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    UK Prisoner Simon Benson Hangs Self in Gluten-free Food Row


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/06/2013 - In more downbeat gluten-free news, a convicted murderer was found hanged in his cell at UK's Maidstone Prison, allegedly after his demands for gluten-free meals were rejected.


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    Image: CC--GeeJoPrisoner Simon Benson, who is Jewish, and who was serving a sentence for stabbing a man to death, had been receiving given kosher food since his transfer to the town centre jail two months ago. However, he insisted his meals should also be gluten-free.

    The prison has refused to comment on reports claiming that officials denied Benson's request because he had no medical documentation to justify receiving gluten-free meals.

    Guards found Benson suspended in his room at around 7.30am last Wednesday.
    Emergency personnel rushed him to Maidstone Hospital, where he was placed on life support until around 9.10 pm, when doctors decided with his family to remove him from the life support machine.

    A Prison Service spokesman said: "As with all deaths in custody, the Independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman will conduct an investigation."

    On Monday, officials opened an inquest into Benson's death, which they then adjourned. The medical cause of death was given as suspension.

    A prison spokesman would not comment on reports Benson had been on hunger strike, or that he had a history of self-harm.

    As to any role that the denial of gluten-free food might have played in the incident, stay tuned for updates on the inquiry.

    Source:


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    Lots of people who need to eat a gluten-free diet have not been officially diagnosed for one reason or another. In my case I had been gluten-free for 3 months before testing due to intestinal symptoms so the test came back negative, and I was simply not willing to eat gluten again just for an official diagnosis when after going gluten-free my unpleasant symptoms disappeared. I am also not willing to have a colonoscopy because of the damage that is frequently caused by this procedure. I have been free of symptoms now for almost 2 years. There is also the problem of false negatives as I've heard that the tests are not very reliable.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 02/27/2006 - Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) applauds McDonald’s for providing proof that their French fries are safe for persons with celiac disease and gluten intolerances, states Cynthia Kupper, RD, Executive Director of GIG. Kupper, who has worked with large corporate chain restaurants for many years to provide gluten-free menu options, states McDonald’s took the best action possible by having the fries tested by one of the leading independent laboratories in food allergens. McDonald’s has provided the reassurance those persons with celiac disease need, to feel confident they can eat the fries without getting sick. Outback Steak House was the first large restaurant chain Kupper worked with to develop gluten-free menus. “We definitely made some new friends!” stated Thomas C. Kempsey, Director of Culinary for Cheeseburger in Paradise, speaking of the gluten-free menu Kupper helped the chain launch in February. Cameron Mitchell’s Fish Market, Bone Fish Grill, Carrabba’s, Bugaboo Creek, and many others have worked with GIG to develop gluten-free menus. The program has been very successful for restaurants involved with GIG’s outreach project, states Kupper. The patrons are happy and the restaurants see a growing number of loyal customers.
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    Unlike other acute allergies, such as peanut allergies, celiac disease is a chronic condition that can cause damage to the intestines, malabsorption and malnutrition by eating gluten (proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and hybrids of these grains). Celiac disease is a life-long disease that can be diagnosed at any age. The only treatment for the disease is the strict avoidance of gluten. Celiac disease affects nearly 3 million people in the US and 1:250 people worldwide, yet it is the most misdiagnosed common disorder today.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/12/2009 - At a time when nearly every sector of the economy is suffering, the market for gluten-free foods is strong and promises to grow at 15%-25% well into the next decade, according to market research company Mintel.
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    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 03/29/2010 - For many cultures, Easter represents the most important religious feast of the year. In biblical terms, it represents a celebration of Christ being resurrected. Yet, for those of us unable to digest gluten, it is yet another holiday reminding us of all the foods we can't eat.  Many of us that are gluten sensitive, myself included, spend so much time focused on the foods we can't eat, that it's easy to lose sight of all the wonderful foods still available to us. The fact is,  most of our favorite foods are still safe to eat with a little modification of course.
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    Easy Gluten-free Gravy Mixes Gluten-Free Desserts:
     
     
    Linzertorte Frozen Desserts Frozen Pies Easter Candy:
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    Destiny's Gluten-Free/Vegetarian/Vegan/Other Dietary Alternatives  
    Gluten-Free Easter Eggs:

    The following recipe is great for those with dye sensitivities or anyone looking for a natural, healthy alternative to Easter egg dyes. Most Easter coloring kits require vinegar. Be sure to use gluten-free vinegar.
     
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    Yellow – turmeric, orange or lemon peels, chamomile tea, celery seed (turmeric does not need to be boiled.)
    Brown – coffee, black tea or black walnut shells
    Green – spinach or liquid chlorophyll
    Blue – blueberries, purple grape juice
    Purple – grape juice or blackberries, concentrated grape juice, violet blossoms, and hibiscus tea
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    Bright Blue- Soak eggs in cabbage solution overnight (or just for a long time)
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    Instructions:
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/06/2015 - The Kellogg Co. has announced the launch of Eggo Gluten Free Waffles in both original and cinnamon flavors.
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    Source:
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    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
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    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.