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    Unglued: The Sticky Truth About Wheat, Dairy, Corn and Soy


    Sayer Ji

    Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar.

    Were it true that these four foods were health promoting, whole-wheat-bread-munching, soy-milk-guzzling, cheese-nibbling, corn-chip having Americans would probably be experiencing exemplary health among the world's nations. To the contrary, despite the massive amount of calories ingested from these purported "health foods," we are perhaps the most malnourished and sickest people on the planet today. The average American adult is on 12 prescribed medications, demonstrating just how diseased, or for that matter, brainwashed and manipulated, we are.

    How could this be? After all, doesn't the USDA Food Pyramid emphasize whole grains like wheat above all other food categories, and isn’t dairy so indispensible to our health that it is afforded a category all of its own? 

    Unfortunately these “authoritative” recommendations go  much further in serving the special interests of the industries that produce these commodities than in serving the biological needs of those who are told it would be beneficial to consume them.  After all, grains themselves have only been consumed for 500 generations – that is, only since the transition out of the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era approximately 10,000 years ago.  Since the advent of homo sapiens 2.5 million years ago our bodies have survived on a hunter and gatherer diet, where foods were consumed in whole form, and raw!  Corn, Soy and Cow's Milk have only just been introduced into our diet, and therefore are “experimental” food sources which given the presence of toxic lectins, endocrine disruptors, anti-nutrients, enzyme inhibitors, indigestible gluey proteins, etc, don’t appear to make much biological sense to consume in large quantities - and perhaps, as is my belief, given their deleterious effects on health, they should not be consumed at all.

    Even if our belief system doesn’t allow for the concept of evolution, or that our present existence is borne on vast stretches of biological time, we need only consider the undeniable fact that these four “health foods” are also sources for industrial adhesives, in order to see how big a problem they present.

    For one, wheat flour is used to make glues for book binding and wall-papering, as well as being the key ingredient for paper mache mortar. Sticky soy protein has replaced the need for formaldehyde based adhesives for making plywood, and is used to make plastic, composite and many other things you probably wouldn’t consider eating. The whitish protein known as casein in cow's milk is the active ingredient in Elmer's glue and has been used for paint since ancient times. Finally, corn gluten is used as a glue to hold cardboard boxes together. Eating glue doesn't sound too appetizing does it?  Indeed, when you consider what these sticky glycoproteins will do to the delicate microvilli inside our intestines, a scenario, nightmarish in proportions, unfolds. 

    All nutrients are absorbed in the intestine through the microvilli. These finger-like projections from off the surface of the intestine amplify the surface area of absorption in the intestine to the area the size of a tennis court. When coated with undigested or partially digested glue (glycoproteins), not only is the absorption of nutrients reduced leading to malabsorption and consequently malnourishment, but the villi themselves become damaged/dessicated/ inflammed and begin to undergo atrophy - at times even breaking off.  The damage to the intestinal membrane caused by these glues ultimately leads to perforation of the one cell thick intestinal wall, often leading to "leaky gut syndrome": a condition where undigested proteins and plant toxins called lectins enter the bloodstream wreaking havoc on the immune system. A massive amount of research (which is given little to no attention both in the mass media and allopathic medicine) indicates that diseases as varied as fibromyalgia, diabetes, autism, cancer, arthritis, crohn's, chronic fatigue, artheroscerosis, and many others, are directly influenced by the immune mediated responses wheat, dairy, soy and corn can provoke.

    Of all four suspect foods Wheat, whose omnipresence in the S.A.D or Standard American Diet indicates something of an obsession, may be the primary culprit.  According to Clinical Pathologist Carolyn Pierini the wheat lectin called "gliadin" is known to to participate in activating NF kappa beta proteins which are involved in every acute and chronic inflammatory disorder including neurodegenerative disease, inflammatory bowel disease, infectious and autoimmune diseases.

    In support of this indictment of Wheat’s credibility as a “health food,” Glucosamine – the blockbuster supplement for arthritis and joint problems – has been shown to bind to and deactivate the lectin in wheat that causes inflammation. It may just turn out to be true that millions of Americans who are finding relief with Glucosamine would benefit more directly from removing the wheat (and related allergens) from their diets rather than popping a multitude of natural and synthetic pills to cancel one of Wheat’s main toxic actions. Not only would they be freed up from taking supplements like Glucosamine, but many would also be able to avoid taking dangerous Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like Tylenol, Aspirin and Ibuprofen, which are known to cause tens of thousands of cases of liver damage, internal hemorrhaging and stomach bleeding each and every year.

    One might wonder:  “How is it that if America's favorite sources of calories: Wheat and Dairy, are so obviously pro-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and generally toxic, why would anyone eat them?”  ANSWER: They are powerful forms of socially sanctioned self-medication.

    Wheat and Dairy contain gliadorphin and gluten exorphins, and casomorphin, respectively.  These partially digested proteins known as peptides act on the opioid receptors in the brain, generating a temporary euphoria or analgesic effect that has been clinically documented and measured in great detail.  The Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology in Magdeburg, Germany has shown that a Casein (cow's milk protein) derivative has 1000 times greater antinociceptive activity (pain inhibition) than morphine. Not only do these morphine like substances create a painkilling "high," but they can invoke serious addictive/obsessive behavior, learning disabilities, autism, inability to focus, and other serious physical and mental handicaps. 

    As the glues destroy the delicate surface of our intestines, we for the life of us can't understand why we are so drawn to consume these "comfort foods", heaping "drug soaked" helping after helping.  Many of us struggle to shake ourselves out of our wheat and dairy induced stupor with stimulants like coffee, caffeinated soda and chocolate, creating a viscous “self-medicating” cycle of sedation and stimulation.

    As if this were not enough, Wheat, Dairy, and Soy also happen to have some of the highest naturally occurring concentrations of Glutamic Acid, which is the natural equivalent of monosodium glutamate. This excitotoxin gives these foods great "flavor" (or what the Japanese call umami) but can cause the neurons to fire to the point of death.  It is no wonder that with all these drug-like qualities most Americans consume wheat and dairy in each and every meal of their day, for each and every day of their lives.

    Whether you now believe that removing Wheat, Dairy, Soy and Corn from your diet is a good idea, or still need convincing, it doesn’t hurt to take the “elimination diet” challenge. The real test is to eliminate these suspect foods for at least 2 weeks, see how you feel, and then if you aren’t feeling like you have made significant improvements in your health, reintroduce them and see what happens.  Trust in your feelings, listen to your body, and you will move closer to what is healthy for you.

    This article owes much of its content and insight to the work of John Symes whose ground-breaking research on the dangers of wheat, dairy, corn and soy have been a great eye opener to me, and a continual source of inspiration in my goal of educating myself and others.


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    Guest Jo Woodard

    Posted

    Poor threads showing connection to corn and soy. Why mention them, when the article seems to be mainly about wheat and dairy?

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    Guest Julie

    Posted

    Interesting article. I have Celiac Disease, but have also noticed problems with dairy. The whole 'glue' idea evokes a disturbing image...

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    Guest James Dover

    Posted

    Good read. Need more information on problems with corn.

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    Guest Tracee

    Posted

    Great article. I was afraid to try a gluten-free diet for my son at first, have been told such a diet was dangerous. So I researched it to the gills and tried to educate myself on how the GI tract and immune system works. Turns out a high grain and low fat--the politically correct way to eat, was harming me and my son. Turns out I had celiac AND Crohn's. His autism is almost gone thanks to the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, a gluten-free, grain-free diet. We also try to get enough healthy fat in our diet, again that's considered dangerous as well.

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    Guest Oliver

    Posted

    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

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    Guest Colleen

    Posted

    Needs to do way more research. Virtually all plants, and seeds in particular, contain lectins, (author's sticky proteins ?), phytases, anti-proteases, etc. Some are deactivated by cooking. Most raw beans contain so much they are extremely toxic, Meat from animals that eat grain, may also contain these substances, ditto farmed fish, since grain lectins in particular are generally not destroyed in by digestion and may wind up in the meat tissue. Author doesn't mention the need for exogenous digestive enzymes, or the role that enzyme deficiency plays in disease either. Very little is known about anti-nutrients compared to what is known where vitamins and minerals are concerned. Feeding the world is a very big complicated task, and if it is to be successful it is upon all of us to educate ourselves to the maximum, and avoid relying on the "powers that be" for our information.

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    Guest Annie Oakley

    Posted

    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

    "To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need."

    You may want to do some research on lectins, as grains and beans have high levels of the potentially toxic chemicals.

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    Guest Amy Layette

    Posted

    Needs to do way more research. Virtually all plants, and seeds in particular, contain lectins, (author's sticky proteins ?), phytases, anti-proteases, etc. Some are deactivated by cooking. Most raw beans contain so much they are extremely toxic, Meat from animals that eat grain, may also contain these substances, ditto farmed fish, since grain lectins in particular are generally not destroyed in by digestion and may wind up in the meat tissue. Author doesn't mention the need for exogenous digestive enzymes, or the role that enzyme deficiency plays in disease either. Very little is known about anti-nutrients compared to what is known where vitamins and minerals are concerned. Feeding the world is a very big complicated task, and if it is to be successful it is upon all of us to educate ourselves to the maximum, and avoid relying on the "powers that be" for our information.

    I'm sorry to point this out to you Colleen, but the author is not focusing on lectins in this article but the "sticky proteins" known as prolamines. I think this is an excellent introduction to folks who perhaps see no problem with eating large amounts of these gluey foods that contain what may be indigestible proteins. Not sure why you think its so poor?

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    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

    I eat a Paleo diet. I eat fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, fish, and meat. I don't eat an excessive amount of meat and I don't eat eggs.

    I shop at a market to buy produce cheap, and I probably eat between 5 and 8 pounds of fruit and veg in a day. I buy my meat from a butcher who buys grass-fed beef from a local farmer. I'll have a bit of meat or fish on a salad. I snack on raw nuts, seeds, and dried fruit. There's more variety in that than you think.

    Americans (and others) have no idea how many varieties of fruit and vegetables there are out there. We are fed a certain perception by the rich and powerful who own factory farms.

    Also, there is more than enough food to feed the world right now, probably always, it's a matter of distribution.

    One more note: "Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?" Yes, you get both natural energy and a little protein from raw fruits and vegetables.

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  • About Me

    Sayer Ji is an author (Cancer Killers: The Cause Is The Cure), researcher, lecturer, and advisory board member of the National Health Federation.

    He founded Greenmedinfo.com in 2008 in order to provide the world an open access, evidence-based resource supporting natural and integrative modalities. It is widely recognized as the most widely referenced health resource of its kind.

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    • Maureen and Cyclinglady, Of the foods you listed. . .. I would focus on the Chocolate. Chocolate has Tyramine in it and it could/can cause rashes that  might be confused for DH. Sometimes Tyramine get's confused for/in high sulfite foods as triggers. Here is a great overview article on this topic. http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-red-wine-headache-health-0608-20160525-story.html you might also have trouble with headaches if it tyramine is causing you your trouble. People who have trouble Tyramine might also have trouble with consuming cheeses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2738414/ As for the Milk causing/triggering your DH don't rule Adult onset dairy allergy. While rare it does occur in the literature/research when you search it out. I am including the research here in the hopes it might help you or someone else entitled "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1398-9995.1996.tb04640.x It is generally thought most of grow out of a Milk Allergy at approx. 3 years old. But for some lucky one (I guess) we never do apparently.  (I speak for my friend on this board JMG).  He found out he was having trouble with dairy as an adult better never realized until about 6 months ago. With delayed onset allergies it is often hard to tell if it (allergen) is effecting us because we might not associate it with our dairy consumption because it might happen a day or two latter. See this WHFoods article about food allergens/sensitivies.  It is very long/exhaustive but it is very helpful if you have time to study it in more detail. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?pfriendly=1&tname=faq&dbid=30 I will quote some key points for your information. Symptoms of Food Allergies "The most common symptoms for food allergies include vomiting, diarrhea, blood in stools, eczema, hives, skin rashes, wheezing and a runny nose. Symptoms can vary depending upon a number of variables including age, the type of allergen (antigen), and the amount of food consumed. It may be difficult to associate the symptoms of an allergic reaction to a particular food because the response time can be highly variable. For example, an allergic response to eating fish will usually occur within minutes after consumption in the form of a rash, hives or asthma or a combination of these symptoms. However, the symptoms of an allergic reaction to cow's milk may be delayed for 24 to 48 hours after consuming the milk; these symptoms may also be low-grade and last for several days. If this does not make diagnosis difficult enough, reactions to foods made from cow's milk may also vary depending on how it was produced and the portion of the milk to which you are allergic. Delayed allergic reactions to foods are difficult to identify without eliminating the food from your diet for at least several weeks and slowly reintroducing it while taking note of any physical, emotional or mental changes as it is being reintroduced." Here is their information on Tyramine's. Tyramine "Reactions to tyramine (an amino acid-like molecule) or phenylalanine (another amino acid-like molecule) can result from eating the following foods: Fermented cheeses Fermented Sausage Chocolate Sour Cream Red wine Avocado Beer Raspberries Yeast Picked Herring Symptoms of tyramine intolerance can include urticaria (hives), angioedema (localized swelling due to fluid retention), migraines, wheezing, and even asthma. In fact, some researchers suggest that as many as 20 percent of migraines are caused by food intolerance or allergy, and tyramine intolerance is one of the most common of these toxic food responses." Here is an old thread on tyramine and especially how it can trigger headaches. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/95457-headache-culprit-is-tyramine/ I would also suggest your research a low histamine food diet.  Rashes/hives etc. can be triggered my disregulaton of histamine in the body. The other thing in chocolate that might be causing your problems is Sulfites. Here is a website dedicated to a Sulftie allergy. http://www.allergy-details.com/sulfites/foods-contain-sulfites/ Chocolate bars are on their list of sulfite contaning foods but probably most noted in dried fruits and red wine. Knitty Kitty on this board knows alot about a sulfite allergy. I want to go back to the possible dairy allergy for a second as a possible trigger. . .because it has been established as connected to DH . . .it is just not well known. Here is current research (as I said earlier) most dairy allergies are studied in children but it does occur in approx. 10 pct of the GP unless your of Asian descent where it is much more common. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29555204 quoting the new research from this year on children. "When CMP (Cow's Milk Protein) was re-introduced, anti-tTG increased, and returned to normal after the CMP was withdrawn again." and if adults can also (though rarely) it seem develop "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" (see research linked above) as the research shows  you should at least trial removing dairy from your diet if you haven't already and see if your DH doesn't come back when you re-introduce it. It just takes 15 or 20 years for medical doctor' to incorporate new research/thinking into clinical practice.  And note the research on this happening in adults is 20+ years old and as far I know doctor's . . . are not aware of this.  I know I wasn't until recently and I research things alot of to help myself and my friends. But I know you can't do what you don't know about.  So this is why I am trying to share what I learned so that other might be helped and this research might not  lay hidden another 20 years before doctor's and their Celiac/DH patients become aware of it. And if it helps you come back on the board and let us know so it can help others too! If it helps you it will/can help someone else! if they know it helped you then they will/can have hope it might help them too and why I share and research these things for others'. . . who don't know or don't have time to research this for themselves. I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice. Good luck on your continued journey. I know this is a lot of information to digest at one time but I hope at least some of if it helpful and you at least have a better idea of what in your chocolate could be causing your DH (idiopathic) as the doctor's say (of an unknown cause mild) DH symptom's. Or at least it is not commonly known yet that Milk can also cause trigger (DH) in children and adults who have a Milk allergy undiagnosed. . .because we don't don't typically think  or associate it with adults like maybe we should if we are not of Asian descent. Maureen if this doesn't help you you might want to start a thread in the DH section of the forum. As always  2 Timothy 2: 7   “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included. Posterboy by the grace of God,
    • I hooe you can get some answers with your new GI doc.
    • Many of us deal with doctor issues and diagnosis, you got a really bad draw indeed. Most doctors dismiss Celiac as their is no money in the cure for them IE a gluten free diet and not medications.

      Keep up updated on your new doctor and testing, good to see you finally found one that listens and can help, I got through on doc #5 I think it was.
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