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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/22/2009 - Is celiac disease sidelining the cherished CEO of one of America's iconic companies?
    Recent news that Apple CEO Steve Jobs will be stepping down from his duties, at least temporarily, has fueled speculation both online and in mainstream media about both his condition and his prognosis, in addition to sending Apple shares tumbling downward.
    Jobs announced in early January that he was suffering from a "hormone imbalance that has been robbing [him] of the proteins [his] body needs to be healthy," and which has led to dramatic weight loss. The announcement stated that Jobs' condition was due to a "nutritional problem" for which treatment is "relatively simple and straightforward."
    Apple announced in mid-January that Jobs was taking medical leave through June. The SEC recently announced that it will undertake a review to ensure that investor notification of the health disclosure was timely and forthcoming. Still, the larger question remains: What ails Steve Jobs, and how will it effect Apple?
    A number of people have speculated that Steve Jobs might be suffering from the effects of untreated celiac disease. Type the terms "Steve Jobs" and "celiac disease" into Google and you will get about 7,000 results.
    In his piece in the Motley Fool, Tim Beyer notes that, according to sources cited by The New York Times, Jobs is suffering not from a recurrence of pancreatic cancer but from a condition that is "preventing his body from absorbing food." Beyer goes on to state: "I've said before that his condition sounds like celiac disease and I still believe that."
    Jobs underwent an undisclosed procedure for a pancreatic tumor in 2004. Whipple surgery,  a common treatment for Pancreatic cancer, involves removing portions of the stomach, pancreas, bile duct and small intestine, and can interfere with digestion and nutritional uptake, even years later.
    However, more than one doctor has pointed out that Jobs' description of the condition seems a bit confusing. Dr. Robert Lustig of UCSF Medical Center says that the statement "doesn't make a lot of sense." He goes on to point out that "[t]here are three medical threads that run through this e-mail, but unfortunately those threads don't make a very strong cable."
    When asked if celiac-related hyperthyroidism might be explain Jobs' symptoms, Dr. Lustig noted that celiac disease does interfere with the body's ability to uptake nutrients, but that celiac disease is a digestive order, not the result of a hormone imbalance. Moreover, there is no single condition wherein a hormone imbalance and protein deficiency can be treated with a simple dietary change.
    Still, thyroid problems, both hyper- and hypothyroidism are common in people with celiac disease. Untreated celiac disease can cause intestinal damage, and prevent proper absorption of nutrients, including protein, leading to weight loss. Hyperthyroidism can cause hormone imbalance.
    When asked if it was possible that Mr. Jobs' explanation had conflated two conditions, celiac disease, which would rob his body of proteins, and would also require a "nutritional therapy," together with hyperthyroidism, which would cause a "hormone imbalance," Dr. Lustig conceded that such a scenario was possible, but he declined to speculate upon the likelihood.
    Dr. Lustig did point out that even if celiac disease and hyperthyroidism were at the root of Mr. Jobs' symptoms, that "neither celiac nor hyperthyroidism has anything to do with his previous pancreatic chromaffin cell tumor."
    However, such a scenario would certainly dovetail with Jobs' statement, and would also explain the relatively "simple and straightforward" nature of the treatment; even related hyperthyroidism would be easily controlled with drugs (usually Methimazole).
    In fact, if celiac disease and hyperthyroidism is at the heart of the problem, Mr. Jobs will likely face a very positive prognosis, as they are both treatable conditions. By following a simple course of drugs for hyperthyroidism, and by adopting a gluten-free diet for celiac disease, Mr. Jobs would be looking at a recovery period that would put him back in the saddle in just a few months, or around June, just the time he's scheduled to return to his duties at Apple.

    Robert Lustig, M.D. is with the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology at UCSF, and speaks on behalf of the Hormone Foundation, which is the public outreach arm of the Endocrine Society. Dr. Walter Willett is chair of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.
    References:
    Apple letter from Steve Jobs:
    http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2009/01/05sjletter.html Motley Fool: Apple Out of a Jobs - Tim Beyers
    http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2009/01/15/apple-out-of-a-jobs.aspx TIME: What's Ailing Steve Jobs? Medical Opinion Varies - Tiffany Sharples
    http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1869975,00.html Bloomberg: Apple Disclosures About Jobs Said to Face SEC Review (Update4) - David Scheer and Connie Guglielmo
    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=aDL78iMCdOzk Thyroid Problems Often Seen with Celiac Disease:
    http://www.healthcentral.com/ibd/news-275806-66.html


    Paul Smith
    This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 10/30/2009 - The major concern in producing gluten and allergen-free foods is always that of cross contamination. In my view, the only safe way to produce gluten-free meals and products is in a rigorously controlled and totally gluten-free environment where all ingredients are strictly gluten-free and all benches, utensils and equipment, etc. are dedicated and remain in a totally gluten-free condition at all times. It must always be remembered that gluten-free should mean “ totally and absolutely gluten-free,” and that there should always be an uncompromising zero tolerance for any form of gluten contamination, no matter how slight.
    In my view the same approach should be adopted for anaphylaxis inducing ingredients like peanuts, eggs, sesame seeds, shellfish and crustaceans: that it is best to exclude them entirely to eliminate the risk of accidental contamination. Any other approach requires extremely alert and well informed operators in combination with elaborate cleaning and testing protocols; all of which are prone to mistakes and failure.
    It is my view, that many people are too cavalier in their approach to the matter of gluten contamination, taking the attitude that “a little won’t hurt.” Many manufacturers, particularly restaurants, small bakers and pizza makers etc., for example, are often asked about making gluten-free products and see this as a means of expanding their businesses. Something many of them attempt without properly trained staff and without fully understanding the implications and risks of undertaking such a project. However, there are also many worthy exceptions to this comment: the difficulty is in finding them.
    In flour and bakery situations gluten is always present and is often used as an ingredient. Typical suburban bakeries tend to have flour and hence gluten everywhere. Flour and gluten are insidious and can float in the air for many hours after use and can be dislodged by banging doors and draughts. Benches, tins, trays, dough rollers, dough dividers, bread slicers, utensils, belt ovens etc., are often contaminated with gluten and many of these items are difficult to clean thoroughly. Bakeries are inherently difficult to keep clean and maintain in a gluten-free state.
    Deep fryers are also fraught with difficulty. For example, potato chips which are gluten-free by definition, can easily be contaminated with gluten from the gluten residues left in the deep fryer by cooking such products as crumbed calamari, veal schnitzel, chicken schnitzel, spring rolls, battered fish and the like in the same deep fryer. The only way to produce gluten-free potato chips is by having and maintaining an exclusively gluten-free deep fryer where only gluten-free batters and crumbs etc., are used. Extreme care must also be taken with bench surfaces and all utensils, aprons, towels etc., used and in washing hands.
    Other contentious areas are colorings, flavorings, salad dressings, thickeners, gravies, sauces, for both savory and dessert applications, as these often introduce gluten contamination to otherwise gluten-free meals and foods. If already applied to a meal these can never be fully removed by attempting to scrape them off. The meal should always be totally replaced with a sauce or whatever free meal or course.
    In my view, the consumer’s safety and well being should always be paramount: the consumer should not be imposed upon and they should be given an informed choice as to what they consume at any time. This is the basis upon which we run our business. Avoidance of all the above problems requires well trained and aware staff working under well informed and aware management in a clean and well controlled environment.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/18/2010 - Should you be unlucky enough to find yourself in jail and also find yourself angered by the dearth of gluten-free food choices, DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT write a note to jail staff in which you threaten to "start blowing up buildings and killing everyone" when you get out, as Geoffrey R. Yates, 27, is alleged to have done recently in Seattle's King County Jail.
    The reason it's a bad idea to express your anger by making bomb threats is because the authorities tend to take you at your word, or at least feel that the matter warrants further investigation, if not prosecution.
    For Yates, a convicted killer already jailed for violating his parole on a manslaughter conviction on a 2001 slaying, that means felony charges after telling King County Jail staff that he was planning a murderous rampage in part because his dietary concerns -- he claimed to need wheat-free food -- weren't being addressed in jail.
    In the note, Yates, 27, allegedly threatened to "start blowing up buildings and killing everyone" if he were released.
    That means Yates will likely spend a lot more time in the very same King's County Jail that seems to have little or no ability or inclination to address the gluten-free complaints that led to his threats in the first place.
    So, one more time. Bomb threats: Bad way to get released from jail. Bad way to get gluten-free food in jail. Bad way to do pretty much anything except get in trouble.
    Source:

    Seattle PI

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/02/2015 - Officials at UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center have warned 179 people that a fairly routine endoscopy procedure may have left them exposed to a drug-resistant 'super-bug' that infected seven patients, and may have contributed to two deaths. The possible exposures occurred at the UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center, between October and January, in patients who underwent a procedure in which a specialized endoscope is inserted down the throat to diagnose and treat pancreatic and bile duct diseases.
    Officials said in an official statement that hospital staff had been sterilizing the scopes according to the manufacturer's standards, but was now using "a decontamination process that goes above and beyond manufacturer and national standards."
    Meanwhile, hospitals across the United States have reported exposures from the same type of medical equipment in recent years, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said it was working with other government agencies and manufacturers of the scopes to minimize risks to patients.
    The FDA says recent medical publications and adverse event reports associated multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in patients who have undergone ERCP with reprocessed duodenoscopes, "even when manufacturer reprocessing instructions are followed correctly."
    The multidrug-resistant bacterial infections include carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) such as Klebsiella species and Escherichia coli.
    The FDA says that from January 2013 through December 2014, they received 75 medical device reports involving about 135 patients related to possible microbial transmission from reprocessed duodenoscopes. "It is possible that not all cases have been reported to the FDA," the agency says.
    Given the fact that celiac disease diagnosis and follow up care require the use of endoscopy, this news is particularly disturbing to those in the celiac community.
    Source:
    Medscape.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.