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  • Dr. Frank Jackson
    Dr. Frank Jackson

    The Celiac Dilemma: Getting Enough Fiber Without Wheat

    Celiac.com 12/17/2013 - One of the biggest hurdles for those who have celiac disease is finding a way to get enough fiber in their diets. Removing wheat from the equation also eliminates a huge amount of roughage. Wheat provides the fiber in many breads, pastas, crackers and other staples of the American diet. Replacing that fiber is crucial, since the added bulk moves the food through your digestive system and keeps you regular.

    Photo: CC--Rich AndersonYou should be aiming to consume between 25 and 35 grams of fiber per day. Here are a few ways to ensure you’re getting enough fiber in your diet, whether you’ve been living with celiac disease your entire life or just for a few weeks.

    Bulk Up Your Food

    There are plenty of fiber-rich foods that do not contain gluten. For example, fruits and vegetables are a great, all-natural source of fiber. You can add them to soups and sauces for a flavorful kick that will also provide a few extra grams of fiber. Skip the croutons on your salad — most contain gluten anyway — and sub in raisins for a sweet, filling treat.

    Flaxseed and chia seeds are two superfoods that are naturally gluten free and contain a hefty dose of fiber. Stir them into smoothies, sprinkle on your breakfast cereal, or shake them over yogurt to give it a bit of a crunch. With several grams of fiber per serving, nuts are also a great addition to just about any main or side dish. Kidney beans or chickpeas can be stirred into soups to increase the fiber count.

    Use Supplements

    Adding a supplement to your diet can be an excellent way to make up for the fiber you’re losing by not eating wheat. You’ll want to find natural supplements that mimic the way fiber found in food breaks down in your gut. One smart option is a prebiotic, such as Prebiotin — a plant fiber that also provides good bacteria to the colon, further aiding in digestion.

    Make Adjustments

    It’s possible to increase the fiber content in your diet by making simple substitutions. Perhaps you have always eaten white rice, which is easier on your sensitive stomach than brown. Well, now’s the time to give fiber-rich brown rice another try. Since your celiac diagnosis has probably cleared up most of your GI issues, you should be able to eat brown rice now without issue. Or try fiber-laden quinoa, a rice substitute that’s rich in both fiber and protein, as well as millet or amaranth as a white rice fill-in.

    Keep a Tally

    Before your celiac diagnosis, you may not have paid any attention to your daily fiber intake. But now it’s essential to track it for at least a few weeks to make sure you’re getting enough fiber. Aim for 20 grams at first, until you get the hang of searching out non-wheat fiber sources. Eventually, you’ll want to get to 25 or more grams per day, and you may find it’s not as hard as you expected.


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  • About Me

    Dr. Jackson was educated at Princeton, Johns Hopkins Medical School and the University of Pennsylvania and praticed gastroenterology for almost 40 years. He is the founder of several companies, including Jackson GI Medical (makers of Prebiotin), Chek-Med and Meducate.

  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 03/29/2010 - For many cultures, Easter represents the most important religious feast of the year. In biblical terms, it represents a celebration of Christ being resurrected. Yet, for those of us unable to digest gluten, it is yet another holiday reminding us of all the foods we can't eat.  Many of us that are gluten sensitive, myself included, spend so much time focused on the foods we can't eat, that it's easy to lose sight of all the wonderful foods still available to us. The fact is,  most of our favorite foods are still safe to eat with a little modification of course.
    Being gluten-free doesn't mean that you can't enjoy a holiday meal with your family and friends. If you are going to be a guest for the holiday, make sure your host knows about your food sensitivities, and understands how to accommodate your needs. If they can accommodate you-great! If not, make sure to bring your own gluten-free foods to be sure that you don't go hungry, and to avoid the temptation of eating something you might regret later. You may want to consider hosting Easter brunch at your house this year. Cooking the meal yourself assures that your meal will be gluten-free and eliminates the possibility of cross contamination.
    Whether you are making Easter brunch or Passover dinner, it's all supposed to be fun. That's why I put together a list of links that are all geared toward making it the best gluten-free Easter ever! The following links are a compilation of gluten-free recipes and prepared foods designed to make your holiday easy and fun. Some of the following links will take you out of  Celiac.com and into another site. You may want to bookmark this list so you can reference it easily as needed. Dig in and enjoy!
    Passover wouldn't be complete without matzoh. That's why the first recipe I've included is for gluten-free matzoh. The nice thing about the following matzoh recipe is that it's not only Kosher, it's also gluten, corn, sugar, dairy, and egg free! So even if you have many food restrictions, this is one recipe that is safe for almost everyone. Just add the matzoh to your favorite soup recipe, chicken or mock-chicken and you are ready to celebrate!
    Gluten-Free Matzoh Of course no Rosh Hashanah  is complete without Challah. The following recipe is gluten-free and has an option to be dairy-free as well.
    Gluten-Free Challah with a Dairy-Free Option Most meat in its pure form is gluten-free. However, during processing many meats are injected with gluten ingredients. The following links will help you determine which meats are gluten-free. Although, it is always a good idea to contact the manufacturer to verify that their meat is indeed gluten-free.
    Gluten-Free Turkeys Gluten-Free Hams The following are some  links  that will take you to easy and/or already prepared foods for Easter and Passover.
    Gluten-Free Breads:
    Gluten-Free Breads Gluten-Free Frozen Bread & Rolls Gluten-Free Baking Ingredients Gluten-Free Gravy:
     
    Easy Gluten-free Gravy Mixes Gluten-Free Desserts:
     
     
    Linzertorte Frozen Desserts Frozen Pies Easter Candy:
    It is so tempting to sample all of the yummy Easter candy out there, but don't forget that many Easter Candies are NOT gluten-free. During Passover and Easter, there are so many opportunities to go to parties with friends and family where there is a plethora of Easter snacks and candy; even office events will put your sweet tooth to the test. I recommend avoiding the temptation to sample Easter candy that may contain gluten, by bringing your own gluten-free candy to social events. Bringing gluten-free Easter candy to share with others will make it easier on you when it comes to sampling, because you can sample the candy you brought while also sharing with others. Informing your friends of your gluten-free candy requirements is also an option, it  might even make a good  conversation topic. The following is a list of gluten-free Easter candy. Please remember to check with the manufacturer if you have any questions.
     
     
    Gluten-free Candy Easter Candy Safe/Unsafe List As a newbie to the gluten-free community, I also have many other dietary restrictions. That's why finding gluten-free food is only half the battle for me. I also need to find food that fits all my other dietary requirements. Here is a site that I came across while looking for gluten-free, vegan recipes. These recipes all sound really amazing and I can't wait to try as many as possible! I must emphasize however, that I could not possibly try all of these recipes. So it is up to you to try the recipes that sound good to you and decide for yourself if you like them or not. I know first-hand how frustrating it is to spend time and money trying out a new, yummy sounding recipe, only to follow the recipe exactly as it is written, and discover that it tastes so bad I end up going to bed hungry. Rather than going to bed hungry, I recommend trying a few recipes before your holiday meal as a trial run. If you try a recipe before your holiday event, you will  have an opportunity to decide if you like the recipe and to modify the recipe to fit your taste buds if necessary.
     
     
    Destiny's Gluten-Free/Vegetarian/Vegan/Other Dietary Alternatives  
    Gluten-Free Easter Eggs:

    The following recipe is great for those with dye sensitivities or anyone looking for a natural, healthy alternative to Easter egg dyes. Most Easter coloring kits require vinegar. Be sure to use gluten-free vinegar.
     
    Gluten-Free Vinegar Natural/Food Based Dyes:
    Red and Pink- pomegranate juice, raspberries, cherries, cranberries, red grape juice, and beets, red onions. (less boiling or dying produces a pink color)
    Orange – carrots, chili powder or paprika
    Yellow – turmeric, orange or lemon peels, chamomile tea, celery seed (turmeric does not need to be boiled.)
    Brown – coffee, black tea or black walnut shells
    Green – spinach or liquid chlorophyll
    Blue – blueberries, purple grape juice
    Purple – grape juice or blackberries, concentrated grape juice, violet blossoms, and hibiscus tea
    Gold - curry powder, yellow delicious apple peels, dill seeds
    Deep yellow- soak eggs in turmeric for a long time
    Teal- Soak eggs in turmeric solution for 30 minutes and then cabbage soak for 5 seconds.
    Bright Blue- Soak eggs in cabbage solution overnight (or just for a long time)
    Red/Pink-less boiling or dying produces a pink color

    Instructions:
    To begin, boil your eggs and when they are cool, store them in your refrigerator until you are ready to dye them. Alternatively, you can boil eggs with dye or cold dip, for 5 seconds up to overnight, and dry on wire wrap.
    To make each dye, bring water, vinegar, and color element to a boil, lower the heat, simmer 30 min and strain dye. Please note, you will need a separate base for each primary dye color you make.
    The rule of thumb for the dye is to use four cups of chopped fruit, vegetable or plant material to four cups of water. Add two tablespoons of vinegar. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 15 to 30 minutes (depending on how intense you want the colors).
     
    Eggs colored in natural dyes generally have a dull finish and are not glossy. If you want your eggs to look glossy,  rub them with cooking or mineral oil after they dry.
    Keep your eggs refrigerated until it's time to hide them or eat them.
    Caution: Food safety experts recommend not eating eggs that have been sitting at room temperature for more than two hours.
    Gluten-Free Quick-Check:
    Watch out for hidden gluten-ingredients,(caramel color, natural and artificial flavors or colors, etc) Keep your hands clean Host Easter brunch Make sure all of your kitchen equipment is clean and free of gluten contaminates Bring gluten-free Easter candy & snacks to share If you buy prepared meats, check with the manufacturer to make sure they are gluten-free Trust yourself. If you think something might make you sick, don't take any chances Above all else, have fun!
     
     
     
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/09/2012 - Subway stores in Oregon are in the process of rolling out gluten-free sandwich buns and gluten-free brownies as regular menu items statewide, according to Subway spokesperson Cathie Ericson.
    For millions of Americans who avoid gluten, due to celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating out can be a constant challenge. Having easy access to a safe, tasty, low-cost gluten-free sandwich is like the Holy Grail for some of those folks. For many, being able to grab a gluten-free Subway sandwich would be a major step toward vanquishing the challenges of eating gluten-free.
    Subway understands that being gluten-free "…really cuts down on fast-casual dining options, particularly sandwiches,” said Michele Shelley, Subway board member and owner.
    Many people were excited to read about Subway's early testing of gluten-free products in selected areas. Many were equally excited to hear about Subway's commitment to getting their gluten-free sandwich offerings right, from start to finish.
    For example, Subway’s wheat-free sandwich rolls and brownies are produced in a dedicated gluten-free facility and are individually packaged. Subway staffers are trained to prevent cross-contamination during the sandwich-making process.
    Moreover, a single employee will prepare a gluten-free sandwich order from start to finish. Other features to Subway's gluten-free process include single-use knives and eliminating contact between traditional sandwich rolls and other ingredients including meat, cheese and vegetables.
    Oregon is one of a handful of states where Subway first tested gluten-free products in selected areas. The current statewide roll out in Oregon comes after a successful test in Bend and Portland, Subway restaurants, and seems to signal Subway's desire to offer gluten-free menus to diners.
    “Subway is known for being a leader in healthy fare, and we are excited to embrace these gluten-free menu items for those who can benefit from them,” Shelley told reporters.
    Source:

    http://community.statesmanjournal.com/blogs/menumatters/2012/01/27/oregon-subways-add-gluten-free-menu-options/

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/16/2014 - More than half of U.S. chain restaurants plan to expand their gluten-free menus in the next year, according to a national menu price survey by restaurant supply-chain co-op SpenDifference.
    "Operators recognize that a growing number of customers have health-related dietary restrictions, and they are revamping their menus to include choices for them, as well as for those who simply want more healthful choices,” said SpenDifference president and CEO Maryanne Rose.
    Currently, 55 percent of restaurants surveyed serve gluten-free menu items. According to the new survey, the majority of those businesses will be expanding that selection in the coming year.
    The survey supports projections that indicate that the demand for gluten-free menu items “will be with us for a long time," said Rose.
    The findings are included in SpenDifference's third menu price survey, which for the first time asked chain-restaurant operators about their plans to offer more healthful menu options.
    Read more at: Fastcasual.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2015 - And the biggest gluten-free diet cheats are? Men.
    According to a recent survey commissioned by U.K.-based gluten-free bread company Newburn Bakehouse, gluten-intolerant men feel stigmatized by their dietary restrictions, which leads them to cheat on their diets far more commonly than women. 
    The survey showed that 36 percent of U.K. men sensitive to gluten in food regularly cheat, even though cheating can have adverse health consequences.
    Moreover, one in five of those surveyed said they believe a gluten-free diet is “not for real men.”
    This makes for some fairly large numbers of male gluten-free diet cheats.
    Studies by the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research show that about 6 percent of the U.S. population suffers from some degree of gluten intolerance, while about 1 percent has celiac disease.
    How about it? Do you or any males you know have celiac disease or gluten intolerance? Do you or they cheat of a regular basis? Share your thoughts below.

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