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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    UNGLUED: THE STICKY TRUTH ABOUT WHEAT, DAIRY, CORN AND SOY


    Sayer Ji

    Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar.


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    Were it true that these four foods were health promoting, whole-wheat-bread-munching, soy-milk-guzzling, cheese-nibbling, corn-chip having Americans would probably be experiencing exemplary health among the world's nations. To the contrary, despite the massive amount of calories ingested from these purported "health foods," we are perhaps the most malnourished and sickest people on the planet today. The average American adult is on 12 prescribed medications, demonstrating just how diseased, or for that matter, brainwashed and manipulated, we are.

    How could this be? After all, doesn't the USDA Food Pyramid emphasize whole grains like wheat above all other food categories, and isn’t dairy so indispensible to our health that it is afforded a category all of its own? 

    Unfortunately these “authoritative” recommendations go  much further in serving the special interests of the industries that produce these commodities than in serving the biological needs of those who are told it would be beneficial to consume them.  After all, grains themselves have only been consumed for 500 generations – that is, only since the transition out of the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era approximately 10,000 years ago.  Since the advent of homo sapiens 2.5 million years ago our bodies have survived on a hunter and gatherer diet, where foods were consumed in whole form, and raw!  Corn, Soy and Cow's Milk have only just been introduced into our diet, and therefore are “experimental” food sources which given the presence of toxic lectins, endocrine disruptors, anti-nutrients, enzyme inhibitors, indigestible gluey proteins, etc, don’t appear to make much biological sense to consume in large quantities - and perhaps, as is my belief, given their deleterious effects on health, they should not be consumed at all.

    Even if our belief system doesn’t allow for the concept of evolution, or that our present existence is borne on vast stretches of biological time, we need only consider the undeniable fact that these four “health foods” are also sources for industrial adhesives, in order to see how big a problem they present.

    For one, wheat flour is used to make glues for book binding and wall-papering, as well as being the key ingredient for paper mache mortar. Sticky soy protein has replaced the need for formaldehyde based adhesives for making plywood, and is used to make plastic, composite and many other things you probably wouldn’t consider eating. The whitish protein known as casein in cow's milk is the active ingredient in Elmer's glue and has been used for paint since ancient times. Finally, corn gluten is used as a glue to hold cardboard boxes together. Eating glue doesn't sound too appetizing does it?  Indeed, when you consider what these sticky glycoproteins will do to the delicate microvilli inside our intestines, a scenario, nightmarish in proportions, unfolds. 

    All nutrients are absorbed in the intestine through the microvilli. These finger-like projections from off the surface of the intestine amplify the surface area of absorption in the intestine to the area the size of a tennis court. When coated with undigested or partially digested glue (glycoproteins), not only is the absorption of nutrients reduced leading to malabsorption and consequently malnourishment, but the villi themselves become damaged/dessicated/ inflammed and begin to undergo atrophy - at times even breaking off.  The damage to the intestinal membrane caused by these glues ultimately leads to perforation of the one cell thick intestinal wall, often leading to "leaky gut syndrome": a condition where undigested proteins and plant toxins called lectins enter the bloodstream wreaking havoc on the immune system. A massive amount of research (which is given little to no attention both in the mass media and allopathic medicine) indicates that diseases as varied as fibromyalgia, diabetes, autism, cancer, arthritis, crohn's, chronic fatigue, artheroscerosis, and many others, are directly influenced by the immune mediated responses wheat, dairy, soy and corn can provoke.

    Of all four suspect foods Wheat, whose omnipresence in the S.A.D or Standard American Diet indicates something of an obsession, may be the primary culprit.  According to Clinical Pathologist Carolyn Pierini the wheat lectin called "gliadin" is known to to participate in activating NF kappa beta proteins which are involved in every acute and chronic inflammatory disorder including neurodegenerative disease, inflammatory bowel disease, infectious and autoimmune diseases.

    In support of this indictment of Wheat’s credibility as a “health food,” Glucosamine – the blockbuster supplement for arthritis and joint problems – has been shown to bind to and deactivate the lectin in wheat that causes inflammation. It may just turn out to be true that millions of Americans who are finding relief with Glucosamine would benefit more directly from removing the wheat (and related allergens) from their diets rather than popping a multitude of natural and synthetic pills to cancel one of Wheat’s main toxic actions. Not only would they be freed up from taking supplements like Glucosamine, but many would also be able to avoid taking dangerous Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like Tylenol, Aspirin and Ibuprofen, which are known to cause tens of thousands of cases of liver damage, internal hemorrhaging and stomach bleeding each and every year.

    One might wonder:  “How is it that if America's favorite sources of calories: Wheat and Dairy, are so obviously pro-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and generally toxic, why would anyone eat them?”  ANSWER: They are powerful forms of socially sanctioned self-medication.

    Wheat and Dairy contain gliadorphin and gluten exorphins, and casomorphin, respectively.  These partially digested proteins known as peptides act on the opioid receptors in the brain, generating a temporary euphoria or analgesic effect that has been clinically documented and measured in great detail.  The Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology in Magdeburg, Germany has shown that a Casein (cow's milk protein) derivative has 1000 times greater antinociceptive activity (pain inhibition) than morphine. Not only do these morphine like substances create a painkilling "high," but they can invoke serious addictive/obsessive behavior, learning disabilities, autism, inability to focus, and other serious physical and mental handicaps. 

    As the glues destroy the delicate surface of our intestines, we for the life of us can't understand why we are so drawn to consume these "comfort foods", heaping "drug soaked" helping after helping.  Many of us struggle to shake ourselves out of our wheat and dairy induced stupor with stimulants like coffee, caffeinated soda and chocolate, creating a viscous “self-medicating” cycle of sedation and stimulation.

    As if this were not enough, Wheat, Dairy, and Soy also happen to have some of the highest naturally occurring concentrations of Glutamic Acid, which is the natural equivalent of monosodium glutamate. This excitotoxin gives these foods great "flavor" (or what the Japanese call umami) but can cause the neurons to fire to the point of death.  It is no wonder that with all these drug-like qualities most Americans consume wheat and dairy in each and every meal of their day, for each and every day of their lives.

    Whether you now believe that removing Wheat, Dairy, Soy and Corn from your diet is a good idea, or still need convincing, it doesn’t hurt to take the “elimination diet” challenge. The real test is to eliminate these suspect foods for at least 2 weeks, see how you feel, and then if you aren’t feeling like you have made significant improvements in your health, reintroduce them and see what happens.  Trust in your feelings, listen to your body, and you will move closer to what is healthy for you.

    This article owes much of its content and insight to the work of John Symes whose ground-breaking research on the dangers of wheat, dairy, corn and soy have been a great eye opener to me, and a continual source of inspiration in my goal of educating myself and others.



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    Guest Jo Woodard

    Posted

    Poor threads showing connection to corn and soy. Why mention them, when the article seems to be mainly about wheat and dairy?

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    Guest Julie

    Posted

    Interesting article. I have Celiac Disease, but have also noticed problems with dairy. The whole 'glue' idea evokes a disturbing image...

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    Guest Tracee

    Posted

    Great article. I was afraid to try a gluten-free diet for my son at first, have been told such a diet was dangerous. So I researched it to the gills and tried to educate myself on how the GI tract and immune system works. Turns out a high grain and low fat--the politically correct way to eat, was harming me and my son. Turns out I had celiac AND Crohn's. His autism is almost gone thanks to the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, a gluten-free, grain-free diet. We also try to get enough healthy fat in our diet, again that's considered dangerous as well.

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    Guest Oliver

    Posted

    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

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    Guest Colleen

    Posted

    Needs to do way more research. Virtually all plants, and seeds in particular, contain lectins, (author's sticky proteins ?), phytases, anti-proteases, etc. Some are deactivated by cooking. Most raw beans contain so much they are extremely toxic, Meat from animals that eat grain, may also contain these substances, ditto farmed fish, since grain lectins in particular are generally not destroyed in by digestion and may wind up in the meat tissue. Author doesn't mention the need for exogenous digestive enzymes, or the role that enzyme deficiency plays in disease either. Very little is known about anti-nutrients compared to what is known where vitamins and minerals are concerned. Feeding the world is a very big complicated task, and if it is to be successful it is upon all of us to educate ourselves to the maximum, and avoid relying on the "powers that be" for our information.

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    Guest Annie Oakley

    Posted

    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

    "To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need."

    You may want to do some research on lectins, as grains and beans have high levels of the potentially toxic chemicals.

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    Guest Amy Layette

    Posted

    Needs to do way more research. Virtually all plants, and seeds in particular, contain lectins, (author's sticky proteins ?), phytases, anti-proteases, etc. Some are deactivated by cooking. Most raw beans contain so much they are extremely toxic, Meat from animals that eat grain, may also contain these substances, ditto farmed fish, since grain lectins in particular are generally not destroyed in by digestion and may wind up in the meat tissue. Author doesn't mention the need for exogenous digestive enzymes, or the role that enzyme deficiency plays in disease either. Very little is known about anti-nutrients compared to what is known where vitamins and minerals are concerned. Feeding the world is a very big complicated task, and if it is to be successful it is upon all of us to educate ourselves to the maximum, and avoid relying on the "powers that be" for our information.

    I'm sorry to point this out to you Colleen, but the author is not focusing on lectins in this article but the "sticky proteins" known as prolamines. I think this is an excellent introduction to folks who perhaps see no problem with eating large amounts of these gluey foods that contain what may be indigestible proteins. Not sure why you think its so poor?

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    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

    I eat a Paleo diet. I eat fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, fish, and meat. I don't eat an excessive amount of meat and I don't eat eggs.

    I shop at a market to buy produce cheap, and I probably eat between 5 and 8 pounds of fruit and veg in a day. I buy my meat from a butcher who buys grass-fed beef from a local farmer. I'll have a bit of meat or fish on a salad. I snack on raw nuts, seeds, and dried fruit. There's more variety in that than you think.

    Americans (and others) have no idea how many varieties of fruit and vegetables there are out there. We are fed a certain perception by the rich and powerful who own factory farms.

    Also, there is more than enough food to feed the world right now, probably always, it's a matter of distribution.

    One more note: "Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?" Yes, you get both natural energy and a little protein from raw fruits and vegetables.

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    Guest Trisha

    Posted

    Eat quinoa and kale! Winter squash, tomato sauce, berries fruits and nuts! Are potatoes addictive too?

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    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

    Keep in mind that having 6 billion people on this planet isn't working so well, as you just said, about a 1/4 are starving at any given time.

     

    This article is about health, and what's best for us. Consider it selfish, but again, should there really be 6 (almost 7) billion people?

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    Guest redriverbluesman

    Posted

    Wow! I'm trying to get healthy, lose excessive weight, lift the fog, break my bad eating habits, but there is so much contradiction out there. I've been reading about the pros and cons of so many foods lately that I'm just about ready to quit researching. However, I'm going to "try" and give this a couple of weeks, as suggested.

    I"m going to use beans, lentils, brown rice, miso, sea vegetables, and supermarket fruits and vegetables as my foundation. Usually a foodaholic in the bread/pasta and cheese/cream/butter departments, this can't help but be a beneficial exercise....right?!

    Just finished my first black (usually cream-ladened) coffee, something else I should probably give up but am not biting off more than I know I can chew. I'll try to let you know how it feels.

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    Guest Diana

    Posted

    Speaking from experience as a celiac... there is a lot of truth to this article. Anyone having food allergy problems should take this advice seriously, even if there are starving people in the world. Lets recognize the fact that we are fortunate enough to have prosperity and make strides to be healthier.

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    If you are perfectly healthy perhaps you are the lucky one that can get away with drinking milk and eating wheat, but those like myself that have digestive problems will tell you that eliminating milk and wheat really works, I have not only lost weight but have no digestive problems anymore. So instead of cereal or toast for break I have eggs, sausages, tomato, mushrooms etc and lunch meat and salad, dinner meat and veg, and snack on fruit. I love my new diet, and know I am doing what is right for my body because it works.

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    Right on. And yes, those lectins can get into the meat and eggs and dairy products from animals fed wheat! Paleo is truly the best way to go---grass fed meats, wild caught fish, veggies, fruits, nuts seeds, sweet potatoes. Many celiacs are NOT getting better on the SAGFD---Standard American Gluten Free Diet---it's loaded with lectin infused crap.

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    Guest Terry Obright

    Posted

    I am grossly overweight, insulin dependent diabetic, heart disease have had a quadruple bypass in 2004, and last year had 2 stents and angioplasty on a 3rd vessel, hypertensive, and high cholesterol. have been non compliant in my eating habits and craver carbs. I take a lot of meds and insulin. A chiropractor suggested a no wheat, no corn, no diary diet for me and my grand daughter who has allergies. I was offended and was like that would be cutting everything that brings me pleasure out of my life. Honestly didn't think I could do it, oh and of course I suffer with inflammation seems like every joint in my body hurts most of the time. Reading this article was very enlightening, it makes me angry thinking we have been deceived for so long and forced false information. I will begin to eliminate these from my diet. I accept the challenge.

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    I am grossly overweight, insulin dependent diabetic, heart disease have had a quadruple bypass in 2004, and last year had 2 stents and angioplasty on a 3rd vessel, hypertensive, and high cholesterol. have been non compliant in my eating habits and craver carbs. I take a lot of meds and insulin. A chiropractor suggested a no wheat, no corn, no diary diet for me and my grand daughter who has allergies. I was offended and was like that would be cutting everything that brings me pleasure out of my life. Honestly didn't think I could do it, oh and of course I suffer with inflammation seems like every joint in my body hurts most of the time. Reading this article was very enlightening, it makes me angry thinking we have been deceived for so long and forced false information. I will begin to eliminate these from my diet. I accept the challenge.

    Good for you for accepting the challenge. It will change your life. I need to eliminate wheat, corn, soy, eggs and dairy. Good luck to us both.

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    Guest albert

    Posted

    Wow! Great article. Actually frightens me somewhat; I had been looking for some information on gluten free diets and this answers many of my questions.

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    Guest Luis Vega

    Posted

    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

    I have not eaten meat in a very long time and I am not eating anything with wheat or gluten either, and my health is very good. My only problem was arthritis that is going away very fast since I stopped eating wheat. Meat, wheat, corn and soy are too costly for the environment, for health and for any country's budget.

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    Guest KbnunBeg

    Posted

    I stopped eating wheat three weeks ago. I am 48 and diagnosed with diabetes six months ago. My addiction to wheat vanished in three days. I feel great and know eliminating wheat was the right thing to do. I eat veggies, fruit, meat and drink plenty of water. I have lost weight, real inches all over my body. This really works!

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    Guest Eating Clean

    Posted

    For as long as I can remember, eating healthy has been a way of life for me. Coupled with exercise, I consider myself to be in excellent health. My diet included whole grains, fat-free milk, soy protein shakes, Southwest style salsa (corn is a main ingredient). But also for most of my I was plagued with gastro-intestinal issues (gas, cramping, bloating, irregularity). After having a colonoscopy about 3 years ago, I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease. I was floored! How could this be since I've been such a 'healthy' eater all of my life? I was prescribed medication in which I had to take 4 pills, 3 times a day. It was inconvenient, expensive, and I had all the side effects that made me feel even worse. Well, thank God for the internet. After days and days of clicking and searching for solutions, I came upon some studies that fingered wheat, dairy and soy as being natural irritants to the human digestive system, and contributors to other auto-immune diseases. I started following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet which was developed by a scientist whom was searching for a cure for her daughter's debilitating bouts with Crohn's. Since eliminating wheat, dairy and soy (I still eat a little bit of corn), I have been medication free for over a year, and the symptoms of Crohn's are virtually gone. I am now 48 years old and feel healthier than ever.

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    Okay so what are we supposed to eat then? gluten-free processed foods that have even more chemicals? or maybe just vegetables and raw meat?

     

    never in the history of the world did we ever have 6+ billion people on the earth before. With 1 billion of us starving at any given time, we need to think about more than just our own health.

     

    Corn, soy, and wheat, are VERY productive crops. We need these to feed the world. They may not be "natural" or "what we evolved to eat", but it's better than not eating at all.

     

    True, dairy is not productive enough to feed the world. But meat is even worse. Animal protein is second-hand protein - it takes far more food and land to raise animals than it does to just eat the food. Besides, animals are fed corn, soy, and wheat, anyway.

     

    So what does that leave us with? Fruits and vegetables? Where's the protein and energy in that?

     

    The fact is the world NEEDS corn and soy, and sometimes wheat. We need to stop eating so much meat, dairy, and eggs. To sustain life, grains and legumes are what we need.

    Oliver, did you get the memo?

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    Guest Alex Varga

    Posted

    I'm 50 and have never considered myself an unhealthy person, but I have been reading books on occasion on healthy eating (and in the last 2 to 3 years used the Internet for information) and have followed a healthier diet than most. I have to say, I don't believe everything I read, but this information goes to the top of the list for me with some of the others with other researchers. What I don't know is that if I was making millions of dollars selling these products and knowing it is harmful to people, would I still be selling them? Also, over the many years I have changed what I eat and many times how much of it and at 50, I look great and feel great.

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    Guest Stuart

    Posted

    Read "The China Study" for the real truth about diet, nutrition, health and longevity; the most authoritative book available.

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    Celiac.com 12/05/2014 - To remain healthy, people with serious gluten intolerance, especially people with celiac disease, must avoid foods containing gluten from wheat, barley, and rye. Accordingly, gluten detection is of high interest for the food safety of celiac patients.
    The FDA recently approved guidelines mandating that all products labeled as “gluten-free” contain less than 20ppm (20mg/kg) of gluten, but just how do products labeled as “gluten-free” actually measure up to this standard?
    Researchers H.J. Lee, Z. Anderson, and D. Ryu recently set outto assess the concentrations of gluten in foods labeled "gluten free" available in the United States. For their study, they collected seventy-eight samples of foods labeled “gluten-free,” and analyzed the samples using a gliadin competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. They then calculated gluten content based on the assumption of the same ratio between gliadin and glutenin, testing gluten levels down to 10ppm (10mg/kg).
    They found that forty-eight (61.5%) of the 78 samples labeled gluten-free contained less than 10ppm (10 mg/kg) gluten. Another 14 (17.9%) of the 78 samples contained less than 20ppm (20mg/kg) gluten, in accordance with the guidelines established by the Codex Alimentarius for gluten-free labeling.
    However, 16 samples, over 20%, contained gluten levels above 20 mg/kg, ranging from 20.3 to as high as 60.3 mg/kg. Breakfast cereal was the main culprit, with five of eight breakfast cereal samples showing gluten contents above 20ppm (20 mg/kg).
    The study does not name specific brands tested, nor do they indicate whether tested brands are themselves monitored by independent labs. Still, the results, while generally encouraging, show that more progress is needed to make sure that all products labeled as “gluten-free” meet the FDA guidelines. Until that time, it’s a matter of “caveat emptor,” or “buyer beware,” for consumers of gluten-free foods.

    Source:
    J Food Prot. 2014 Oct;77(10):1830-3. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-14-149.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/07/2015 - Girl Scout Cookie season is around the corner, but this year, if you're hoping to get your hands on some of their delicious cookies, including their gluten-free cookie called Toffee-tastic, you might want to get your smartphone out. 
    That's because the Girl Scouts plans to debut a mobile app and a Web platform that offer scouts the ability to sell cookies online, and allows people who want to buy cookies to locate the cookie booth closest to them, without waiting for a knock on the door, or leaving the purchase to a chance encounter.
    In addition to allowing users to find the nearest Girl Scout cookie booth, including the time, date of cookie sales for each location, the app and web platform also allow users to contact their local Girl Scout council, and to view a complete listing of Girl Scout Cookies available in every Zip code across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.
    While most Girl Scout troops nationwide will be using the app and online platform to sell at least some of their cookies online, troops in Chicago are sticking to a traditional sales model, at least for now. So, will the familiar image of Girl Scouts selling cookies door-to-door, or from street corner tables become a thing of the past? Probably not.
    Traditional methods will likely continue, while the app and web platform will offer a “fun, safe, and interactive space for girls to sell cookies,” and learn “vital 21st-century lessons about online marketing, app usage, and ecommerce.”
    So remember, when you buy some cookies from your local Girl Scouts this year, you're also helping young entrepreneurs to master the latest technology to drive sales.
    Girl Scouts of the USA will debut these newest features of the Girl Scout Cookie Program at the January 2015 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) at the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas.
    Download the app, and find Girl Scout Cookies, gluten-free and regular at girlscoutcookies.org.

  • Recent Articles

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center