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    Restaurant Tells Customers it Doesn't "Give a Sh*t� About Gluten-free Food


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 10/06/2014 - Anyone who has ever had difficulty ordering gluten-free food at a restaurant can likely appreciate the scene that recently played out at a San Francisco restaurant called SO.


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    Photo: CC--Theen MoyAfter back-to-back problems with “rude customers,” employees of the eatery staged a walkout. The next morning, the management posted a sign that not only made their feelings clear about the situation, but let no doubt about they position on MSG, organic food, and gluten-free food.

    The sign read:

    We are CLOSED

    Because of You

    (Customers)

    SO…

    *YES we use MSG!

    SO…

    *We don’t believe in organic food

    AND…don’t give a

    s$#& about gluten free

    The walkout allegedly occurred after one party refused to pay for food they said was ‘too spicy,’ and another cursed at the owner.

    Granted, the dustup likely has more to do with rude patrons than with difficult gluten-free diners, but the management is making it clear that this is one place you will not be getting gluten-free food.

    It’s too early to tell whether the SO will suffer any blowback from their actions, but stay tuned for further updates.

    Here is the Yelp! page for SO.

    In the meantime, what do you think? Are you offended at the owner’s attitude? Or maybe happy they have made their position so clear? Or confused to see gluten-free lumped in with MSG and organic food?


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    Guest Heather Twist

    Posted

    S'alright ... I don't give a rip about restaurants anymore either. I mean, I used to eat out a LOT ... hundreds of dollars a month. Now I don't. Because it was just too dang hard to figure out how to get food that made me didn't feel sick after the meal.

     

    I do so wish for restaurants that serve edible food again. I tell you though, once you start cooking real, homemade, quality food, the restaurant industry will have to jump through a lot of hoops to compete with the Moms of the world. We got lazy and gave up on "good home cooking" and the restaurants got lazy too, relying on pre-cooked packaged meals.

     

    Meanwhile guys, don't worry! I won't bother you with my questions about shared fryers or gluten-free soy sauce. I'm off to enjoy another amazing dinner. And I'll spend the tip money on ME.

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    No, I'm not offended! Someones actions reflect who they are! I can CHOOSE not to eat there! I'm thankful I have the right "still" to choose!

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    Guest Duncan

    Posted

    Well I am offended by the tone of the sign, had they said that they have no intention of catering for gluten-free diners then that would have been a different story.

     

    Of course the management of the restaurant has the right to decide for whom they prepare food, but there's just no need to use language of this nature. One thing is an informative sign, quite another is one that's down right rude to a certain group of customers.

     

    It would appear that the management of SO treat gluten-free as some type of eating choice or fad rather than the medical imposition that it is. I don't think that anyone with celiac disease would actively choose, or promote, the dietary stipulations that we are required to follow. Yet another eating establishment to cross off the list.

     

    Could you imagine the reaction if a bank had a sign that said they don't give loans to ethnic group x posted at their door?

     

    FYI SO management, if there's a celiac in a group of people that's going out to eat, it's usually that person that chooses where.

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    Guest Carmen

    Posted

    Well I am offended by the tone of the sign, had they said that they have no intention of catering for gluten-free diners then that would have been a different story.

     

    Of course the management of the restaurant has the right to decide for whom they prepare food, but there's just no need to use language of this nature. One thing is an informative sign, quite another is one that's down right rude to a certain group of customers.

     

    It would appear that the management of SO treat gluten-free as some type of eating choice or fad rather than the medical imposition that it is. I don't think that anyone with celiac disease would actively choose, or promote, the dietary stipulations that we are required to follow. Yet another eating establishment to cross off the list.

     

    Could you imagine the reaction if a bank had a sign that said they don't give loans to ethnic group x posted at their door?

     

    FYI SO management, if there's a celiac in a group of people that's going out to eat, it's usually that person that chooses where.

    Been celiac for over 12 yrs, had skin/digestive problems since 1990, gone to several md's that seemed NOT to care (Hispanic, white)finally February '02 a new dr moved here, she suspected several food allergies, she did an Elisa test, within a few days results were back, she told me that I had celiac disease plus allergies to many foods, broccoli,cauliflower, bell peppers, etc. I learned that there's 2 choices, eat gluten-free & feel/act or eat whatever & suffer. I make my gluten-free bread few times a week, my friends are aware of my health problems & truly care. Yes, its a learning process, skin is clear (no more rashes,I'm still very sensitive to sun (tomato red in less than 10 minutes, must wear sunblock daily)overall doing much better gluten-free, read ingredients very carefully, eg 2 weeks ago bought "gluten-free brownie mix" son baked them. Next am spent 3 hrs in bathroom, painful. Contained sorghum flour (few of us celiacs have a reaction with it or to it, goes on "Do not eat list". Been warned that if I keep irritating colon I could get cancer.

    No thank you! Prefer to stay on gluten-free regimen & stay well

    also an Diabetic on insulin since '93 (I eat what I'm supposed to eat not what I want to eat,lots of protein/veg & very few carbs, only 1300 calories per day)doing well, kidneys are well & eyes are too.

    Thanks for help with disease.

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    Guest Jennifer

    Posted

    I'm not offended or angered! I've been gluten-free for over 22 years. If all restaurants posted their stance on serving people with particular diet needs it would make it easy for us to know that we simply shouldn't eat there. There are plenty of other places willing to accommodate special diet needs - go to one you know and trust or eat at home!! Simple!

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    I give them points for honesty and subtract a few for lacking tact. I have heard diners complain that jalapenos on their pizza were too hot, so I'm almost sympathetic on that point. It would at least let me know not to dine there.

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    It's so difficult to get reliable information about the risks of eating at any particular restaurant. I appreciate being informed even if the tone is rude. Of course, my family will not be eating there, nor hanging out for the good company...

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    Could care less about the SO, would never eat there and that includes my friends. If they don't care about organic or gluten-free, how good must their food be?

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    I heartily approve of sign! I think it is funny, and I would appreciate knowing right off the bat if it is worth my time and effort to try to eat somewhere. It is not their problem that I have serious dietary problems. I do not expect anyone to cater to my needs.

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    Guest LeeinPinetop

    Posted

    Sounds like they were having a bad day but that doesn't excuse them for the rude sign. I can understand restaurants not wanting to have any gluten free items. It is so easy to cross contaminate and it takes a whole station/equipment dedicated to feeding a very small % of their customers. I expect most feel they would be open to a law suit if they screwed an order up.

     

    I'm new to gluten free but have been checking labels for a year do to a severe cottonseed oil allergy. Luckily, I can have some flour like in cream sauces and our favorite restaurants are Thai. We never ate out a lot and I can usually find something on the menu to eat but unless the whole restaurant is gluten free, I don't think I'd eat out if I had celiac disease unless I could bring my own food and they could serve it.

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    Guest sc'Que?

    Posted

    Sounds like the owner of SO is an S.O.B. But I'd rather know where I stand when I go into a restaurant, so now I know. It's pretty common that people like him, though, typically realize the err of their ways when someone close to them--or even they themselves--comes down with a major G.I. disorder. He's bound to deal with it sooner or later--in this life of the next.

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    Sad, not offended! I don't blame the restaurant for getting frustrated to the point of exasperation! I imagine it's getting to be as 'no fun' to be a restauranteur these days, as it is 'no fun' for me to go out to eat anymore. It's become a minefield for both sides trying to maneuver through all the food issues. Does make me angry at demanding people who push gluten free as fad diet rather than the medical issue it is for the majority of us. My husband makes a big deal at restaurants (while I try to crawl under the table) about gluten-free both because he likes to go out to eat and also because he has to live with me in severe pain if I accidentally ingest gluten (once an emergency room visit). I just spent the weekend at a retreat in conversations with many people who were confused about the gluten issue, some mixing it up with really just wanting a low-carb diet. I also ran into some who started to dine at the separated gluten-free food because they didn't know better; almost ran out of lunch and dinner a couple times. I so wish people would get better educated about this, get the information correct!

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    Guest Michelle

    Posted

    Well I am offended by the tone of the sign, had they said that they have no intention of catering for gluten-free diners then that would have been a different story.

     

    Of course the management of the restaurant has the right to decide for whom they prepare food, but there's just no need to use language of this nature. One thing is an informative sign, quite another is one that's down right rude to a certain group of customers.

     

    It would appear that the management of SO treat gluten-free as some type of eating choice or fad rather than the medical imposition that it is. I don't think that anyone with celiac disease would actively choose, or promote, the dietary stipulations that we are required to follow. Yet another eating establishment to cross off the list.

     

    Could you imagine the reaction if a bank had a sign that said they don't give loans to ethnic group x posted at their door?

     

    FYI SO management, if there's a celiac in a group of people that's going out to eat, it's usually that person that chooses where.

    Well, in their defense, most of the gluten-free crowd ARE fad dieters, and a lot of them can be really annoying. Celiacs are a smaller crowd, and most of us are pretty hesitant to eat out any way, so I don't think we are necessarily who the sign is aimed at. Regardless, I get their frustration, though the sign was a bit rude. Either way, if that is their stance, I would be glad to know it so I don't eat there. Much worse are the restaurants that PRETEND to care about keeping our food safe, but are rolling their eyes as they walk away from the table, and cross contaminating things in the kitchen because they think we are just over-reacting. At least these people were honest.

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    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 06/15/2018 - There seems to be widespread agreement in the published medical research reports that stuttering is driven by abnormalities in the brain. Sometimes these are the result of brain injuries resulting from a stroke. Other types of brain injuries can also result in stuttering. Patients with Parkinson’s disease who were treated with stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, an area of the brain that regulates some motor functions, experienced a return or worsening of stuttering that improved when the stimulation was turned off (1). Similarly, stroke has also been reported in association with acquired stuttering (2). While there are some reports of psychological mechanisms underlying stuttering, a majority of reports seem to favor altered brain morphology and/or function as the root of stuttering (3). Reports of structural differences between the brain hemispheres that are absent in those who do not stutter are also common (4). About 5% of children stutter, beginning sometime around age 3, during the phase of speech acquisition. However, about 75% of these cases resolve without intervention, before reaching their teens (5). Some cases of aphasia, a loss of speech production or understanding, have been reported in association with damage or changes to one or more of the language centers of the brain (6). Stuttering may sometimes arise from changes or damage to these same language centers (7). Thus, many stutterers have abnormalities in the same regions of the brain similar to those seen in aphasia.
    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2018 - There have been numerous reports that olmesartan, aka Benicar, seems to trigger sprue‐like enteropathy in many patients, but so far, studies have produced mixed results, and there really hasn’t been a rigorous study of the issue. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether olmesartan is associated with a higher rate of enteropathy compared with other angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).
    The research team included Y.‐H. Dong; Y. Jin; TN Tsacogianis; M He; PH Hsieh; and JJ Gagne. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA; the Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Science at National Yang‐Ming University in Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Hepato‐Gastroenterology, Chi Mei Medical Center in Tainan, Taiwan.
    To get solid data on the issue, the team conducted a cohort study among ARB initiators in 5 US claims databases covering numerous health insurers. They used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for enteropathy‐related outcomes, including celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy. In all, they found nearly two million eligible patients. 
    They then assessed those patients and compared the results for olmesartan initiators to initiators of other ARBs after propensity score (PS) matching. They found unadjusted incidence rates of 0.82, 1.41, 1.66 and 29.20 per 1,000 person‐years for celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy respectively. 
    After PS matching comparing olmesartan to other ARBs, hazard ratios were 1.21 (95% CI, 1.05‐1.40), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88‐1.13), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10‐1.36) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01‐1.07) for each outcome. Patients aged 65 years and older showed greater hazard ratios for celiac disease, as did patients receiving treatment for more than 1 year, and patients receiving higher cumulative olmesartan doses.
    This is the first comprehensive multi‐database study to document a higher rate of enteropathy in olmesartan initiators as compared to initiators of other ARBs, though absolute rates were low for both groups.
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/12/2018 - A life-long gluten-free diet is the only proven treatment for celiac disease. However, current methods for assessing gluten-free diet compliance are lack the sensitivity to detect occasional dietary transgressions that may cause gut mucosal damage. So, basically, there’s currently no good way to tell if celiac patients are suffering gut damage from low-level gluten contamination.
    A team of researchers recently set out to develop a method to determine gluten intake and monitor gluten-free dietary compliance in patients with celiac disease, and to determine its correlation with mucosal damage. The research team included ML Moreno, Á Cebolla, A Muñoz-Suano, C Carrillo-Carrion, I Comino, Á Pizarro, F León, A Rodríguez-Herrera, and C Sousa. They are variously affiliated with Facultad de Farmacia, Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain; Unidad Clínica de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Spain; Celimmune, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; and the Unidad de Gastroenterología y Nutrición, Instituto Hispalense de Pediatría, Sevilla, Spain.
    For their study, the team collected urine samples from 76 healthy subjects and 58 patients with celiac disease subjected to different gluten dietary conditions. To quantify gluten immunogenic peptides in solid-phase extracted urines, the team used a lateral flow test (LFT) with the highly sensitive and specific G12 monoclonal antibody for the most dominant GIPs and an LFT reader. 
    They detected GIPs in concentrated urines from healthy individuals previously subjected to gluten-free diet as early as 4-6 h after single gluten intake, and for 1-2 days afterward. The urine test showed gluten ingestion in about 50% of patients. Biopsy analysis showed that nearly 9 out of 10 celiac patients with no villous atrophy had no detectable GIP in urine, while all patients with quantifiable GIP in urine showed signs of gut damage.
    The ability to use GIP in urine to reveal gluten consumption will likely help lead to new and non-invasive methods for monitoring gluten-free diet compliance. The test is sensitive, specific and simple enough for clinical monitoring of celiac patients, as well as for basic and clinical research applications including drug development.
    Source:
    Gut. 2017 Feb;66(2):250-257.  doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310148.