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    Will New Guidelines Help Boost Gluten-free Baby Food Market?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 05/27/2016 - Data from scientific studies meant to help clinicians recommend the best time for the introduction of gluten into an infant's diet have been unclear, and this has led to some confusion among parents as to the best policies for when to introduce gluten.


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    Past advice was based on observational studies, but two clinical trials published in the past two years have shown that the age at which gluten is introduced to the diet does not affect overall rates of celiac disease during childhood.

    In response to those recent studies, the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) has already changed its guidance to recommend that infants be introduced to small amounts of gluten sometime between four and 12 months of age. Meanwhile, Sweden's national food agency, Livsmedelsverket, is reviewing recent scientific studies make sure its current advice regarding gluten introduction matches the best current data.

    The new research suggested that "it does not matter when during the first four to 12 months food with gluten is introduced," reads a note on the Livsmedelsverket website. "The new research provides important knowledge about what affects the risk of gluten intolerance," said Ylva Sjögren Bolin, the agency's immunologist and nutritionist.

    These changes could have an impact on the market for baby food, which has seen sales fall recently as more and more parents follow specialized diets for their infant children. In the last few years, more parents have turned to allergen-free foods for their children, which has created a lucrative market for the products, especially in the gluten-free category.

    Exactly how lucrative? About 14% share of the global market was gluten-free in 2014, according to Euromonitor International. Major markets for gluten-free baby food include Russia, Spain and Italy.

    Look for that market share to increase, as "more babies and toddlers are used to gluten-free, and mums believe that gluten-free is a better diet for their kids," noted Mintel's Yannick Troalen.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Scott Adams
    This article comes to us from Karoly Horvath, M.D., khorvath@POL.NET, who is one of the two directors of the celiac center at University of Maryland in Baltimore.
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    This system is the wisdom of nature and this is the way that mothers milk protects babies from all the antigens (infectious agents, toxins etc.) occurring in the environment where the mother lives. These antigens without this protection may enter the body through the digestive or respiratory systems. The best example is that breast milk protects babies from bacteria causing diarrheas in the underdeveloped countries.
    The antibodies are produced by the cells (plasma cells) localized in the gut and the lung. These cells are migrating to the lactating breast-tissue for hormonal trigger (enteromammal plasma cell circle) and they continue producing these antibodies in the breast. These antibodies appear in the breast milk. In brief, the breast milk may contain all the antibodies the mother has in her digestive and respiratory systems. The function of these antibodies is to block the entrance of antigens infectious agents, toxins, allergens etc) across the digestive or respiratory tract of babies.
    In case of celiac disease, it means that if the mother has circulating antibodies to gliadin, these antibodies appear in the milk. If the breast fed baby ingests gliadin (or the mother ingests accidentally and traces of gliadin appear in the milk) the antibodies in the milk blocks the gliadin and it will not able to cross the intestinal wall and meet with the babys immunosystem. Theoretically, the breast-fed infant do not have any immunoreaction to gliadin. If the mother accidentally ingests gliadin during breast feeding it is likely that the concentration of antigliadin antibodies become higher in the breast milk.
    To answer the question: the antibodies in breast milk are protective and do not "trigger" celiac disease in genetically predisposed babies. There are several data showing that breast-feeding has a protective effect in case of celiac disease. Furthermore, it is well documented that breast-feeding in the first year of life decreases the risk of allergies by 50% in babies whose parents have allergies.
    As far as the reaction after weaning concerned: it is also known that babies may have some reaction (loose stool or spit up or discomfort) transiently after introducing a new food, however, this is a temporary symptom and not allergy or immunoreaction to the food. It is likely that their digestive system should accommodate to the new foods.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    The following is a post from Ron Hoggan - Q: I asked the doctor what an inflamed mucosa could mean and he shrugged and then added parasites, maybe? She was tested for parasites way back before her first biopsy (October 96).
    A: Have you tried eliminating dairy? Volta et. al. have demonstrated that 36% to 48% of celiacs tested were also intolerant to milk protein. Borner et. al. have demonstrated sequence homology, from the N-terminal, between casein and gliadin. The other three cited below are also identifying milk protein intolerances associated with celiac disease.
    Playing the odds, exclusion of dairy is most likely to help. But there are other significant dietary allergens that might be eliminated if a dairy free diet, in addition to the Gluten-free diet, doesnt help.
    Borner H, Isolation of antigens recognized by coeliac disease auto-antibodies and their use in enzyme immunoassay of endomysium and reticulin antibody-positive human sera. Clin Exp Immunol 106(2), 344-350 (1996)
    Hvatum M, Serum IgG subclass antibodies to a variety of food antigens in patients with coeliac disease. Gut 33(5), 632-638 (1992)
    Ciclitira PJ, Gliadin antibody production by small intestinal lymphocytes from patients with coeliac disease.Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 89(2-3), 246-249 (1989)
    Volta U, Antibodies to dietary antigens in coeliac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol 21(8), 935-940 (1986)
    Ciclitira PJ, Secretion of gliadin antibody by coeliac jejunal mucosal biopsies cultured in vitro. Clin Exp Immunol 64(1), 119-124 (1986)

    Claire Atkin
    Celiac.com 05/28/2009 - Dr. MariaPorpora and her fellow researchers in Italy studied a woman backin 2003 who had chronic abdominal and pelvic pain, deep dyspareunia(pain while having sex), and dysmenorrhea (menstruation pain similar tocramps). When she came in to Dr. Porpora’s clinic, she also haddiarrheaand had lost five kilograms in the last six months.

    Her painwas so bad that she completely avoided having sex. She measured the severity ofher pain on a one to ten scale, with one being low and ten being high:

    Dysmenorrhea: 10 Chronic pelvic pain: 7 Dysapareunia: 10
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/12/2013 - A number of studies have suggested a connection between infant feeding patterns and the development or clinical expression of celiac disease. However, until recently, it remained unclear whether infant feeding actually affects the occurrence and/or the clinical presentation of celiac disease.
    A recent study that shows important differences in celiac disease rates between two groups of 12-year-olds indicates a possible strategy for preventing celiac disease.
    The notable difference between the two groups was simple infant feeding practices. The study findings suggest that gradual introduction of gluten in small amounts during ongoing breastfeeding provides protection against celiac disease.
    The study was conducted by Anneli Ivarsson, MD, PhD; Anna Myléus, MD, PhD; Fredrik Norström, PhD; Maria van der Pals, MD; Anna Rosén, MD, PhD; Lotta Högberg, MD, PhD; Lars Danielsson, MD; Britta Halvarsson, MD, PhD; Solveig Hammarroth, MD; Olle Hernell, MD, PhD; Eva Karlsson, MD; Lars Stenhammar, MD, PhD; Charlotta Webb, MD; Olof Sandström, MD, PhD; and Annelie Carlsson, MD, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Medical Biosciences, Clinical and Medical Genetics, and Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics at Umeå University in Umeå, Sweden; the Department of Pediatrics in Clinical Sciences at Skånes University Hospital at Lund University, in Lund, Sweden; the Pediatric Clinic of Norrköping Hospital in Norrköping, Sweden, the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine in the Division of Pediatrics at Linköping University in Linköping, Sweden; the Pediatric Clinic of Norrtälje Hospital in Norrtälje, Sweden; the department of Pathology and Cytology of Aleris Medilab in Täby, Sweden; and the Pediatric Clinic of Växjö Hospital in Växjö, Sweden.
    To accomplish their goal, the team crafted a 2-phase cross-sectional screening study of 13,279 children from two separate birth groups: the first born during the Swedish celiac disease epidemic of 1993, and the second born in 1997, after the epidemic ended.
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    Source:
     Pediatrics 2013;131:e687–e694. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-1015

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