• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,618
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Leet
    Newest Member
    Leet
    Joined
  • 0

    The Safe and Confident Manufacture of Gluten-Free Foods


    Paul Smith

    This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Celiac.com 10/30/2009 - The major concern in producing gluten and allergen-free foods is always that of cross contamination. In my view, the only safe way to produce gluten-free meals and products is in a rigorously controlled and totally gluten-free environment where all ingredients are strictly gluten-free and all benches, utensils and equipment, etc. are dedicated and remain in a totally gluten-free condition at all times. It must always be remembered that gluten-free should mean “ totally and absolutely gluten-free,” and that there should always be an uncompromising zero tolerance for any form of gluten contamination, no matter how slight.

    In my view the same approach should be adopted for anaphylaxis inducing ingredients like peanuts, eggs, sesame seeds, shellfish and crustaceans: that it is best to exclude them entirely to eliminate the risk of accidental contamination. Any other approach requires extremely alert and well informed operators in combination with elaborate cleaning and testing protocols; all of which are prone to mistakes and failure.

    It is my view, that many people are too cavalier in their approach to the matter of gluten contamination, taking the attitude that “a little won’t hurt.” Many manufacturers, particularly restaurants, small bakers and pizza makers etc., for example, are often asked about making gluten-free products and see this as a means of expanding their businesses. Something many of them attempt without properly trained staff and without fully understanding the implications and risks of undertaking such a project. However, there are also many worthy exceptions to this comment: the difficulty is in finding them.

    In flour and bakery situations gluten is always present and is often used as an ingredient. Typical suburban bakeries tend to have flour and hence gluten everywhere. Flour and gluten are insidious and can float in the air for many hours after use and can be dislodged by banging doors and draughts. Benches, tins, trays, dough rollers, dough dividers, bread slicers, utensils, belt ovens etc., are often contaminated with gluten and many of these items are difficult to clean thoroughly. Bakeries are inherently difficult to keep clean and maintain in a gluten-free state.

    Deep fryers are also fraught with difficulty. For example, potato chips which are gluten-free by definition, can easily be contaminated with gluten from the gluten residues left in the deep fryer by cooking such products as crumbed calamari, veal schnitzel, chicken schnitzel, spring rolls, battered fish and the like in the same deep fryer. The only way to produce gluten-free potato chips is by having and maintaining an exclusively gluten-free deep fryer where only gluten-free batters and crumbs etc., are used. Extreme care must also be taken with bench surfaces and all utensils, aprons, towels etc., used and in washing hands.

    Other contentious areas are colorings, flavorings, salad dressings, thickeners, gravies, sauces, for both savory and dessert applications, as these often introduce gluten contamination to otherwise gluten-free meals and foods. If already applied to a meal these can never be fully removed by attempting to scrape them off. The meal should always be totally replaced with a sauce or whatever free meal or course.

    In my view, the consumer’s safety and well being should always be paramount: the consumer should not be imposed upon and they should be given an informed choice as to what they consume at any time. This is the basis upon which we run our business. Avoidance of all the above problems requires well trained and aware staff working under well informed and aware management in a clean and well controlled environment.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Reminds me of the time an idiot waitress at Outback Steakhouse tried to tell me all their flour was gluten-free. Amazed I said, "Oh, you use only rice flour?" "No, it's wheat flour," she replied.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Hi Paul,

     

    Recently I have discovered (and was validated by articles which I read on the internet) that when organic chickens are fed grains - and mostly they are - then if a person is gluten intolerant, eating these chickens can actually make them sick. I discovered this because our local stores ran out of the organic chicken for a couple of weeks and I have never felt better. When I did research I discovered that celiacs and gluten intolerant individuals often get adversely affected by eating poultry and their eggs which was fed grains.

     

    The other thing I discovered is that many people unbeknownst to themselves are allergic to lectins in the food. This is certainly the case with me. People would tell me that they were celiacs and I would t think to myself , If only because my body also doesn't tolerate any of the alternatives. When I read the lectin story, it all fell into place.

    Would you have any comments on the lectins?

     

    Thank you for your article, it also sheds much light on the gluten debate.

     

    Mimi

    ps. I haven't been able to visit your website as the link doesn't seem to be working.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I only wish I could give my family only foods produced in gluten-free facilities. Unfortunately this would greatly reduce the foods available to us.

     

    With so many celiac organizations and the FDA advocating the 20ppm tolerance for gluten, it seems likely to me that we will only see fewer and products produced in dedicated facilities.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest CeliBelli

    Posted

    I whole heartedly agree with Paul on this subject. We must continue to push the US Congress and FDA to take the strictest possible approach to use of the term "Gluten Free" on product labeling. I love Trader Joe's, but they have taken a coward's approach in adopting a "No Gluten Ingredients Used" label. This is not only deceptive, it is potentially dangerous to Celiacs who may ingest such products under the mistaken belief they are clean when they are not necessarily. Pressing for a zero tolerance approach is the only way we can assure complete safety for the Celiac community.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Barbara Coots

    Posted

    This article really hit the nail on the head. I couldn't figure out why I would get sick on the weekends. My husband and I were using the same toaster on weekends and even the dust from his crumbs would make me sick. He has become more aware that I need my own cookware, to stay well.

    He bought me a bread machine. I am loving that.

    Thank you for addressing cross contamination.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    Reminds me of the time an idiot waitress at Outback Steakhouse tried to tell me all their flour was gluten-free. Amazed I said, "Oh, you use only rice flour?" "No, it's wheat flour," she replied.

    Hi Hallie

     

    Thank you for your comment. Unfortunately, such ignorance and lack of awareness of the implications on the part of many people handling, preparing and serving food is one of the greatest problems facing the world today. Sadly, there are also many medicos and nurses who still hold the view that a “little†won't hurt you. This is why I intend to continue blogging to get the message out there.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    Hi Paul,

     

    Recently I have discovered (and was validated by articles which I read on the internet) that when organic chickens are fed grains - and mostly they are - then if a person is gluten intolerant, eating these chickens can actually make them sick. I discovered this because our local stores ran out of the organic chicken for a couple of weeks and I have never felt better. When I did research I discovered that celiacs and gluten intolerant individuals often get adversely affected by eating poultry and their eggs which was fed grains.

     

    The other thing I discovered is that many people unbeknownst to themselves are allergic to lectins in the food. This is certainly the case with me. People would tell me that they were celiacs and I would t think to myself , If only because my body also doesn't tolerate any of the alternatives. When I read the lectin story, it all fell into place.

    Would you have any comments on the lectins?

     

    Thank you for your article, it also sheds much light on the gluten debate.

     

    Mimi

    ps. I haven't been able to visit your website as the link doesn't seem to be working.

    Hi Mimi

     

    Thank you for your comment. One of the really big and hot issues today is the lack of understanding of the nutritional, physiological, neurological and psychological implications of the foods we eat and the changes that surrender to a fast/convenience food culture has wrought in them. Problems that are exacerbated by the narrowing, for economic reasons, in the range and selection of foods consumed and by the fact that so many of us have abdicated from any responsibility over what we eat.

     

    It is undoubtedly true that the flavour and nutritional quality of what we eat often reflects what the animals and plants are respectively fed on and fertilised with. Grass fed beef has a completely different flavour and texture to the sweeter, softer grain fed beef. Free range chickens have a completely different and stronger flavour than grain/lot fed chickens. Similarly with fish. From my own experience in keeping and feeding various types of poultry, it is possible to change the flavour, texture, colour and nutritional quality of their flesh and egg yolks. For example, poultry should never be fed on cabbage, onion and garlic. Partially feeding goats and sheep on full fat soy grits, for example, positively increases the quantity and quality of their butter fat as well as enhancing the quality, fineness and glossiness of their fleeces. We have also found that the soy fat enhances the coats of horses and the glossiness of poultry feathers. Interestingly, observing our poultry we found that while they liked and enjoyed the soy they ate it sparingly. They seemed to instinctively realise it was a high protein intake and they did not over indulge.

     

    While not certain, I am prepared to believe that animals fed on wheat, oats, barley, rye, triticale and spelt may end up with gluten in their protein structures which may adversely affect the consumer. This is certainly an area that requires more investigation and comment.

     

    Lectins are an interesting topic. They are cell agglutinating and sugar specific proteins which are present in all plants and foods. They are currently being widely researched. Like wheat, dairy, gluten, peanut, seame and soy proteins they can be allergenic and may, depending upon their source and the individual consumer's body chemistry and blood group type, have either beneficial and/or adverse health impacts. Some lectins have been found to “bind†with various bladder, breast and laryngeal cancers. Peanut agglutinin has been found to inhibit the proliferation of cultured breast cancer cells, possibly heralding a new less intrusive form of treatment. Similarly soy agglutinin has been used experimentally for purging human bone marrow cancers. However, “bound†lectins can also mimic natural hormones to, for example, produce persistent insulin – like effects. Other lectins have been adversely implicated in various food allergy/intolerance, asthma, bacterial histamine and cancer problems. We still have much to learn.

     

    Regarding the website. We have been working on bringing it to air in full E-commerce guise. We have also been optomising it, testing and photographing recipes and we are preparing to launch a much broader range of gluten free products. The site is coming on line and will evolve and develop considerably in the coming months.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    I only wish I could give my family only foods produced in gluten-free facilities. Unfortunately this would greatly reduce the foods available to us.

     

    With so many celiac organizations and the FDA advocating the 20ppm tolerance for gluten, it seems likely to me that we will only see fewer and products produced in dedicated facilities.

    Hi Pam

     

    We have deliberately chosen to have a dedicated gluten free site and product range for strategic and marketing reasons. It very clearly differentiates our business. In the process, we have surrendered other lucrative work and put some noses out of joint. However, we now have many customers beating a path to our door who appreciate what we have done. We believe that over time more people will follow our example, particularly the hospitality industry which is having difficulty coping with the rising numbers of food allergy and intolerance issues. For example, we are in the process of assisting to transform a restaurant into a totally gluten free venue by providing gluten free ingredients, sauce bases, flours, dips, bread premixes and the like. Most of the customers have not noticed the difference. The proprietor's wife and about 15 – 20 % of the customer base are coeliac and/or gluten sensitive. Dr Rodney Ford, a world authority and pediatric gastro-enterologist resident in Christchurch, New Zealand, fervently believes that within the next decade more than 30 % of the population will be on a gluten free diet due to gluten's increasing implication in a range of chronic health issues including A.D.D., Autism, Coeliac/Celiac Disease, Depression, Eczema, Epilepsy, Gluten Sensitivity, Hyperactivity and Migraines to mention but a few. I agree with him. I believe there is an undeniable correlation between the adoption of a largely wheat/gluten based fast/convenience food culture and the increasing Coeliac/Celiac Disease, Gluten Sensitivity, Diabetes, Thyroid, Obesity and Neurological health issues we are seeing. While there are some individuals who are extremely sensitive to the presence of gluten there are many others who are probably able to tolerate the 20 ppm. However, the jury is still out on this matter. We simply do not have enough collective clinical experience to say so authoritatively, as yet. Personally, I believe the dedicated facility is still the best way to go. We have also applied the same logic to our Kosher and Halal certifications and to dairy, egg, nut and sesame seeds: to anything capable of producing an anaphylactic or severe asthmatic response. We do not need to impose these ingredients and they can all be added by the consumer, if it is safe to so. Do not despair.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    I whole heartedly agree with Paul on this subject. We must continue to push the US Congress and FDA to take the strictest possible approach to use of the term "Gluten Free" on product labeling. I love Trader Joe's, but they have taken a coward's approach in adopting a "No Gluten Ingredients Used" label. This is not only deceptive, it is potentially dangerous to Celiacs who may ingest such products under the mistaken belief they are clean when they are not necessarily. Pressing for a zero tolerance approach is the only way we can assure complete safety for the Celiac community.

    Hi CeliBelli

     

    It is my belief that zero tolerance is the best and only approach and the one that we strictly adhere to. I agree that Trader Joe's approach is an unfortunate compromise. We clearly specify on all orders that all ingredients supplied must be 100% gluten free. Despite our strict gluten free stance, we also carry out routine, random tests of ingredients and finished products as a double check against gluten contamination. Several years ago, one of our products - Vege Salt – registered 8 ppm gluten. We checked the salt and cereal ingredients: they all came up gluten free. We questioned all the herb, spice and vegetable ingredient suppliers about possible gluten contamination. Which they all denied. Aware that someone was lying we had all the vegetable type ingredients tested and found that the celery salt powder in use was approximately 50% wheat starch and contained approximately 50 ppm gluten. This was not disclosed in their specifications and Certificates of Analysis and they continued to deny it even when presented with the documentary evidence. We were extremely annoyed about the rank dishonesty and the wasted time and money. We took our business elsewhere. We bought the pure celery seed powder, we thought we had been buying, from another supplier.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    This article really hit the nail on the head. I couldn't figure out why I would get sick on the weekends. My husband and I were using the same toaster on weekends and even the dust from his crumbs would make me sick. He has become more aware that I need my own cookware, to stay well.

    He bought me a bread machine. I am loving that.

    Thank you for addressing cross contamination.

    Hello Barbara,

     

    I am pleased to have been able to help and highlight this issue for you. As you have found, the cross contamination issue is just as relevant on the home front as it is in a restaurant or other public place. We have a customer with a specially designed kitchen where the wife has her own pantry, toaster, butter, knives etc to avoid any risk of cross contamination. One gluten containing crumb is enough to hospitalise her. I cannot stress the importance of avoiding cross contamination too much. Most people including many of our hospitality industry workers, medicos and nurses fail to realise the importance and meaning of zero tolerance. There is a kind of unthinking attitude that “a little won't hurt you†if not a complete lack of awareness of the consequences. Fortunately, this is slowly beginning to change. We also find that in many families the whole family adopts a gluten free diet to avert the difficulties of preparing multiple meals and cross contamination issues. We have been doing a lot of work to develop gluten free breads, sauces, batters, gravies etc that are indistinguishable from if not better tasting than the generally accepted mainstream products to facilitate this process and to generally help overcome the rising difficulties with food allergens facing the hospitality industry. These new products include our bread mix as previously mentioned, as well as a Burger pattie premix called Burger Surprise and its hot and spicy cousin aptly named Hot and Spicy Burger Surprise and last but not least two breakfast porridge items one called Vita Elm the other Soy Crunch. These products will be available around the end of January/early February from our online store glutenfreehealth.com.au. If you would like I can arrange some more information for you.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest katie berry

    Posted

    Hooray! You are 100% correct and I REALLY, really wish our FDA and Codex understood how important this is. Who are they to inadvertently tell us that up to 20ppm is safe? When that amount certainly gets us sick! In fact, I am suffering right now from symptoms because of some Red Pepper Flakes my husband used to make our dinner on Monday that come from a spice company who calls their spices 'Gluten Free' but with the disclaimer that they have gluten in the facility AND they don't practice cross contamination prevention!!! Wow!! How irresponsible and insensitive. And we don't eat out AT ALL in our town because of the ignorance to Zero Tolerance of gluten.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    I am 60 years old. An Architect and Landscape Architect by training, graduating in both in 1974. I have an MBA (Master of Business Administration Degree) from Melbourne University in 1990. My family have owned FG Roberts (a gluten free/soy products factory in Melbourne Australia) for 54 years. I have been employed by the company full time since 1980 in various technical, management, operational, product development, research and marketing roles. My Web site is: www.glutenfreehealth.net

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   13 Members, 1 Anonymous, 589 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/18/2009 - Little did the parents of 17-year-old Brianna Rice realize that her February diagnosis for celiac disease would make her into a poster child for insurance reform. That's because when Brianna was first diagnosed, she was covered by health insurance. Thanks to some extra scrutiny by her insurance company, that is no longer the case.


    In the months following her diagnosis, Brianna's insurance company, American Community Mutual Insurance, took a microscope to her medical records and canceled her policy after it ruled that her parents had lied on her application last November.

 American Community not only canceled her policy, effective in May, but also denied coverage all the way back to November 1st, 2008, the day Brianna's coverage began.
    After Brianna was diagnosed with celiac disease in February, American Community initiated a review of her medical files and found instances of dizziness, elevated cholesterol levels, ongoing fatigue and a persistent cough. The family received a letter from American Community dated 12 May announcing their choice to rescind coverage.


    The letter stated that "coverage you applied for would not have been issued for Brianna if we had known this medical history at the time of application."
    

Dale Rice claims the firm cherry-picked the instances from different doctors' visits, and that Brianna had no ongoing health issues. He noted the dizziness to was due to a brief bout with dehydration, the fatigue a result of Brianna staying up late surfing online, and the elevated cholesterol due to an inaccurate test, and said her cough was short-lived.
    
The Rices insist they were honest and forthcoming on Brianna's application and say American Community is trying to back out of covering their daughter because of the February diagnosis.

American Community claims it would not have granted coverage based on Brianna's full medical record.
    
The Rices have lodged a complaint with the Illinois Department of Insurance. "We are livid," said Dale Rice, who, along with his wife, is out of work. "When a private insurer gets legitimate claims and seeks to find excuses not to pay them, they are clearly demonstrating morally and ethically bankrupt behavior."
    Insurance companies look for "anything that they could say 'you didn't tell us about,'" says Rice. "They hope that people just lay down and die and don't fight."
    The Rices are not alone. The director of the Illinois Department of Insurance, Michael McRaith, notes that his department has investigated about 400 rescission-related cases industry-wide since 2005. He calls the rate at which customers have complained about American Community 'alarming,' and calls American Community Mutual's rescission numbers 'cause for concern.' 


    The family's situation shows just how quickly health insurance problems can lead to financial ruin. With their daughter's unpaid medical bills exceeding $20,000 and mounting, the Rices fear losing their home. Brianna's mother, Pat Rice says she has liquidated some of her retirement account to pay bills.


    "The next step is really bankruptcy," her husband said.
    This story should strike a nerve with everyone who has celiac disease, or knows someone who does. I wonder how many people with celiac disease might risk cancellation of their insurance if they lost their jobs?  How many people who obtain insurance in good faith, and later find they have celiac disase, risk being with a 'pre-existing' condition label? It seems to me that a crafty insurance company could make an argument that nearly all celiac disease is 'pre-existing,' especially in older people.
    Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.
    Source: Chicago Tribune


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/09/2013 - A legislator in Missouri, Rep. Vicky Englund is pushing a bill that requires manufacturers and wholesalers of hygiene products like shampoo and conditioner to clearly state on the product label whether or not the product contains gluten.
    According to CBS St. Louis, Rep. Englund was moved to act after hearing from a constituent who suffers from gluten intolerance.
    The woman had got gluten "out of her diet completely, but was still very ill and almost died,” Englund said. After considerable detective work, the woman eventually discovered that her shampoo contained gluten.
    A study by the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and another by George Washington University show that many commercial health and beauty products contain gluten. The latter study, done in 2012 showed that people gluten sensitivity could react negative reactions to ingredients such as the wheat germ oil often used to produce Vitamin E.
    Englund’s bill is currently pending before the state’s House Health Care Policy Committee. What do you think? Is this a good idea? Let us know what you think about mandating gluten status on shampoo and conditioner labels by sharing your comments below.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/18/2014 - A recent report from NPR highlighted the challenges for people with celiac disease who turn to local food banks for relief.
    Many food pantries simply do not stock dedicated gluten-free items for celiac sufferers. Those that do try to meet the needs of their gluten-free clients face daunting challenges.
    Some basic math can help to put the problem into perspective. About one-percent of Americans, or about 3.5 million people suffer from celiac disease. Assuming these folks use food banks at the same rate as other Americans, then, at any given time, one in seven, or about 500,000 of them will rely on food banks for nourishment.
    Now, a number of food pantries are making efforts to collect, sort and distribute gluten-free items for people with celiac disease. However, their challenge is compounded by the fact that people with celiac disease are not solely concentrated in cities, where food banks may be more equipped to stock specialty gluten-free foods.
    Also, those larger pantries that are located in big cities must, by definition, serve larger numbers of people with celiac disease.
    For example, if we apply the numbers to the Phoenix metro area, with a population of 4.3 million people, about 600,000 people would require food pantry assistance at any given time. That would mean that pantries like the Foothills Food Bank would need to stock food for about 6,000 people with celiac disease on any given day.
    To their credit, Foothills Food Bank in Phoenix prioritizes donated gluten-free items for people with celiac disease. But keeping enough food on their shelves is a constant challenge, and keeping specialty items, such as gluten-free food requires considerable effort.
    So, while relief agencies like Food Bank of WNY in Buffalo, NY, try to educate soup kitchens and pantries about the importance of providing gluten-free items, they face an uphill battle that goes beyond their normal challenges of simply providing food.
    One bright spot for gluten-free eaters in need of assistance is Pierce’s Pantry in Massachusetts, which has dedicated a page on its website to helping people nationwide to find emergency gluten-free food.
    With these stark realities facing both food banks and celiac sufferers in need of food assistance, please consider reaching out to your local food bank to make a donation of gluten-free food, especially during the holiday season.
    Here’s a link to Pierce’s Pantry Gluten-free Food Resource Page.
     

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.