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    Pets and the Gluten-Free Diet


    Destiny Stone
    Image Caption: Maya and Dexter

    Celiac.com 05/27/2010 - People don't generally think that the food they feed their pets not only affects their pets, but also impacts their lives as well. Going gluten-free in my house also meant going gluten-free for my pets. Your pets can't tell you if something is wrong. Just like my doctors had no idea that my problems were related to gluten, my veterinarian certainly would never suggest that my dog is gluten-intolerant! It is up to us as pet owners to realize that reoccurring health problems in our pets, could be an indication of  food intolerance's.


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    Deciding to put my pets on a gluten-free diet was not a hard decision to make. My two year old lab/mix, Maya was constantly getting eye infections, which my vet disregarded as environmental allergies. The problem was she had allergies year round and was getting eye infections once a month-which we treated with antibiotics, and benadryl. My vet did not recommend dietary changes for my dog, but I took charge and decided to try a gluten-free diet anyway.

    Since putting Maya on a gluten-free diet, she has not had a single eye infection. She still has mild seasonal allergies, but nothing like she had when she was eating gluten-based dog food. Through my research I found that the first ingredient in dog and cat  food should be meat-which makes sense since they are carnivores. However, most pet food I found (including my previous “grain-free”pet food) listed the first ingredients as a grain; either oats, wheat, barley or rice.

    I recently had my cat tested for parasites. The results were that he had parasites from grain based foods. The vet told me that the parasites were harmless, but as long as I fed my cat grain-based foods, he would continue to test positive for intestinal mites. I switched his food to gluten-free immediately following his vet visit.  Since switching to a gluten-free/grain-free food for my pets, I have seen a huge improvement in all my pets overall health an well-being.

    Aside from the obvious health benefits for my pets, gluten-free food is also better for you. Now that my pets are all eating gluten-free diets, I no longer have to worry so much about possible cross-contamination from touching their food. I can now get slobbery kisses from my dogs worry free. I also no longer worry about washing my dog and cats food dishes in the same sink or with the same sponge as I use for my other dishes.

    Research  is the most important thing to do when looking for a gluten-free pet food.  There are quite a few grain-free options on the market, but be careful, 'grain-free' does not necessarily mean 'gluten-free'; contacting the manufacturer can help to dispel any concerns. Most commercial pet stores do not carry gluten-free pet food options. I found more gluten-free options at the mom and pop pet store I usually frequent. I did a lot of Internet research and talked to my local pet store endlessly to find the right product for my pets. However, you may need to special order your pet food through your pet store, or online. It is also important to introduce new foods to your pets gradually. It is always advised to mix your old food with the new food when first introduced. Ask your veterinarian what the best practice is for introducing new foods to your pets.

     It is also important to find out about product recalls, so as to avoid buying products that have been contaminated. The following link for the FDA  has current and updated information regarding product recalls for pet food and pet food products.

    Gluten-Free Pet Treats
    Many pet treats contain wheat as the first ingredient. When shopping for gluten-free pet treats, the best place to look is in products that are made entirely of meat. Dried chicken or duck strips for example are a wonderful gluten-free option. However, watch out for are any added filler ingredients-it's best to buy products with no fillers. Caution is also important when it comes to the manufacturing of  your pet food. I bought 100% pure duck strips for my dogs, but they both got diarrhea shortly after eating a couple of the treats. After looking more closely at the product, I realized that the ingredients were manufactured in China. I immediately tossed those treats and bought new treats that were made in USA-my dogs no longer have any problems. Trader Joe's also  carries some inexpensive gluten-free dog treats. However, if you do a Google search for gluten-free pet treats, you will see an endless list of possibilities. Making your own gluten-free dog treats is pretty easy. The following link will take you to some easy gluten-free pet treat recipes.
    Gluten-Free Pet Supplies
    Some of the other, less obvious sources of gluten in your pets life can be found in the supplements and care products that you use. Check the ingredients for hidden "gluten" and contact the manufacturers whenever necessary. Keep your hands clean before and after applying any medications or products to your pets that contain gluten. I recently bought some pad moisturizure for Maya's cracked paws and realized the ingredients contained tocopherols -which could contain gluten. Before applying greasy gluten to your pets paws (which would be like asking them to finger-paint with gluten all over your home), contact the manufacturer to determine if all ingredients are gluten-free.

    Hairball Medicine
    I was using a fur ball gel for my cat. The gel requires me to administer it by putting a big glob on my cats paw, so he can lick it off. After reading the ingredients more carefully, I realized that I was putting a big glob of glutenous gel directly on my cat, and incidentally, on myself. If you use a fur-ball gel or any supplements that require you to get them on your hands, you will want to make sure they are gluten-free, or at least clean your hands thoroughly after using. Of course, if you are anything like me and you don't want to get gluten anywhere on your body, use a paper towel. Paper towels have been a blessing for me. I often use paper towels to create a barrier between me and possible gluten contamination. Simply put the hair ball gel on a bunched up paper towel and apply the gel to your pet-the gluten glob never has to touch your skin. There is also  a hairball gel capsule that you can give to your pets (mine refuses to eat them, but many pets like them), which doesn't involve you getting messy with a glutenous gel. Also, brushing your pet regularly will reduce the likelihood of them getting fur-balls. So find the right brush for your pet and try to incorporate brushing into your daily routine.

    Shampoos and Soaps
    Many pet shampoos and soaps, like people shampoos and soaps, contain gluten. Try to find a shampoo or soap that doesn't have any gluten ingredients if possible.  I use a tea-tree castile soap on my pets. Castile is naturally gluten-free and  is a gentle alternative to some of the harsh pet shampoos and soaps with unpronounceable ingredients I usually find on the market. If you can't use a gluten-free shampoo, make sure to rinse your pets very well and wash your hands thoroughly after bathing your pet.

    Toothpaste
    Most veterinarians recommend brushing your pets teeth at least three times per week. If you cannot brush their teeth for any reason, you should get their teeth cleaned professionally 1-2 times per year. Professional cleanings are much more expensive than brushing at home, so yes, I brush my pets teeth. Many pet toothpaste gels contain gluten. Obviously, finding a gluten-free toothpaste is ideal, however if that is not an option make sure to wash your hands thoroughly after coming into contact with any gluten containing products.

    Gluten-Free Quick Check:

    • Use gluten-free pet food
    • Use a gluten-free toothpaste
    • Make homemade gluten-free pet treats
    • Use a gluten-free hairball gel
    • Wash your hands often
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    Guest Squeak

    Posted

    You can use EVO which is all meat. It comes in red meat and chicken. I figured out I was getting gluten every day when I gave the dogs their "Scooby Snack". Since then, I have found that if my new puppy plays with another dog that is not on a gluten-free diet, I get sick from picking her up and handling her. I even have a friend who loves me enough to have put their new puppy (my puppy's sister) on a gluten-free diet so I don't have to worry.

     

    One more place for us to look. The search and learning is never ending.

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    Guest Millies Wolfheart

    Posted

    the public need educating about pet food but it is very hard to do so. Most people wont even consider gluten-free dog food unless their pet has been affected. This needs to change. Keep up the good work!

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    Guest Abigail

    Posted

    Pumpkin Paw Bakery makes great organic all natural dog treats. They are only made with natural ingredients that are designed to help your dogs health. Best part is that they are gluten free and corn free. They offer lots of flavors and are made to order.

     

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    Guest Crosswind

    Posted

    Anybody have a good "gluten-free" Feline Hairball Gel or options (and products that do NOT contain trans fats / hydrogenated oils)? ~~ most are made with Malt syrup, which of course comes from the barley grain, which can have gluten. I have an asthma cat who's been getting UPI & developed a lot of allergies. All 3 of my cats have been grain free for many years. I think my cats are allergic to Pumpkin seeds and puree. They sneeze and cough for couple days after I give it to them. I'm thinking maybe coconut oil? I read petroleum jelly is an alternative, but that seems harsh and it's not made to be edible.

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  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

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    Miranda Jade
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    Jefferson Adams
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    What would you do?
    Your kind-hearted friend invites you to dinner and insists on cooking for you.  You arrive and the first thing she says is, “I’ve spent all day making this for you. Oh, I bought this salad dressing for you, but you might want to read the ingredients first.”  You do, and it contains malt vinegar.  You look around the kitchen and notice evidence of cross-contamination in the rest of the meal.  What do you do? 
    Please comment below and feel free to share the tricky scenarios that you’ve encountered too.  Let’s discuss how to surmount these social situations.  What would you do?

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/12/2018 - Previous research has shown that the oral administration of Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start super strain (NLS-SS) reduces of gastro-intestinal symptoms in untreated celiac disease patients. The reduction of symptoms was not connected with changes in intestinal permeability or serum levels of cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors. Therefore, researchers suspected that the reduction of symptoms might be related to the modulation of innate immunity.
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    The research team included Maria I. Pinto-Sanchez, MD, Edgardo C. Smecuol, MD, Maria P. Temprano,RD, Emilia Sugai, BSBC, Andrea Gonzalez, RD, PhD, Maria L. Moreno,MD, Xianxi Huang, MD, PhD, Premysl Bercik, MD, Ana Cabanne, MD, Horacio Vazquez, MD, Sonia Niveloni, MD, Roberto Mazure, MD, Eduardo Mauriño, MD, Elena F. Verdú, MD, PhD, and Julio C. Bai, MD. They are affiliated with the Medicine Department, Farcombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; the Small Intestinal Section, Department of Medicine and the Department of Alimentation at Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Gastroenterology Hospital and Research Institute at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    The team determined the numbers of macrophages and Paneth cells, along with the expression of a-defensin-5 expression via immunohistochemistry in duodenal biopsies.
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    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol