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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 06/08/2010 - Paul Seelig of Durham, owner of Great Specialty Products; a bread company that claimed to manufacture gluten-free bread which actually contained gluten and made many people sick, is now facing additional indictments for false murder implications.
    Selling, 48, is facing nine felony fraud charges for selling gluten contaminated bread which he claimed was gluten-free. People began complaining about Seelig's bread products after getting sick from them, which led state state officials to close Seelig's business in January, and arrest Seelig on criminal charges in February.
    In March, State School Board member Kathy Taft was raped and left for dead. She later died, and almost two months after that Jason K. Williford was charged with Kathy Taft's rape and murder. Prosecutors said that Seelig volunteered information about Taft's killer to barter for reducing or dismissing  his felony charges. Seelig implicated a  former co-worker who was entirely innocent, and had no connection  to Taft's murder.
    On Monday, Seelig was expected to plead guilty to his felony charges and accept a plea deal, but he refused. Instead, Wake Superior Court Judge Donald Stephens arraigned Seelig on felony charges, is seeking additional indictments against Seelig for false murder accusations, and at the prosecutors request raised Seelig's bond to 750,000.
    Sources:

    NewsObserver.com News-Record.com

    Dyani Barber
    Celiac.com 04/12/2011 - Paul Seelig was found guilty today of 23 counts of obtaining property by false pretense after a two-week trial in Durham, NC. The jury found that he illegally represented baked goods as gluten-free, but they actually contained gluten. Mr. Seelig received an 11 year prison sentence for his crimes, which included the sickening of more than two dozen customers, one of whom had a premature delivery that was possibly caused by her involuntary gluten consumption.
    Seelig's company, Great Specialty Products, purchased regular gluten-containing items from companies in New Jersey such as Costco, and then repackaged them in his home kitchen and sold them as "gluten-free" at the NC State Fair, various street fairs and via home delivery. Seelig claimed that his baked items were homemade in his company's 150,000-square-foot commercial kitchen, and that his company raised its own grains on its 400-acre farm. High gluten levels were detected by both customers and investigators in Seelig's supposedly gluten-free bread, even though he claimed that he tested his bread weekly for gluten and found none. Mr. Seelig could not produce any of his test results at trial.
    Source:

    http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/04/12/1123724/bread-seller-lied-jurors-find.html

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/28/2016 - An Oregon man who claims to have celiac disease filed another proposed class action suit against General Mills in federal court recently.
    The company recalled nearly 2 million boxes of the cereal last year after what they claimed was a mistake at a local packaging plant. That recall incident has spurred several lawsuits already, which were covered in two previous articles, General Mills Sued Over Recalled Gluten-free Cheerios, and General Mills Sued Again, This Time for Misleading Labels on Gluten-free Cheerios.
    In the latest suit, named plaintiff, Christopher Hamilton, of Marion County, Oregon, individually and for all others similarly situated, filed a class action lawsuit Feb. 29 in U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon Eugene Division against General Mills Inc. and General Mills Sales Inc., alleging violations of the Oregon Unlawful Trade Practices Act and consumer protection statutes in several states.
    Hamilton's suit alleges that General Mills wrongly labels some of its Cheerios as "gluten free.” He claims he purchased a $15.98 twin pack of “gluten-free” original and honey nut-flavored varieties of Cheerios in late September from a Salem Costco that was later subject to recall.
    The complaint states that a test sample of the purportedly gluten-free Cheerios contained 43 parts per million of gluten, which exceeds the 20 parts per million federal limit for a food product to be labeled as gluten free.
    Source:
    Legalnewsline.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 5/23/2016 - Plenty of people have followed the news of the woman who sued Chinese food chain P.F. Chang's, claiming that they discriminated against her by charging more for gluten-free dishes than for other non-gluten-free options.
    Celiac.com covered P.F. Chang's efforts to have the suit dismissed, and also P.F. Chang's failure to prevent the woman from modifying the lawsuit, thus keeping it viable, if only for a time.
    U.S. District Judge Ronald Whyte, of the Northern District of California, had dismissed the original complaint in August, but reinstated the suit once plaintiff Anna Marie Phillips amended her complaint. On Nov. 23, 2015, Whyte ruled that Phillips had sufficiently pleaded her claims in that amended complaint.
    Many in the restaurant industry were watching the suit carefully since it was first filed in December 2014, as the claim of discrimination, based on higher charges for gluten-free items at P.F. Chang's, could have serious repercussions for the industry as a whole.
    Phillips has now asked the judge to dismiss her lawsuit.
    At least for now, the question to whether surcharges or higher charges for gluten-free food options constitute some form of discrimination against those with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, remains un-litigated.
    The position of the Department of Justice is that celiac disease is not a disability in every case, and that there are plenty of cases in which it is not a disability.
    Read more at Legal News Line.

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