Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Celiac Sprue Research Foundation Seeks Volunteers for an Important Study

    Celiac.com 11/25/2003 - Investigators from the Celiac Sprue Research Foundation, a non-profit public charity, and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation are seeking 20 volunteers who have Celiac Sprue to participate in a study called the "Gluten Detoxification Trial". The Gluten Detoxification Trial will test the effects of consumption of an Orange Juice Mixture that has been modified by the addition of gluten pre-treated with an enzyme (PEP) that is intended to "detoxify" the gluten. If the PEP is successful in detoxifying the gluten, then the stage will be set for development of a PEP therapeutic drug, or pill, that may allow Celiac Sprue patients to consume a regular gluten containing diet.

    The study involves 2 two-week stages, separated by one month off. The first stage will occur during the first two weeks in December. The second stage will occur during late January 2004. Participants in this study will be randomized to consume an Orange Juice Mixture containing gluten daily for 14 days during one stage, and an Orange Juice Mixture containing gluten pre-treated with the PEP daily for 14 days during the other stage. Participants will record symptoms daily during each stage, and will have laboratory tests measured before and after each stage. Participants will undergo a screening physical exam at the beginning, and brief follow-up exams after each stage at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation.

    Participants in the Gluten Detoxification Trial must meet all of the following criteria:

    • Diagnosed with Celiac Sprue by small intestinal biopsy (participants must be able to provide a copy of the biopsy report).
    • Have had at least one abnormal Celiac antibody test (e.g. transglutaminase (ttg), endomysial (EMA), anti-gliadin) in the past.
    • Be in remission on a gluten-free diet.
    • Be at least 18 years of age.

    Pre-registration is required to participate in the study. If you can participate, please contact the Celiac Sprue Research Foundation at the above address or e-mail address and request a registration packet/consent.

    Please call either Dr. Gail Pyle at (408) 655-0384 or Dr. Gary Gray at (650) 327-1144 if you have any questions.



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I was going to do as it says in this article please contact the Celiac Sprue Research Foundation at the above address or e-mail address and request a registration packet/consent. but it is nowhere clear what address or email address is being referred to.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 12/31/2002 - Long time celiac and intestinal disease researcher Kenneth Fine, M.D. brought the benefits of his research discoveries, and his medical experience and knowledge to the public through the Internet at www.finerhealth.com, www.enterolab.com, and through a nationwide commitment to lecturing celiac support groups at no charge. Now Dr. Fine has found a new way to serve gluten sensitive individuals and their support organizations: through music!
    Dr. Fine has been a singer-songwriter/guitar player for many years and recently recorded 25 of his original songs in a recording studio with professional studio musicians. These songs are now available on two CDs. After much thought and prayer about how to incorporate more music into his life and how to share it with the public, Dr. Fine has decided to let his musical creativity join his medical professional mission in the sense of working to serve the public. Therefore, he has decided to donate all proceeds from music celiac disease sales to support the not-for-profit public health organization he started in 2000, The Intestinal Health Institute (http://www.intestinalhealth.org), and to support other service organizations as well. The first public service organization he has chosen to support is Americas Gluten Sensitivity support organizations and their local support groups. "My life is fully committed to public service, and I want as many people as possible to enjoy the wonderful health that I, and hopefully you, have experienced since adopting a gluten-free and health-oriented lifestyle. I believe that happiness through music (or by any means) is an important part of health," says Dr. Fine.
    Dr. Fine is offering his music CDs to local celiac support groups to sell as a fund raiser. He also plans musical performances as benefit shows with other music recording artists, and is putting together a group of professional musicians willing to work in a spiritual light to share their musical gifts with the world for a healthy cause. Although Dr. Fine will be bringing his musical hobby to the public in this way, his professional health work, i.e., heading the Intestinal Health Institute and EnteroLab laboratory, public speaking, answering the publics email inquiries, helping people individually by phone, and doing medical research and scientific publishing, will continue unabated. About the name he has chosen to use for his music, Dr. Fine offered this; "To ensure that my desire to share my music with the public does not interfere with my ability to carry out my public health mission, I have opted to use my biblical name, Jude, for my musical last name." Thus, you can peruse his musical web site, read the stories behind his lyrics, and hear song clips at http://www.kennyjude.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/20/2011 - Over his five years as a participant in Project Bread’s annual Walk for Hunger, 16-year-old high school sophomore, Pierce Keegan came to realize that more needed to be done to supply gluten-free food to people in need.
    “When I was doing the Walk for Hunger, I suddenly thought, ‘What if I needed food? Would I be able to get gluten-free products if I couldn’t afford them?’’’
    Inspired by his success in raising nearly $5,000 for Project Bread, Keegan founded Pierce’s Pantry to supply gluten-free food to people who need food, and need that food to be gluten-free.
    Pierce's Pantry officially launched on January 1st, 2011, and  collects and distributes gluten-free products to local food pantries. Keegan has so far received donations from 12 food manufacturers, and collected nearly 800 pounds of gluten-free food.
    The Acton Food Pantry in Boxborough is the first food service to make Keegan’s gluten-free products available to clients, and has also agreed to provide emergency bags of gluten-free food for those in need.
    “I’ve been fortunate enough to eat and have access to gluten-free food,’’ said Keegan, “but there are many celiacs out there who can’t afford it, and have to make choices between either eating unsafe foods or not eating at all.’’
    Keegan wants to eventually expand Pierce’s Pantry nationwide, and eventually to accommodate other food allergies.
    ’“The Acton Food Pantry told me about this woman they gave a whole bag of gluten-free products to and the woman started crying,’’ said Keegan. “It showed me that this could really make a difference, after hearing how just one bag of food changed another person’s life so drastically.’’
    Read more or donate to Pierce's Pantry.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/18/2013 - New tests and new histological criteria for diagnosing celiac disease, along with changing perspectives on the disease's natural history are causing a number of researchers to question past prevalence estimates for celiac disease.
    A team of researchers recently set out to establish a more accurate estimate of celiac disease rates by using a new serogenetic method.
    The research team included Robert P Anderson, Margaret J Henry, Roberta Taylor, Emma L Duncan, Patrick Danoy, Marylia J Costa, Kathryn Addison, Jason A Tye-Din, Mark A Kotowicz, Ross E Knight, Wendy Pollock, Geoffrey C Nicholson, Ban-Hock Toh, Matthew A Brown and Julie A Pasco.
    They are variously affiliated with the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, the Department of Medical Biology at the University of Melbourne, the Department of Gastroenterology at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne Health in Parkville, Australia, ImmusanT Inc., One Kendall Square, Building 200, LL, Suite 4, Cambridge, MA, USA, the School of Medicine at Deakin University in Geelong, Australia, Healthscope Pathology in Melbourne, Australia, the Human Genetics Group at the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Level 5, Translational Research Institute in Woolloongabba, Australia, Endocrinology at Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Herston, Australia, the NorthWest Academic Centre of the Department of Medicine at The University of Melbourne in St Albans, Australia, Geelong Gastroenterology, Level 1, in Geelong, Australia, the Rural Clinical School at the School of Medicine of The University of Queensland in Toowoomba, Australia, and Roche Diagnostics Australia, in Castle Hill, Australia.
    The researchers assessed human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ genotype in 356 patients with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease.
    They did the same for two age-stratified, randomly selected community groups of 1,390 women and 1,158 men, who served as controls. They tested and screened all patients for celiac-specific serology.
    They found that only five patients with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease lacked the susceptibility alleles HLA-DQ2.5, DQ8, or DQ2.2, and four of these patients had been misdiagnosed. HLA-DQ2.5, DQ8, or DQ2.2 was present in 56% of all women and men in the community cohorts.
    Transglutaminase (TG)-2 IgA levels were abnormal in 4.6% of the community women, and in 6.9% of the community men. Composite TG2/deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) IgA/IgG were abnormal in 5.6% of the community women and in 6.9% of the community men.
    But in the screen-positive group, only 71% of women and of women and 65% of men possessed HLA-DQ2.5, DQ8, while 75% of women and 63% of men possessed DQ2.2.
    Medical review was possible in 41% of seropositive women and 50% of seropositive men, and led to biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in 10 women (0.7%) and 6 men (0.5%). Based on relative risk for HLA-DQ2.5, DQ8, or DQ2.2, celiac disease affected 1.3% of men and women with positive TG2 IgA screens, and 1.9% of women and 1.2% of men with positive TG2/DGP IgA/IgG screens
    Serogenetic data from these community cohorts indicated that testing screen positives for HLA-DQ, or carrying out HLA-DQ and further serology, could have reduced unnecessary gastroscopies due to false-positive serology by at least 40% and by over 70%, respectively.
    Requiring biopsy confirmation based on TG2 IgA serology leads to substantial underestimations of the community prevalence of celiac disease.
    Testing for HLA-DQ genes and affirmative blood results could reduce the numbers of unnecessary gastroscopies.

    Source:
     BMC Medicine 2013, 11:188. doi:10.1186/1741-7015-11-188

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/01/2014 - I sometimes have to remind myself that it’s the 21st century, and that some amazing scientific breakthroughs that sound like something out of science fiction are, in fact, real.
    Take for example the technology, recently developed by researchers at the University at Buffalo, that allows researchers to safely examine intestines using nanoparticles. The popular name for these orally administered nanoparticles suspended in liquid is ‘Nanojuice.’
    Human small intestines are each about 23 feet long and 1 inch thick. Located between the stomach and the large intestine, the small intestine is notoriously difficult to examine, hence procedures like biopsies, endoscopies, etc.
    The new technique, being developed by researchers at the University at Buffalo, uses nanoparticles and lasers to image the organ. Once the nanoparticles reach the intestines, doctors can strike the particles with a harmless laser. The technique provides real-time view of the intestine. This will help doctors diagnose irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, Crohn's disease and other gastrointestinal illnesses, according to the researchers.
    So far, the research team has only tested their technology on mice, but they plan to refine the technique for clinical trials on human subjects. Researchers say that this method can help doctors get a better picture of the nature of celiac and other diseases.
    The study is published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
    What do you think? Will products like nanojuice represent the future of celiac disease diagnosis? If it is shown to be safe, would you prefer it to a biopsy?
    Source:
    Natureworldnews.com

  • Popular Contributors

  • Forum Discussions

    Hello Everyone, Hope this finds you well. I'm wondering if anyone knows of a compassionate and caring Doctor may it be Functional or Medical etc. in the Vancouver area? I have contacted the Celiac groups, however they are not allowed to release names. Thank you kindly in advance for your time. Happy Healing.  
    All of Schars products are gluten-free.  They don’t make any that are not.
    Yes, I had to stop eating Schar bread because I was getting sick on it all the time. I believe if I am not mistaken (it has been a long time) the Artisan line does not. I received this tip from someone else, and I don’t know if it is accurate but it seemed to help me, at least. 
×
×
  • Create New...