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    Starbucks Dumps Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich


    Jefferson Adams


    • May is Celiac Awareness Month, and coffee giant Starbucks is celebrating by dumping their much loved, but not-so-popular gluten-free breakfast sandwich.


    Image Caption: Image: CC--Juozas Šalna

    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.


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    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.

    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.

    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  

    • “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason.
    • “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229.

    Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.

    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

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    Guest bookmuse

    Posted

    NOOO! Please tell me this isn't true!

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    Sadly yes, a girl working there, who mentioned she has celiac and was quite sad as well, told me that it is gone for good.  I for one had recently re-started going to Starbucks because of this breakfast option, but I can go somewhere else. I did really appreciate the we can’t screw it up with our bread tongs protective paper envelope. 

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    Guest GFDiva

    Posted

    oh no! you got an unhappy "celiac" here! - now i'm gonna have to switch to DD!! :(

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    Guest Tammy

    Posted

    I went to Starbuck's the other day and wanted to get the gluten-free sandwich with my reward stars.  I immediately got back to work and went on Starbucks.com to complain about the sandwich no longer being available.  I did suggest that a sausage, egg, and cheese gluten-free sandwich would be better.

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    Guest PSig

    Posted

    The cocoa used in their mochas contains gluten so it was a nice but weak try to serve a gluten-free breakfast sandwich - still no mochas. 

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    Gee, if only they had ADVERTISED that they had a gluten-free breakfast sandwich. But since they never advertised it, I never had a chance to buy it. No wonder they didn't have many sales.

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    Guest Christy

    Posted

    I am also shocked.  I often had them for lunch as well as breakfast.  My starbucks was often out of them,  so I assumed they were popular.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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