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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Starbucks Looks to Add Better Gluten-free Options

    Caption: Starbuck looks to add more and better gluten-free options. Photo: CC--Angela Thompson

    Celiac.com 09/27/2016 - After repeated shareholder requests, and a public admission from the CEO that the company had "really screwed up the gluten free stuff," Starbucks is announcing an expansion gluten-free and other specialty options.

    Until now, Starbucks has relied heavily on packaged foods to meet the rising demand for gluten-free food raises. As part of a new effort to change that, the company recently released its latest offering, the organic gluten-free, vegan, kosher chickpea puff called Hippeas, which is currently available in white cheddar and fajita flavors.

    Over the years, numerous shareholders have demanded that Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz add more food options for people who are either allergic to gluten or choose to eat gluten-free. At the 2015 shareholder meeting, Schultz said the company had plans to address the gluten-free issue because it represents a "big opportunity." He added that, to that point, the company had "really screwed up the gluten free stuff."

    Some gluten-free options are available regionally at various Starbucks, such as the Marshmallow Dream bar and the Kind Bars, but there has been little in the way of quality gluten-free options that are local, aritisanal, etc. "Items in our pastry case can be subject to cross contamination and we use shared equipment," Starbucks spokeswoman Erin Schaeffer said in an email response to questions. "So adding gluten-free options to our broader food portfolio has posed a challenge that we continue to explore."

    The market for packaged gluten-free foods is estimated at more than $3 billion and is continuing to grow.

    Last year, Starbucks launched the Retail Brand Partnership team, which is tasked with finding packaged goods that satisfy various dietary specialty needs.

    Read more in Bizjournals.com.


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    Good news! They pulled their gluten-free muffins before I even knew they were offering them when they tried to add those (at least locally here in Portland, OR). I wish they would give muffins another, better chance.

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    Last I knew the only drink they offered that was gluten free was plain black coffee. Has that changed? (And their coffee tastes awful.)

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    I think the problem Starbucks is having, is not having enough DRINK options. Make all their drink additives gluten-free and they will increase business substantially.

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    Please at least get gluten free packaged options. That way things are safe from cross contamination. My daughter just happens to run a Starbucks inside a grocery store and she said she gets asks no less than 10 times a day for gluten free even gluten-free/egg free offerings. She's been there a couple weeks now. At least get your drinks up to stuff for folks with allergies. PLEASE.

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    I've had two of their salad and even though it didn't read gluten-free on the package it gave me no bad reactions. They were delish!

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    They needed to improve! When I last asked if there was anything gluten-free they pointed to a cake that had been sliced and served using the regular cake slice. It was inches away from regular cake too. In the UK Costa have gluten-free items separately wrapped, which is all we need to feel confident.

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    Last I knew the only drink they offered that was gluten free was plain black coffee. Has that changed? (And their coffee tastes awful.)

    Starbucks has the only gluten free chocolate, so mocha latte, hot chocolate, etc., are all available to you! Don't try the chocolate at Caribou, though. You will get sick. Not sure why Caribou hasn't gotten a clue yet, but it certainly gives Starbucks the edge for celiacs!

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    Finally! I'm still wondering why they can't make their specialty coffee drinks gluten-free across the board?! Grateful they are exploring more gluten-free food options and snacks!

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    Just wish they'd label things better. After some research, I discovered their Java chips are not gluten-free.That should be highlighted - who would guess chocolate chips would have flour in them?

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    The big issue is cross contamination with their beverages. I've been glutened there drinking seemingly safe drinks. Delving a little deeper I found blog posts from employees who talk about how they use shared cleaning tools for the bakery case and beverage prep areas.

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    I was so excited to see this headline, but it turns out there is one new gluten-free item that doesn't sound appetizing at all. Oh well!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Is California Pizza Kitchen Committed to Gluten-Free?
    Celiac.com 09/05/2011 - The rise in celiac disease awareness and the explosion of foods for people who must eat gluten-free is generally a good thing. However, when companies rush products into the gluten-free market without a well-practiced and comprehensive plan, they can easily make mistakes.
    Consider the case of California Pizza Kitchen. In June, the company proudly announced the debut of a gluten-free pizza crust. Then, in August, the restaurant chain quietly pulled the crust from its menu, in what appears to be a re-evaluation of its gluten-free preparation process.
    This is a good thing, since numerous customers complained of symptoms of gluten-contamination, and the company itself acknowledged that their preparation process allowed possible cross-contamination from their standard pizza crusts.
    Many in the celiac community have pointed out that even though the crust is gluten-free, it is being prepared in the same areas as the gluten-containing crusts. So the pizza could be cross-contaminated with wheat, which has adverse health effects for people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity.
    On the California Pizza Kitchen Twitter feed, the company said that it is reviewing its preparation procedures, while leaving open the possibility that it might once again offer gluten-free pizza.
    Efforts by companies like Walt Disney, and more recently by Subway, show that it is possible to consistently deliver a safe and satisfying gluten-free dining experience to large numbers of people. However, it takes awareness of needs of the gluten-free community, and a comprehensive preparation and delivery plan to do it consistently well.
    Ideally, California Pizza Kitchen will learn and grow from this experience, and return from the drawing board with a plan to deliver safe, gluten-free versions of their unique and much-loved pizzas.
    Until then, stay tuned...


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/09/2012 - Subway stores in Oregon are in the process of rolling out gluten-free sandwich buns and gluten-free brownies as regular menu items statewide, according to Subway spokesperson Cathie Ericson.
    For millions of Americans who avoid gluten, due to celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating out can be a constant challenge. Having easy access to a safe, tasty, low-cost gluten-free sandwich is like the Holy Grail for some of those folks. For many, being able to grab a gluten-free Subway sandwich would be a major step toward vanquishing the challenges of eating gluten-free.
    Subway understands that being gluten-free "…really cuts down on fast-casual dining options, particularly sandwiches,” said Michele Shelley, Subway board member and owner.
    Many people were excited to read about Subway's early testing of gluten-free products in selected areas. Many were equally excited to hear about Subway's commitment to getting their gluten-free sandwich offerings right, from start to finish.
    For example, Subway’s wheat-free sandwich rolls and brownies are produced in a dedicated gluten-free facility and are individually packaged. Subway staffers are trained to prevent cross-contamination during the sandwich-making process.
    Moreover, a single employee will prepare a gluten-free sandwich order from start to finish. Other features to Subway's gluten-free process include single-use knives and eliminating contact between traditional sandwich rolls and other ingredients including meat, cheese and vegetables.
    Oregon is one of a handful of states where Subway first tested gluten-free products in selected areas. The current statewide roll out in Oregon comes after a successful test in Bend and Portland, Subway restaurants, and seems to signal Subway's desire to offer gluten-free menus to diners.
    “Subway is known for being a leader in healthy fare, and we are excited to embrace these gluten-free menu items for those who can benefit from them,” Shelley told reporters.
    Source:

    http://community.statesmanjournal.com/blogs/menumatters/2012/01/27/oregon-subways-add-gluten-free-menu-options/

    Scott Adams
    Domino's Pizza Now Offers
    I have a big issue with what I believe to be a misleading headline in a recent joint press release by Domino's Pizza and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA)...here is the headline:
    "Domino’s Pizza Becomes First National Pizza Delivery Chain to Offer Gluten Free Crust"
    When you read the release further, starting at the 5th paragraph, which many people will never get to, it says:
    "While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino’s cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten."
    So my question is this: How can the NFCA, a national organization dedicated to supporting celiacs, actually get behind this? Domino's is obviously a big corporation that has decided it wants to cash in and profit on the new gluten-free gold rush, but they cleary don't want to spend the money that it would take to make their pizzas truely gluten-free, and safe for celiacs.
    The Designations area of the NFCA's web site begins with: "Restaurants that complete GREAT Kitchens earn a designation based on their ability to meet gluten-free needs and avoid cross-contamination with gluten."  Just below this it describes their "Green Designation" and its "Amber Designation," and describes its Amber Designation as follows: "This level requires ingredient verification and basic training of wait staff and managers. Kitchen practices may vary with this designation, level one of the tier system, meaning those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity should ask questions and exercise judgment when dining at an establishment with an Amber Designation. Domino's has earned this designation."  So how has Domino's met "gluten-free needs and avoid cross-contamination with gluten"?
    Also, I think any celiac who watches the video Domino's made for this release will find it a bit scary...the same ovens, pizza scoopers, topping areas, etc., as where they make their regular gluten pizzas.
    I would exclude Domino's as an advertiser on Celiac.com based on this release.
    Some might think that the NFCA has sold out here. I invite them to respond using the comment field below, and I invite you to respond.
     
    Also, there is a lively discussion going on in our forum on this topic.  
    Here is the original press release:
    ANN ARBOR, Mich., May 7, 2012 – Domino's Pizza is responding to the needs of choice consumers, today launching a Gluten Free Crust available in all of its nearly 5,000 U.S. stores and becoming the first national pizza delivery chain to offer such a product.
    Domino’s Pizza (NYSE: DPZ) consulted with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) to ensure its products and team member training meet the standards of the foundation’s GREAT Kitchens Amber Designation. NFCA’s GREAT Kitchens is an official credentialing program that has expanded to include restaurants offering gluten free products with varying kitchen practices, therefore suitable for those with gluten sensitivity under the Amber Designation.
    Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust provides a great-tasting option for consumers who previously could not enjoy pizza from the recognized world leader in pizza delivery because of sensitivity to gluten – a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.
    “Many of our customers have asked for a gluten free crust, and Domino’s is excited to offer a product to customers with mild gluten sensitivity – as well as partner with the NFCA, which has been instrumental to our learning more about how to take this step,” said J. Patrick Doyle, Domino’s Pizza president and CEO. “The prevalence of gluten sensitivity has become a real issue with significant impact on consumer choice, and we want to be a part of the solution. Now, the whole group can enjoy Domino’s with the addition of our new Gluten Free Crust.”
    While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino’s cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten.
    “The NFCA is thrilled that Domino’s Pizza has developed a product that will improve the quality of life for many of the estimated 18 million Americans who are gluten sensitive,” said Alice Bast, NFCA founder and president. “Not only is Domino’s Gluten Free Crust a huge win for much of the gluten free community who can now get pizza delivered to their door, it’s also delicious. Customers aren’t going to believe they’re eating a pizza made on a gluten free crust when they try it. And the variety of fresh toppings that are available is a giant leap ahead.”
    In an effort to remain open and informative about Domino’s Gluten Free Crust, Domino’s has created a video on YouTube that allows customers to decide whether this product is suitable for their diet, found here: www.youtube.com/user/dominosvids.
    “Offering Domino’s Gluten Free Crust is a big step for us, and we wanted to make sure we were doing it right,” said Doyle. “Domino’s is doing that by partnering with experts at the NFCA and by empowering the gluten sensitive community with the information they need.”
    Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is available in stores across the U.S. in a small, 10-inch size only, and prices vary by store.
    Domino’s pizza made with a Gluten Free Crust is prepared in a common kitchen with the risk of gluten exposure. The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness supports the availability of Domino’s Gluten Free Crust, but cannot recommend the pizza for customers with celiac disease. Customers with gluten sensitivities should exercise judgment in consuming this pizza.
    About Domino’s Pizza®
    Founded in 1960, Domino's Pizza is the recognized world leader in pizza delivery.  Domino’s is listed on the NYSE under the symbol “DPZ.”  As of the first quarter of 2012, through its global footprint primarily made up of locally-owned and operated franchises, Domino’s operated a network of 9,810 franchised and Company-owned stores in the United States and over 70 international markets.  During the first quarter of 2012, Domino’s had global retail sales of nearly $1.7 billion, comprised of over $830 million domestically and nearly $855 million internationally.  Domino's Pizza had global retail sales of over $6.9 billion in 2011, comprised of over $3.4 billion domestically and over $3.5 billion internationally. In May 2011, Pizza Today named Domino’s its “Chain of the Year” for the second straight year – making the company a three-time overall winner, and the first pizza delivery company to receive the honor in back-to-back years.  In 2011, Domino’s was ranked #1 in Forbes Magazine’s “Top 20 Franchises for the Money” list.  
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Dunkin' Donuts To Offer Gluten-free Donuts and Muffins Across US
    Celiac.com 07/15/2013 - For gluten-free Americans who love donuts, life just got a little bit better. That's because Dunkin’ Donuts has announced plans to offer gluten-free donuts and muffins in all its US stores by the end of the 2013.
    The Canton-based company field tested gluten-free products in a handful of locations around Boston and Miami, news of which generated considerable social media buzz.
    This news is certainly much heralded by many gluten-free eaters, so it will be interesting to see what the response is like, and how Dunkin' Donuts fares.
    Certainly, the timing is right, with the market for gluten-free goods continuing to see double digit growth, and predicted to top $6.6 billion by 2017.
    Moreover, a recent survey by market research firm The NPD Group, Inc. found about one in three American adults say they want to reduce or eliminate gluten from their diets. For many people,
    Dunkin’s wheat-free cinnamon sugar doughnut clocks in at 320 calories, compared to 260 calories in a regular glazed doughnut. The gluten-free blueberry muffin is 400 calories -- 60 calories less than the standard version. The company said the pastries will be packaged separately to avoid cross-contamination.
    Those who must eat gluten-free, and might want to grab a donut now and then, will be pleased to learn that Dunkin' Donuts says that each donut will be individually wrapped to prevent contamination.

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    Rinsing it off under running water real good, this is to get any CC off. Examples, if there is a open air bakery some flour might have settled on your produce at the grocery store. OR if they are giving out samples some person might have been handling a dounut and touched your produce. Rinsing it off under running water works to remove any trace amounts normally.

    Organic. some people in general react to stuff used in growing produce, IE glyphostphate, or like me I have a issue with the wax they coat them with to keep the fresh. Going organic or farmers market fresh helps some with these. I think your nutritionist is covering all the bases.
    Global Gluten Free Beer market report provides complete analysis with current ... Rise in Obesity, Diabetes, Celiac Disease, Other Diagnosed Food ... View the full article
    Thank you GFinDC. Question. When you say, "quick rinse", can you define what is safe for us to use when washing our fruits and veggies? I know that might sound like something I should know but I am seriously taking no chances (at least not on purpose). I've been buying organic produce because I was told I needed to. Do you find that to be true or do I need to find a new nutritionist? 😉
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