the enzyme in the laboratory so that it would do the job completely.
    The newly engineered enzyme, which they called KumaMax, breaks down more than 95 percent of gluten peptides associated with celiac disease in acidic conditions that mimic the stomach.
    Clearly, further research and trials are needed, but these early results make the new enzyme a strong candidate for oral use in the treatment of celiac disease.
    What do you think? Would you take spill that allowed your body to safely digest gluten from wheat, barley or rye without any of the symptoms or damage associated with celiac disease? Share your thoughts in the comments box below.

    Source:
    Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2012, 134 (50), pp 20513–20520. DOI: 10.1021/ja3094795 

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/27/2014 - Here are seven common myths people have about celiac disease and gluten-free eating.
    Myth #1: Rice contains gluten, and people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance shouldn’t eat it.
    Status: FALSE.
    People with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance have adverse immune reactions to gluten proteins in wheat, rye and barley.
    Rice does contain gluten, just not the kind that causes adverse reactions in people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. Plain rice is fine for people with celiac disease.
    Myth #2: A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat.
    Status: MOSTLY FALSE.
    Gluten levels above 20 parts per million can cause adverse immune reactions and chronic damage in people with celiac disease.
    Current medical research defines gluten-levels below 20 parts per million as safe for people with celiac disease, and the FDA and other official organizations use that standard in labeling, those levels are so close to zero as to be “gluten-free.”
    The tiniest crumbs of bread far exceed 20ppm, so eating “a little” gluten is only possible by eating “gluten-free” food. In fact, the only properly recognized treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet.
    Myth #3: Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease.
    Status: FALSE
    Just because food is made with gluten-free ingredients, it is not necessarily safe for people with celiac disease. Case in point, Domino’s Pizza recently introduced gluten-free pizza crusts. However, these pizzas are prepared in the same areas and ovens as Domino’s regular pizzas, and are likely contaminated with gluten from wheat flour. These pizzas are not safe for people with celiac disease. There are many similar cases in the restaurant world. Contamination is a serious issue for some celiacs, so buyers be aware and be wary.
    Myth #4: Celiac disease is a food allergy.
    Status: FALSE
    Celiac disease is not a food allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease. People with celiac disease suffer damage to the lining of the small intestine when they eat wheat, rye or barley. They also face higher risks for many other auto-immune conditions.
    Myth #5: Celiac disease only affects people of European ancestry
    Status: FALSE
    Celiac disease is more common in people of northern European ancestry, but it affects all ethnic groups and is found in southern Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South America.
    Myth #6: Celiac disease is a children’s condition
    Status: FALSE
    Celiac disease can develop at any age. In fact, celiac disease is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 40-60 years old.
    Myth #7: Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening.
    It’s true that classic celiac disease symptoms, like stomach pain, bone pain, fatigue, headaches, skin rash, and digestive issues, won’t kill patients outright. However, undiagnosed or untreated, celiac disease can trigger other autoimmune disorders, and leave patients at much greater risk of developing certain types of deadly cancer.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/06/2015 - The Kellogg Co. has announced the launch of Eggo Gluten Free Waffles in both original and cinnamon flavors.
    Coming on the heels of General Mill’s move to take Cheerios gluten-free, the announcement marks the latest move by major cereal manufacturers into the realm of gluten-free products.
    Eggo Gluten Free Waffles are available nationwide in the frozen food aisle of grocery stores.
    The gluten-free waffles contain eight vitamins and minerals and are considered an excellent source of calcium and iron, with 25% daily value of each. They also contain 15 grams of whole grains per 70-gram serving.
    Kellogg's is taking special care to make their new gluten-free waffles "delicious and wholesome," and to avoid the pitfall of gluten-free products which "…sometimes sacrifice taste and texture compared with their original versions," said AnneMarie Suarez-Davis, vice-president of marketing and innovation for Kellogg’s Frozen Foods.
    For more information, check out Kelloggs.com.
     

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    Potatoes are good for breakfast! Your concoction sounds pretty good. K, how about this? Peel & dice potatoes, fry them in just enough olive oil to keep them from sticking in a skillet until they begin getting crispy. Toss in diced sweet peppers or maybe chili peppers, onions to soften. I know you're not doing egg yolks b/c of iodine but you can do the whites. Pour egg white on top until the white is done. If you have a steak or some leftover steak, you can heat that on the side. YUM!
    Hi Mom, I am so sorry you're getting the run around. Yes, the links worked for me too & that poor little thing! Cyclinglady gave you excellent advice. I really can't add anything to it but everything she says is right on. Keep advocating!  Read this: https://www.sjsreview.com/8752/features/sophomore-establishes-celiac-support-group/ I found how you can contact her. GenerationGF.Houston@gluten.org Here's the web page. Scroll down to the TX groups. https://gluten.org/k
    Wow!  I can say thank you in Polish, but can not spell it.  This is a bit off topic, but I will post this here and then open a new topic.   A month or so ago, a guest commented on an article that Celiac.com had published.  The guest mentioned that she has been a celiac for decades, long before the gluten free craze.  She noticed that she is now getting more gluten exposures compared to the years when there were very few gluten free processed foods on the market.  Interesting. With
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