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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/08/2007 - On May 30th, federal judge Elaine E. Bucklo dismissed key parts of a lawsuit against McDonalds regarding the gluten-free status of their famous French fries.
    The case, In Re McDonalds French Fries Litigation (MDL-1784), was brought in February 2006, by two Florida plaintiffs on behalf of their autistic daughter who allegedly suffered ill effects from eating McDonalds French fries. At the time, the company claimed that the French fries were gluten-free.
    The lawsuit claimed in part that McDonalds "failure to disclose the fact that their French fries contained gluten constitutes deceptive, unfair, unconscionable, misleading and fraudulent trade practices," and that "McDonalds unfairly and unjustly profited from their conduct. The judge dismissed claims of fraud, breach of implied warranty, and a request for injunctive relief, but left intact two counts, breach of express warranty and unjust enrichment.
    In its arguments for dismissal, McDonalds claimed that most of the plaintiffs legal causes of action were barred as a matter of law. Basically, McDonalds asserted that the plaintiffs pled themselves out of court by arguing facts that undermined their own claim.
    The plaintiffs fraud allegations were rejected because they failed to meet the specificity required under the federal rules. McDonalds argued that the plaintiffs claim of fraud and misrepresentation failed to state how, when, or where the alleged misrepresentations took place. Federal Rule 9( of Civil Procedure requires that all claims of fraud be stated with particularity; otherwise, they face dismissal.
    Judge Bucklo rejected the plaintiffs claim for injunctive relief because she found there was no threat of future wrongful conduct. The company revised its web site in 2006 to show that its fries and hash browns contain gluten. Also, the publicity brought by the suit arguably eliminated any need for injunctive relief.
    The plaintiffs have 28 days to amend their complaint or the lawsuit will go forward based on the two remaining counts.
    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

    Destiny Stone
    Memorial Day is fast approaching. Once known as, "Decoration Day", Memorial Day commemorates the men and women who have died while serving their Country during military service. Not only is Memorial Day a day of remembrance, it is also a day to spend quality time with your family and loved ones. Most Memorial Day activities center around a picnic, BBQ, or sporting events, so get ready to have a gluten-free Memorial Day!
    If you are gluten sensitive, you will want to make sure your are included in the festivities by preparing gluten-free foods you can eat and share with others. Many of your favorite picnic and BBQ foods are naturally gluten-free, but the condiments and preparation of the dish is what can render your meal inedible. Remember to use gluten-free sauces for your marinades, and avoid using condiments that have been dipped into by gluten laden utensils, as cross contaminates are readily found in jars of mayonnaise and mustard. Keep yourself safe this year and make sure to have your own condiments when going to a group event. Many gluten sensitive people use squeeze tops for their condiments to avoid the proverbial "gluten contaminated knife in the condiments" routine. Included are some Memorial Day tips and recipes, but with a gluten-free twist.

    Gluten-Free Condiments and Marinades Hot Dogs are generally not gluten-free. The fillers they pump into hot dogs usually contain gluten or a sub-ingredient of gluten, such as caramel color, artificial colors or flavors, and even some spices. If you are a hot dog lover, don't despair, there are gluten-free hot dogs on the market. The link below is for all natural gluten-free buffalo hot dogs-check it out!
    Gluten-Free Hot Dogs Don't forget the buns! Being gluten-free doesn't mean you can't enjoy a bun like everyone else-just make sure your buns are gluten-free. You may want to abstain from grilling your buns on the BBQ if there are gluten products on the grill. Try toasting your buns in a clean toaster oven, or putting your buns on a piece of aluminum foil to avoid contamination. There are even some gluten-free buns on the market that are good enough to eat without toasting. The link below is a good place to start looking for gluten-free buns.
    Gluten-Free  Buns Shish kabobs are an all-time favorite at any Memorial Day event. Shish kabobs are easy to make and gluten-free; just make sure to use gluten-free soy sauce and marinades for your kabobs. Here are some ideas for home made, low-fat, gluten-free Shish kabobs.
    Gluten-Free Citrus Tarragon Chicken Kabobs
    1 lemon, zested, then juiced, remainder discarded 1 orange zested, then Juiced, remainder discarded 1 lime, zested, then juiced, remainder discarded 4 cloves fresh garlic, minced  1 tablespoon fresh tarragon leaves 1/4 cup gluten-free soy sauce 1/4 cup olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 pound boneless, skinless gluten-free chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes (use free-range, organic chicken without fillers if possible).
    Gluten-Free Veggie Kabobs
    Bell peppers Onions Cherry tomatoes Mushrooms Italian squash Zuchinni Sweet potato chunks Tofu
    All of the above veggie kabob ideas are optional. Use foods that you like to grill. Make sure your veggies are chunked big enough to hold up well on kabob skewer.

    Gluten-Free Balsamic Vinaigrette (for veggie marinade)
    1/4 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar salt and pepper to taste
    To Make Kabobs:
    Thoroughly mix together all of the citrus-tarragon chicken ingredients (except the chicken) in a bowl. Toss the chicken in the mixture until evenly coated. Cover and marinate in refrigerator for 2 hours. Cut vegetables into bite-size pieces. Puree balsamic basting vinaigrette ingredients in a blender for 30 seconds. Grill kabobs directly over heat source for about 10 to 15 minutes, turning 1/4 rotation every 2 to 3 minutes, or until it's cooked throughout. Gluten-Free Salads and Side Dishes:
    Salads are always a welcome gluten-free side dish, capable of complimenting any meal. To make your Memorial Day BBQ complete, here are some ideas for gluten-free side dishes. These side-dishes are gluten-free, easy and sure to be crowd pleasers-even for the gluten eating folks.
    Old Fashioned Hot German Potato Salad (Gluten-Free)
    Gluten-Free Fruit Salad Recipe
    Don't forget the gluten-free chips and snacks!
    Gluten-Free Chips Gluten-Free Snacks
    Being gluten-free doesn't  mean you can't enjoy a cold beer on Memorial day like everyone else. There are many beer companies that now make gluten-free options. There are quite a few really amazing gluten-free beers on the market, so you shouldn't have to settle for a gluten-free beer you don't like, though you may have to sample many gluten-free beers before you find one that suits your tastes. However, finding a market that carries your favorite gluten-free beer is another issue all together. You may want to discuss options with your favorite grocery store. Many stores will offer to carry products for you if they know you will buy them regularly. The following list of beers are some of the top sellers and can be found at many specialty stores, grocery stores, and liquor stores.Gluten-Free Beers:

    Greens Gluten-Free Beer Redbridge Gluten-Free Beer New Grist Gluten-Free Beer Gluten-Free desserts are certainly not sparse. Although, finding gluten-free, sugar-free, egg-free, dairy/casein-free, corn-free desserts are a bit trickier. Pecan pie is an all American favorite, and no Memorial Day should be without pecan pie. The following pecan pie recipe is raw, and requires no cooking, and contains almost none of the usual food allergens-unless of course you are allergic to pecans.
    Gluten-Free, Dairy/Casein-Free, Egg-Free, Corn-Free, Sugar-Free Pecan Pie
    Ingredients:
    2 cups raw almonds, soaked and drained 35 pitted dates, soaked for 1 hour and drained 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lime juice 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups raw pecans, soaked and drained pinch salt Olive oil, to grease your pan To Make:
    Note: If you are not familiar with the process of soaking nuts, please review the following information before attempting this recipe.
    Soaking Nuts and Seeds After soaking and drying the pecans complete the recipe as follows:
    Combine the almonds and 10 of the dates in a food processor, and process until they are coarsely ground and clumping together. Grease the bottom of a 9-inch square brownie pan or a pie plate with a little cold-pressed olive oil to keep the pie from sticking to the plate. Press the almond-and-date mixture evenly into the bottom of brownie pan and up the sides to form a crust. Set aside. Combine the remaining dates, the fresh lime juice, cinnamon, salt, and vanilla in a blender or small food processor, and process until the mixture has a smooth, uniform consistency. Spread the date filling evenly over the crust. Arrange the raw pecans on top of the date mixture and press lightly. Cut the pie into 2-inch squares and serve.
    Gluten-Free  Quick Check:
    Use a clean BBQ grill or use aluminum foil Use gluten-free condiments Make sure your meat is gluten-free Avoid cross contamination Prepare enough gluten-free food to share
    Happy Memorial Day!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2014 - Congratulations, you’ve begun to eat gluten-free! However, just because a product is gluten-free doesn't mean that it is automatically healthier than gluten-containing counterpart.
    So, before you go patting yourself on the back for embracing gluten-free food, keep in minds that many gluten-free products are no healthier than their gluten-containing counterparts. Like many regular commercial products, many gluten-free foods are hiding one or more of these dirty secrets in plain sight on their labels.
    Many gluten-free products, especially baked goods, are made with high amounts of sugar, salt, refined ingredients, fillers, fats, and even gluten contamination. Here are a few common offenders:
    Sugar—Many gluten-free products are high in sugar. In fact, many gluten-free foods contain more sugar than their gluten-containing counterparts. Salt—To make up for what they lack in flavor, many gluten-free foods contain as much or more salt than their gluten-containing counterparts. Refined ingredients—Just like many regular commercial food products, many gluten-free products are contain highly processed ingredients. Preservatives—Just like many regular food products. Many gluten-free products contain preservatives. Fats—Because gluten-free flours don’t bind with fats the same way as wheat flour does, many gluten-free products, especially baked goods, include vegetable oils or other refined fats to try to mimic their gluten-containing counterparts. This can make them no better in terms of nutrition. Gluten Contamination—In a recent test of grocery products claiming to be gluten-free, a number of products actually showed levels of gluten that were above the federally allowed maximum of 20 parts per million. Check the label, especially with prepared, processed or refined foods. Meantime, I’ll be thinking up a list of examples to go with these categories. Share your own examples or comments below.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/15/2015 - People with celiac disease need to maintain constant vigilance against gluten-exposure. Even those celiacs who avoid gluten need to be on guard against nutritional deficiencies, and to check with their doctor when taking certain drugs.
    Here are five important things to remember about celiac disease:
    Tiny Amounts of Gluten Trigger Big Reactions
    For people with celiac disease, exposure to as little as 30 to 50 mg of gluten (about 1/50th the size of a slice of bread) on any given day can trigger damage to the mucosal lining of the small intestine. Nutritional Deficiencies are Common
    Many people with celiac disease, even those who avoid gluten, suffer from nutritional deficiencies. Doctors recommend that people with celiac disease be monitored regularly for nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamins A, D, E, and B12, carotene, copper, iron, folic acid, magnesium, selenium, and zinc. Doctors recommend vitamin and mineral supplementation, as needed. Bone Loss and Weakness are Common
    People with celiac disease should receive regular screening for osteopenia or osteoporosis. If needed, they should receive calcium supplements to ensure that they are getting the recommended dietary allowance for calcium. Nutritional and Drug Malabsorption are Common
    Gluten reactions cause inflammation in the small-intestine and, over time, damage that decreases absorption of common dietary nutrients, and likely promotes malabsorption of oral drugs or medicines, as well. That’s why it’s important for people with celiac disease to be monitored for proper drug and nutritional levels, and to receive supplements as needed. Celiac Disease Can Impair the Effectiveness of Certain Drugs
    Based on their molecular properties, drugs currently under investigation for their absorption characteristics in gluten sensitivity include acetaminophen, aspirin, indomethacin, levothyroxine, prednisolone, propranolol, and certain antibiotics. Please check with your doctor before taking any of these drugs.

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