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    Study Shows People with Celiac Disease and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity are More Skeptical of Vaccines, GMO Foods, and the FDA


    Jefferson Adams


    • Are Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity Patients Getting Good Health Information?


    Image Caption: Photo: Dawn Huczek

    Celiac.com 01/16/2018 - More and more, people are adopting a gluten-free diet due to perceived health and weight-loss benefits.


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    A team of researchers recently set out to ask people with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity about their views on the health effects of gluten, and safety of vaccines and gluten-free food products.

    The research team included Loren G. Rabinowitz, Haley M. Zylberberg, Alan Levinovitz, Melissa S. Stockwell, Peter H. R. Green, and Benjamin Lebwohl. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons New York USA; the Department of Philosophy and Religion James Madison University Harrisonburg USA, the Department of Pediatrics Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons New York USA, the Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University New York USA, the Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University New York USA, and the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University New York USA.

    Their team conducted an online survey of celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity patients from a celiac disease center e-mail list. They used univariate and multivariate analysis to compare responses from the two groups. The overall response rate was 27%, with 217 non-celiac gluten sensitivity responses, and 1,291 celiac disease responses.

    Subjects with non-celiac gluten sensitivity were more likely than those with celiac disease to disagree with the statement that "vaccines are safe for people with celiac disease." In all, 41.3% of respondents with non-celiac gluten sensitivity said vaccines are safe for celiacs, while just 26.4% of celiac patients said so. Celiac patients were slightly more likely to decline vaccination when offered, at about 31%, compared with just over 24% of gluten-sensitive respondents.

    After adjusting for age and gender, non-celiac gluten sensitivity subjects were more likely than celiac disease subjects to avoid genetically modified (GMO) foods, eat only organic products, believe that the FDA is not a reliable source of information, and believe a gluten-free diet will improve energy and concentration.

    People with non-celiac gluten sensitivity were more likely than those with celiac disease to have doubts about vaccine safety and to believe in the value of non-GMO and organic foods.

    The team's findings suggest that there might not be enough easily accessible information on gluten and its inclusion in food and drugs, and that may reinforce incorrect beliefs that are contrary to good public health.

    Source: Springer.com.

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    Guest Jeff

    Posted

    This study shows that those with gluten sensitivities are smarter than the general public because everything that they believe is true. For all those who are so certain that all vaccines are good, consider this: I just learned that people with egg allergies should not get the flu shot, yet neither the government nor doctors tells anyone that. That is not the behavior of people that want to present unbiased facts.

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    Guest JillJ

    Posted

    "Subjects with non-celiac gluten sensitivity were more likely than those with celiac disease to disagree with the statement that "vaccines are safe for people with celiac disease." In all, 41.3% of respondents with non-celiac gluten sensitivity said vaccines are safe for celiacs, while just 26.4% of celiac patients said so." If 58.7% of non-celiacs disagree and 73.6% of celiacs disagree, then subjects with NCGS are LESS likely to disagree with the statement that celiacs.

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    Guest Joanna Davis

    Posted

    I am a 73 year old celiac that was diagnosed two years ago. The FDA is a joke, they could care less about what is truly gluten free and what is not. I got gluten in a gluten free turkey that had been injected with gluten free turkey broth at Thanksgiving. Turned out the gluten free turkey broth was made with barley and MSG! I react to gluten and anything made with seaweed (MSG). I filed a formal complaint that was “investigated†by the FDA and my case was closed in 48 hours, because there were no other complaints! After nearly needing to be hospitalized two years in a row with the flu shot, my internist said “no more flu shots for youâ€. I was very sick for three weeks after these flu shots. Skeptical, you are darned right and rightly so. I did not get a flu shot this year and did not get sick with the flu. I am a rabid label reader, research paper reader from the major treatment centers for celiac disease. It pays to be informed and stay informed.

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    Guest Laura H

    Posted

    Many of us with celiac disease spent decades having the medical industry fail us by disregarding our symptoms, attributing them to depression or anxiety or perimenopause, with incorrect diagnoses, and with inappropriate treatments. When the entire industry dismisses you until you are crippled with joint inflammation and pain, have neurological symptoms, blind from eye inflammation, and incontinent with diarrhea and have lifelong damage to your intestines and joints from lack of proper treatment, it's difficult to give them credence in other areas.

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    Guest Pam Lewellen

    Posted

    I think this attests more to the fact that as we start reading labels it leads us to study more things. We learn about dangerous and toxic additives that our FDA approves in vaccines and food. Then that leads us to learn about the toxins in GMO's. We learn so many bad things that can cause cancers and other diseases are approved by our own FDA. We start to wake up and realized eating organic is not necessarily more and when it is, we make sure to eat it and not waste it.

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    Guest Laura

    Posted

    I did not take the flu shot last fall because I heard about: Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuncts. Ingredients called Adjuncts in the vaccine (e.g. aluminum compounds) are designed to stimulate the immune system. In some individuals these chemical compounds can "trigger" a cascade of immune reactions and symptoms (ASIA) and may eventually manifest as overt autoimmune disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder. Having this susceptibility, the decision to inject adjuncts into one´s system must be carefully weighted as autoimmune diseases are debilitating and much varied.

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    Guest Scott Adams

    Posted

    I did not take the flu shot last fall because I heard about: Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuncts. Ingredients called Adjuncts in the vaccine (e.g. aluminum compounds) are designed to stimulate the immune system. In some individuals these chemical compounds can "trigger" a cascade of immune reactions and symptoms (ASIA) and may eventually manifest as overt autoimmune disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder. Having this susceptibility, the decision to inject adjuncts into one´s system must be carefully weighted as autoimmune diseases are debilitating and much varied.

    This is a common belief that is not based on any science.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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