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    Wait-List for Pocket Sensor that Detects Gluten in Food


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 11/06/2015 - A San Francisco startup has begun a wait-list for a pocket device designed to allow people with gluten allergies to test quickly gluten levels in their food.


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    Image: CC--Juhan SonlinAccording to the company, 6SensorLabs, the device, called Nima, is a portable, handheld gluten detector that could make dining out safer for people who need to avoid gluten for medical reasons.

    Nima works by loading a half-teaspoon sample of food into a test tube and pop that into a triangle-shaped sensor. To avoid cross-contamination, Nima requires a new disposable capsule for each test.

    The sensor assesses the contents of the capsule, and detects gluten down to 20 parts per million. The device then provides a "yes" or "no" within two minutes. "No" signals that no gluten was detected and that the food is safe to eat, while a "yes" indicates that the food contains gluten.

    The retail price of a Nima starter kit, which includes the sensor, three disposable test capsules, a charging cable and a carrying pouch, will be $249.

    Read more at nimasensor.com.

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    Guest sc'Que?

    Posted

    For the price--and knowing that the capsules are single-use--they should include as many as 50 capsules. (Seriously, THREE? That's barely enough to test the efficacy of the device to the satisfaction of the user! )

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    If this is real and accurate, it's going to be a life-saver! Testing capsules should be sold in bulk packs. I'm going to wait and see what reviewers think first before I buy one, but I am excited for this technology.

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    Guest Rick M

    Posted

    Just watched a PBS news report about this product/unit, here is the link, hopefully it will post...

     

    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/is-it-really-gluten-free-you-could-soon-test-it-table-side/

     

    What comes to my mind as someone with high sensitivity to gluten is a possible false sense of security from such a small sample piece. The Doctor from Stanford that was interviewed had the same concerns as I, sampling just one extremely small side of a meal may not detect gluten that might be on the other. She is afraid that this product may make patients complacent and more pron to getting contaminated.

     

    And if the meal comes out with three sides you're looking at a minimum of 6 minutes to test the entire plate, but in reality it'll probably take 10 minutes.... your food is now ice cold and your friends have all just finished their meals. GOD I HATE CELIAC!!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Scott Adams
    By Jessica Mahood , M.S. Bacteriology
    Celiac.com 09/28/2004 - A very good question: what is gliadin and why does it survive a bath in hot oil? I am a little hesitant to answer because I am not a protein chemist who specializes in such things. However, I was a bacteriologist with many years of exposure to biochemical concepts, so Im probably better equipped than most to give this a go.
    First of all, a protein primer: As someone mentioned, proteins are made up of building blocks. We generally call these amino acids. Sometimes amino acids are represented in the scientific literature as a single letter--you will see something like PQQLL (pay attention to this because it will come up again later). Each of those letters stands for an amino acid that is linked to the next. So, imagine the amino acids to be beads in a necklace. This configuration--the beads of amino acids connected in the necklace--is called the primary structure.
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    There is also the fact that not all proteins have all four of the levels of structure. Some proteins simply exist as a secondary structure or tertiary structure. So, there are many different types of protein structures in nature. Often times, these depend on the job of the protein.
    Hopefully I havent thoroughly confused you by now. Suffice it to say that there are many factors involved in determining the properties of a certain protein. So much so that there are actually a set series of tests that scientists use to classify proteins. It is a very complex discipline.
    Now, back to your original question. Proteins cannot be killed, per se, as they are not alive. HOWEVER, they can be damaged or destroyed. This is a process that is called denaturation. Denaturation can be irreversible, such as when you burn something to a crisp. Its as if you melted the strand of that necklace and all of the shapes that it made were lost. Denaturation can also be somewhat temporary. You denature your hair, to some extent, when you use a curling iron. You are slightly unraveling a higher structure of the hair protein, but it can be righted over time (unless the curling iron is too hot!).
    The ease with which a protein denatures depends on many things. Think back to our necklace. If we have, say, five necklaces clustered together to form a single protein, it would probably take a lot of chemical disruption to fully destroy that protein. However, if we had one tiny necklace twisted up slightly, it would be a lot less work to break it apart. There are many other factors involved in this--the size and charge of the beads, for example.
    Gliadin is a fragment of the protein gluten. Gliadin is NOT a single amino acid. Gliadin is simply a subset of a larger protein. Think of it as one necklace within a jumble of many. According to a Stanford research website (http://www.friedli.com/research/PhD/Predict/discuss.html), gluten has the basic structure of:
    MKTFLILALLAIVATTATTAVRVPVPQLQPQNPSQQQPQ
    EQVPLVQQQQFLGQQQPFPPQQPYPQPQPFPSQQPYLQLQ
    PFLQPQLPYSQPQPFRPQQPYPQPQPQYSQPQQPISQQQQ
    QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQIIQQILQQQLIPCMDVVLQQHNIV
    HGKSQVLQQSTYQLLQELCCQHLWQIPEQSQCQAIHNVVH
    AIILHQQQKQQQQPSSQVSFQQPLQQYPLGQGSFRPSQQ
    NPQAQGSVQPQQLPQFEEIRNLARK
    What do these letters mean? Again, they are amino acids. Each one of those letters stands for an amino acid. Its like a code. If the same letter is used, the same amino acid is in those two parts. Within that larger sequence, you see:
    RPQQPYPQPQPQ
    This smaller list of letters is the amino acid code for gliadin. So just for a start, in denaturing our gliadin, we have to destroy all of the rest of the gluten protein that is around it. The next issue is that this sequence contains the letter Q several times. This letter Q represents the amino acid glutamine. This is probably what the person meant when they said that gliadin was an amino acid. They were most likely thinking of glutamine. In any case, as far as amino acids go, glutamine is fairly large and pretty hearty.
    At this point in time, go to the following website: http://www.chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemistry/bio/aminoacid/glutamin_en.html
    Look at the picture of glutamine next to the name at the top--it looks like a couple of groups of letters connected by black lines. If you look to the far left, you see the letters H2N. A certain chemical process in the body changes that H2N into a different chemical group. This is called deamidation, and you hear about it a lot in reference to the Celiac response. It is the deamidated protein within the gliadin fragment of the gluten protein that is believed to be the big trigger for the antibody response that causes damage. What a mouthful, eh?
    Back to gliadin and hot oil, the original question. Okay, so now we know that proteins are pretty complicated. They can have big structures and lots of chemical interactions. Gluten is such a protein. The gliadin fragment of the gluten protein is tough to get to. You must also destroy the properties of the amino acids in the gliadin fragment to truly nullify the immune-irritating properties of gliadin to Celiacs.
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    Sayer Ji
    Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar.
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    One might wonder:  “How is it that if America's favorite sources of calories: Wheat and Dairy, are so obviously pro-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and generally toxic, why would anyone eat them?”  ANSWER: They are powerful forms of socially sanctioned self-medication.
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    Whether you now believe that removing Wheat, Dairy, Soy and Corn from your diet is a good idea, or still need convincing, it doesn’t hurt to take the “elimination diet” challenge. The real test is to eliminate these suspect foods for at least 2 weeks, see how you feel, and then if you aren’t feeling like you have made significant improvements in your health, reintroduce them and see what happens.  Trust in your feelings, listen to your body, and you will move closer to what is healthy for you.
    This article owes much of its content and insight to the work of John Symes whose ground-breaking research on the dangers of wheat, dairy, corn and soy have been a great eye opener to me, and a continual source of inspiration in my goal of educating myself and others.


    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 07/27/2010 - Many businesses contact us here at Celiac.com, wanting to know how to start a gluten-free business. There are many important things to consider before you open your gluten-free business to celiac and gluten intolerant customers. The following information is intended to help those looking to comply with celiac standards of gluten-free food.
    Start-Up:
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    Contamination & Cross-Contamination:
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    Suppliers:
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    Gluten-Free Certification:
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/02/2010 - About a quarter of people who suffer from celiac disease or gluten intolerance spend a decade or more complaining to doctors before receiving an accurate diagnosis, according to a poll conducted by Coeliac UK.
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    The poll also revealed that nearly 60 percent of the nearly 1,600 poll respondents had also been mistakenly diagnosed with anaemia, without even a follow-up test. Almost six in 10 were misdiagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome.
    Women being to there times more likely to develop celiac disease than men, coupled with 60 percent general misdiagnosis for irritable bowel syndrome means that women are likely being disproportionately misdiagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome.
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    Why do people with gluten intolerance and celiac disease have to wait ten or twenty years or more to get properly diagnosed?
    How long did you have to wait? How did your doctor do with diagnosis? Slow diagnosis? Misdiagnosis? Tell us and we'll be sure to include some of your responses in a follow-up article.
    Source:

    The Daily Mail

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    Christina Kantzavelos
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    Jefferson Adams
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    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
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    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
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    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.