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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    WHY ALL THE HATE FOR CELIAC DISEASE DRUG TREATMENTS?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/18/2015 - That old saw about death and taxes might need a bit of amending to include complaints about pharmaceutical companies working on celiac drug treatments.


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    Photo: CC--Kenny LouieOne interesting facet of our coverage of the development of various drugs to treat and/or cure celiac disease has been the regular presence of comments questioning the motives,and actions of the companies involved.

    It's funny, but no one complains that companies still make money selling aspirin, and that no one has cured a headache, and that there must be some conspiracy to profit off of those who suffer a headache.

    There's no doubt that there's money to be made producing drugs that treat disease. But, if a company can develop and produce a safe drug to protect celiacs against contamination, or to help reduce symptoms, what's wrong with that?

    Just like an aspirin, I can take it or not take it.

    In the old days, ten years ago or more, people with celiac disease generally suffered in silence, with scant gluten-free food choices, and little information. However, in just a decade, we've got a wealth of information, and multi-billion dollar gluten-free foods market and a number of companies developing drugs to treat or cure celiac disease.

    To me, that's a good thing. Still, there are naysayers. Here's a rundown of comments by readers who seem less than enthused about celiac drugs in development.

    Our recent article, An Update on Every Celiac Disease Drug Currently in Development included the comment:

    "Article's fine. Concept's disturbing. Eating a gluten-free diet is the free, already-proven cure for celiac and gluten-intolerance. They don't have to torture mice and likely other animals to find a 'cure' for something that there already is a cure for. I imagine there is $$ for the researchers here and $$ for the animal labs and $$ for the pharmaceuticals."

    Of our article entitled, How Close Are New Celiac Disease Treatments? one reader wrote:

    • "I would be very cautious about taking any of these until it was proven absolutely to have no side effects. There always are some and history has shown some to be deadly."

    Commenting on our article ALV003 Reduces Gluten Damage in Celiac Disease Patients, one reader commented:

    "I only want to know: how long until random internal organs begin to fail or malfunction as a result of yet another new mystery drug? I'd rather starve to death than be a guinea pig for big pharma again."

    Our article on NexVaxx, entitled Is a Vaccine for Celiac Disease Just Around the Corner? included the following comments:

    • "Totally agree with vhill seems like a ploy to poison people with GMO foods that come up with a supposed "'cure'. Eat healthy whole foods this is not a curse its a wake up call to be healthy if you didn't have celiac you'd probably be eating processed crap."
    • Balm wrote: "Thanks but no thanks. I'll remain a celiac and continue to eat healthy. While trying to fix one problem, some will end up with far worse problems."
    • Jonnys wrote: "Stupid idea! Just another way to make more money off of people."

    These are but a few of the largely positive comments we receive, and we hope you enjoyed them as much as we do.


    Image Caption: Big pharma, and celiac drug treatments get a red light from many readers. Photo: CC--Kenny Louie
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    Guest jayknight

    Posted

    I think distrust of the scientific community is markedly high among sufferers of CD—particularly those who continue to have symptoms or attendant disorders. Naturally, we see a lot of folks seeking solace and support on this site and its forum.

     

    To whit: lots of naturopathic remedies and suspicions about cross-reactivity, widespread candidiasis, etc. Generally spurious cures and conditions that are not well researched or proven. Yet these drug trials are trying to become as researched and proven as possible!

     

    Part of the distrust is perhaps due to the fact that treatment and/or resolution is not always achieved with GI doctors, and frustration ensues among patient and physician.

     

    If folks don't trust the drugs, they shouldn't use them. I hope the opinions expressed here don't hinder the research. However I suspect the ratio of "would try" to "no way" swings heavily to the former; we just see a skewed representation here among the poor folks still suffering.

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    Guest Randy Klein

    Posted

    This article misses the bigger question that I have. What if I forget to take my pills like people frequently do who have lactose intolerance? I frequently forget, or have run out.

     

    We are playing with something pretty dangerous here, and there are people who have silent damage who would not know.

     

    Cure it great, control it, big worries.

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    I think what gets me started yelling "Noooo!" is the suggestion that I might make myself sick by eating gluten so that they can test their treatment. I just can't be altruistic about that.

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    They can develop a drug for celiacs but when I listen to the side effects of the drugs for other immune disorders that can't be cured by diet, I find it unlikely that I would take a similar drug. Turning off your immune system, IMO, seems like a supremely bad idea... especially when celiac can be controlled by diet.

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    You should think about doing an article on why people have come to distrust pharmaceutical companies. Maybe that is part of the reason people are hesitant to embrace the search for a celiac drug cure. It's a shame that your article pokes fun at dissenting comments by saying "we hope you enjoyed them as much as we did". Celiecs should try to be understanding of where each other are coming from or we will become a divided group with less of a voice. I'd hope for more from the writers at celiac.com, who should try to exhibit a neutral stance to encourage conversation and make commenters with varied opinions feel welcome.

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    I do not need a drug to "cure" my celiac disease, I eat a gluten free diet and I am fine. However I would like to see our agriculture department make changes to the processing of our corn, wheat and I think a lot of people would feel better. But there is no money to be made for big business, therefore we have to bear the burden of many diseases that could be avoided.

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    Read Dr. Brownstein's article about a new diabetes drug on his blog, and you'll start to understand how scientists lie about pharmaceuticals.

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    Search for "America's Most Admired Lawbreaker" and read the series of articles on Huffington Post and all of the comments, so that you understand the greed and disregard for patients that exists in pharmaceutical corporations.

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    Although I'm not a fan of "the Donald", I have to complement him on speaking out about vaccine injury in the last debate. It is we who suffer the most autoimmunity who have the strongest and most sensitive and reactive immune systems, and thus are most vulnerable to gut and brain damage that results in autism spectrum disorders. Our genes are much older than the cultivation of wheat. Read Sayer Ji's essay "The Dark Side of Wheat". With Dr. Alessio Fasano's and other researchers' discoveries that no human has the enzymes to break gliadin, glutenin and other toxic grain proteins down into usable amino acids, that wheat germ agglutenin attaches to everyone's cartilage and crosses everyone's blood brain barrier, and that there are over 23,000 proteins in modern bread wheat, that it has the complete genome of three different grasses, resulting in a genome that is larger than our own, and Columbia University Celiac Center has discovered five more classes of proteins that celiacs react to, and Dr. Fine's research showing that only 1% of American's do not have a gluten sensitivity HLA-DQ gene, I think we need to be thinking about our role as the canaries in the coal mine, rather than following the USDA recommendations. Read the book "Death By Food Pyramid".

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    Why accuse Pharma companies of just trying to make money off celiacs? Yes, a gluten free diet is healthier by far, but look at the prices we have to pay for gluten free products. Why are the prices so high when the ingredients are rice flour and tapioca starch, both very inexpensive!!! Whose trying to make money and gouge people???

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    Thank you for bringing this up. Last I checked, if you live in America, you can choose to take the new drugs or not take them. I personally will keep my choice to myself and not try to influence others to think like me. I don't really have time to do that. My body, my choice--your body, your choice. Take care of yourself the way you see fit.

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    Guest William Narcowich

    Posted

    The negative comments must come from people who do not travel and probably prepare their food at home. I do not know of any restaurants that serve gluten free breakfasts, only one local restaurant that serves gluten free lunches, and a limited number where gluten free dinners are served. Mostly those are pizza or steak restaurants. Desserts other than vanilla ice cream are rare. It is impractical to find gluten-free restaurants on a long automobile trip.

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    I'm not quite sure I get it either. I haven't read all of the articles you mention, let alone the comments, but you can see some that are fairly indicative of some of the current anti-science bandwagons (anti-GMO, anti-pharmaceuticals, etc.). I think that's your answer right there.

     

    For my part, I'm happy folks are working on this and I hope they come up with something good. The gluten-free diet is a "cure" in one sense (as some of those comments mention), but it's not perfect.

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    You should think about doing an article on why people have come to distrust pharmaceutical companies. Maybe that is part of the reason people are hesitant to embrace the search for a celiac drug cure. It's a shame that your article pokes fun at dissenting comments by saying "we hope you enjoyed them as much as we did". Celiecs should try to be understanding of where each other are coming from or we will become a divided group with less of a voice. I'd hope for more from the writers at celiac.com, who should try to exhibit a neutral stance to encourage conversation and make commenters with varied opinions feel welcome.

    It should go without saying that Celiac.com does not agree with all comments posted, and the comments that are posted don't always represent Celiac.com's viewpoint. Comments on a given article can range greatly from one end of the spectrum to the opposite end of it, and we at Celiac.com do our best to point out issues that we have with some of these perspectives by replying to them, or in this case, writing an article about them.

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    I'm not quite sure I get it either. I haven't read all of the articles you mention, let alone the comments, but you can see some that are fairly indicative of some of the current anti-science bandwagons (anti-GMO, anti-pharmaceuticals, etc.). I think that's your answer right there.

     

    For my part, I'm happy folks are working on this and I hope they come up with something good. The gluten-free diet is a "cure" in one sense (as some of those comments mention), but it's not perfect.

    Amen! I'm ready to have a choice re treatment vs. diet alone for Celiac! Please keep us informed when treatment is available!

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    I don't have time to read through all comments any time you take a drug you run risk of drug reactions or side effects, but for many people a gluten-free diet is not enough, especially the traditional gluten-free diet to heal and remain healthy so I am all for looking and investigating a alternative treatment it's always up to individual to take or not to take it.

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    I for one am excited to see what they come up with. Eating gluten-free is not always enough for some of us with celiac. I still suffer from some ongoing digestive issues. I eat as healthy and clean as I can (organic, etc.), but I would be thrilled to see a cure for celiac or at least a supplement that would help protect against accidental cross-contamination when dining out. It feels good to have hope for the near future!

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    Guest Amy Sutherland

    Posted

    I love scientists who discover ways to improve my health! I also am willing to pay them money for their labor. Mostly, I don't mind eating a gluten free diet, but it is difficult to eat safely away from home. I have been "glutened" twice this year, once at my niece's wedding and once while eating out on our family vacation. In both cases, the culprit was hidden gluten. I can't wait for a pill that I can take when there is a danger of cross-contamination. And as others have said, no one has to use medicine that they don't want to.

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    Guest Fern Walter

    Posted

    EVERY drug on the market today has side effects. I take enough I so I should know. Aspirin can give ulcers. So... If there is a drug out there that can help or even cure me I am so there. And since we are not really even close to a drug that can help or cure my celiac I will not even worry about it right now. If they actually put something on the market then I will decide what to do.

     

    Of course there is money to made in this drug. I wish I could be the one making the money. What other reason would the pharma companies have than to find a cure so they can make lots and lots and lots of money. If I were them I would do the same exact thing. I hope they develop something sooner than later.

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    What depresses me is when people say "there's already a cure, just eat gluten free." Not for everyone! That works for some people, not others. In order to finally get healthy (which I am not yet after nearly three years), I am religiously gluten free to the point of wiping every item that enters the house from outside, eating absolutely no processed foods, walking nowhere near bakeries or flour aisles in grocery stores (yet I've still had multiple gltuenings in grocery stores), not eating in any restaurant that isn't entirely gluten free. I can no longer socialize with people in restaurants, allergies and sensitivities keep me from socializing in most homes (pets, smoke, any scented product). I view my life as on pause until a better treatment comes out. I'll be first in line, any price, I'll take the side effect risks, let me be a guinea pig and test it out!

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    Wow! I didn't expect to see so much negativity. I would love for my daughter to feel safe to go to sleep overs and not worry about getting sick. I'd love for her to sit in the school cafeteria and not be afraid to share her food with friends because if they touch her food with contaminated hands she will get sick. I would love for her to be able to go out on dates in a few years and not have only one restaurant she can go to. Of course I don't want the drugs to harm her, but I sure would love to have them reduce the fear, sadness, and stress she feels in her life right now. Celiac sucks for my middle school daughter. I'm not going to pretend this life style change has been fun for her or for any of us. I am grateful that now that she has been diagnosed she is finally growing, losing her baby teeth, and doing all the physical things her body hasn't been able to do previously. But emotionally this is hard. I don't want her life to always be hard.

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    I am most concerned about the celiac vaccine. If I am having an immune antibody response to certain proteins in grains, but doctors aren't really sure which ones because they don't test thoroughly, how do I know that I won't have an even greater reaction by getting this vaccine? A vaccine causes specific antibodies to be generated and sometimes an adjuvant is added to heighten the immune system's reactivity even more. Since when did someone with an autoimmune disease need their immune system to be even more reactive? Once you get a vaccine, you can't undo it, it's not like stopping a medication with bad side effects. There's no way I would volunteer for the vaccine trial. I am not an anti-vaxer. I work at a veterinary clinic and recommend vaccinations, but not every brand, kind, or disease for everyone. Products vary by manufacturer and not every vaccine is effective enough and/or needed. On the other hand, I would love to have an enzyme that I could take when I eat out. I got glutened from a dirty (with wheat soy sauce) hibachi grill last week when the cook said my order was gluten free. Very little gluten, just cross contamination. I'd like to be protected against that.

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    I would never take a pill to minimize symptoms. An aspirin doesn't make the source of the headache disappear, it merely masks the problem. As with all pharma, risks and side effects are rampant and this one has been rushed to market to fit the "illness of the day." It's delusional to expect that suddenly medical industry is concerned with this issue that has been misdiagnosed, misunderstood and misrepresented for years purely for altruistic reasons. Call naysayers cynical, but we are merely utilizing our past measure of proof.

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    Guest Stephanie

    Posted

    I have celiac. I wouldn't purposely eat gluten. I can't eat anywhere but my own kitchen and it would be nice to spend time with my friends eating out. I would still choose gluten free but it is always cross contaminated . I am gfdfsf, and not better. I have been going to specialists for years. It is human nature for people with negative comments to be the ones who speak up. Complaint departments exist, not complimentary departments . The negative feedback does not reflect how most gluten-free people feel or there wouldn't be any possible drug developments . The feedback did appear to "shoot the messenger . " There are also people who don't like puppies and kittens. It is impossible to please everyone.

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    My son is one of the "super sensitives" He cannot tolerate even the smallest amount of gluten without getting sick. He follows a very strict gluten free diet and is OK with that. Its the accidental glutening that makes life difficult for him. Unless a restaurant is 100% dedicated gluten free, he won't dine out. (there are not in the city where he lives) He pretty much cooks and prepares everything he eats. But he travels a good amount for work and this is always a problem. He is not looking to take a pill and be able to eat wheat products. All he wants is to be able to go out and maybe once in a while, order off a gluten free menu and not have to worry about cross contamination. If there is a medication that can do that for him, that would be wonderful.

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    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/10/2007 - A study published recently in the journal of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics shows that the paracellular permeability inhibitor AT-1001 effectively reduces intestinal barrier dysfunction, proinflammatory cytokine production, and gastrointestinal symptoms in people who have celiac disease. At present, a lifetime devoted to following a strict gluten-free diet is the backbone of current treatment for celiac disease. However, as researchers have come to know more about celiac disease, they’re insights are leading to developments that offer more effective prognosis and treatment of the disease.
    One of those promising new approaches involves treating celiac patients with doses of AT-1001, a paracellular permeability inhibitor that is structurally derived from a protein secreted by Vibrio cholerae. Recently, a team of medical researchers set out to assess the safety and tolerability of 12 mg doses of AT-1001 in people with celiac disease who submitted to acute gluten exposure.
    For the in-patient, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled safety study, researchers looked at twenty men and women with celiac disease and measured intestinal permeability, through fractional excretions of lactulose and mannitol, as an exploratory measure of the efficacy of AT-1001 in treating celiac disease.
    The test subjects were men and women with age ranging from 18 to 59 years old. Each was pre-screened and referred by a gastroenterologist. Each had positive biopsy and antibody screens that indicated celiac disease. Each had also been on a gluten-free diet at least six months, was not known to be IgA deficient, and presented with anti-tTG titres of <10 EU at enrollment.
    Study shows safety and tolerability of 12 mg doses of AT-1001 in celiac disease
    In the placebo group, acute gluten exposure brought an observable 70% increase in intestinal permeability, compared to no change at all in the AT-1001 group. Four of seven patients (57%) of the placebo group showed increased levels of Interferon-gamma levels, but in the AT-1001 group only four of 14 patients (29%) showed such increases. Also, the placebo group showed gastrointestinal symptoms more frequently than the AT-1001 group (P = 0.018).
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    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/30/2012 - A company called Microtest Laboratories is manufacturing doses of what they claim may be the first effective vaccine treatment for celiac disease. At this point, the only treatment for celiac disease is to avoid gluten in the diet.
    Other companies are working on vaccines for celiac disease, and several working trials are underway. However, this new drug's creator, ImmusanT, based in Cambridge says that, unlike other vaccines, which prevent an infection, their drug, Nexvax2 works by changing the immune system so it no longer attacks gluten.
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    Microtest is initially manufacturing 9,000 vials for ImmusanT: two 3,000-dose batches of vaccine and a 3,000-dose batch of inert placebo to be used in the clinical trial. Richter says that the control group contains everything except the active vaccine.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/10/2015 - Of course, a strict gluten free diet is still the only safe and effective treatment for celiac disease. However, new drugs in development, some of which are currently being tested on humans, might allow people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten again, at least in small amounts.
    To be fair, even if all goes smoothly, it will be a few years at least before we see such treatments on the market. Moreover, even though many early results have been encouraging, none have yet entered safety trials, the final step before Food and Drug Administration approval and commercial availability.
    Drugs currently under trial include an enzyme that splits the protein in wheat that triggers adverse reactions, into smaller harmless products, and another which promises to make the gut less leaky, and thus block potentially toxic substances from triggering inflammation.
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    Some of these drugs may be taken right before eating gluten, while others might be more effective when taken on a regular schedule. If approved for use as intended, these drugs will likely allow people with celiac disease to eat gluten in small amounts. To my knowledge, there is no drug in current trial phases that is designed to permit unrestricted gluten consumption.
    So, the good news is that the next few years may see commercially available treatments that might actual help people manage celiac disease. The downside for people with celiac disease, at least for now, is that there is no treatment on the horizon that will allow safe, unlimited gluten-consumption. Moreover, there is no hint that a cure is coming anytime soon.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/21/2015 - Here's every celiac disease treatment currently in development in a single list:
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    ALV003 most recently passed a phase 2 clinical trial, results of which appeared in the June 2014 issue of Gastroenterology. Post-trial biopsies showed that ALV003 prevented intestinal damage in 34 volunteers with celiac disease who ate 2 grams of gluten each day for six weeks and also took the drug. Phase 2b, a 12-week trial, is now underway.
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    Results from a small 2013 study showing AN-PEP to be safe, appeared in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. For the study, 16 people ate 7 grams of gluten every day for two weeks and half of them also ate AN-PEP, and half took a placebo. However, the placebo group did not get sick enough during the course of the study to show that the enzyme had any effect, so further study is under way.
      ActoBiotics by ActoGenX uses Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc.

    Early pre-clinical work with a genetically altered L. lactis secreting a peptide derived from gliadin demonstrated an in vivo suppression of gluten sensitization.

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      BL-7010, by BioLineRx, is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten.

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    BL-7010 has undergone safety testing in humans and was found to be well tolerated. According to BioLineRx, testing will begin in mid-2015 to see if the drug works as expected to diminish gluten's effects on the body.

    However, BL-7010 is designed to protect only against gluten cross-contamination; it won't allow people with celiac disease to eat large amounts of gluten.
      CCR9, by Chemocentryx, is a drug called vercirnon, which is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. CCR9 has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. However, despite the completion of the trial several years ago, no results relating to celiac disease have been made public or published.
      Egg Yolk Enzyme. Little is known about efforts to develop a celiac treatment that uses egg yolk to coat gluten and allow it to pass through the body undetected, thus preventing an adverse gluten reaction in sensitive individuals. Like most other drugs being developed, this treatment would work to prevent reactions to small amounts of gluten, rather than as a cure. 
      Larazotide Acetate by Alba Therapeutics.

    How it works: Larazotide acetate blocks a protein that carries pieces of gluten across the gut, where immune cells can see them. Fasano and his colleagues found that this carrier protein, called zonulin, is overproduced by celiac patients after they eat gluten.

    Results of the most recent phase 2 trial of larazotide acetate, published in February 2015 in Gastroenterology. The volunteers who took the drug experienced fewer days with disease symptoms during the 12 week-long study.
      Nexvax2, by ImmusanT, works much like an allergy shot. Nexvax2 exposes the immune system to gluten in a controlled way so that immune cells that are usually activated get turned off or eliminated.

    So far, Nexvax2 has completed a phase 1 trial showing it to be safe. More research is being done to test whether it is effective.

    Designed to work as a vaccine, Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Similar to allergy shots, the vaccine is designed to reprogram gluten-specific T cells triggered by the patient's immune response to the protein.
      ZED1227 by Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase I clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. The small molecule targets the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to dampen the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process. Stay tuned for updates and progress reports as these drugs work their way through their various trial phases.
    Finally, share your thoughts on all these celiac drugs in the development pipeline. Are you excited, wary, both? Let us know by commenting below.
    Source:
    Gastroenterology Report

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com