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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Could An Italian Patent Change Gluten-free Food World Forever?

    Celiac.com 07/17/2014 - Italian researchers are claiming a major scientific and potentially commercial breakthrough that could lead to a revolution in the food available to people with celiac disease.

    Image: Wikimedia Commons--FlankerThe researchers, all at the Department of Agricultural Sciences, Food and the Environment, University of Foggia are claiming that their revolutionary new method will enable the manufacture of wheat products safe for people with celiac disease. The method method involves modifying the gluten proteins in standard wheat so that it will not trigger an adverse gluten reaction in people with celiac disease.

    They claim that their method enables the production of celiac safe and gluten-friendly foods containing “all the dough and baked products made with flour from commonly obtained wheat.”

    A patent has been made by Prof. Aldo Di Luccia and Prof. Carmen Lamacchia, and CNR researcher Dr. Carmela Gianfrani. The application was filed in Italy with the Italian Patent and Trademark Office at the Ministry of Economic Development, on 2 October 2012. An application for extension according to the International Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) was filed on 29 April 2013.

    Both researchers have earned a very positive evaluation by the award of the higher threshold of the so-called "scientific credibility".

    Specifically, they claim that their method induces changes in gluten proteins, which break the chain of chemical combinations that trigger the so-called "intolerance" changes, thus avoiding the inflammatory process that interferes with nutrient absorption, and causes lesions and bowel dysfunction.

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    What is the effect on baked goods made with this wheat. If it is altered so that it does not perform the same as regular wheat with gluten that produces all that great bread we are missing - then what is the point ??

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    Guest Celiac in Maine

    Posted

    What is the effect on baked goods made with this wheat. If it is altered so that it does not perform the same as regular wheat with gluten that produces all that great bread we are missing - then what is the point ??

    I agree dappy, after reading this research what is the point? I wonder, does this author proof-read? I am continually disappointed in this author's articles. They are (as is evidenced in the last paragraph) usually convoluted and hard to decipher. I'm sorry, but: "Specifically, they claim that their method induces changes in gluten proteins which break the chain of chemical combinations that triggered after the ingestion of certain foods that contain gluten in fact, cause the so-called "intolerance": changes , as mentioned, in fact avoid counterproductive the inflammatory cascade that creates lesions and bowel dysfunction in the absorption of nutrients..." makes little sense.

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    Guest Susan Kyhn, MS

    Posted

    I was unclear as to whether this is a method of genetic engineering or a processing technique to the wheat as it is manufactured. If it is the latter, can you expound upon the process or provide a link to more information? Thanks.

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    Interesting article. Hopefully, there will be more info on this process. I have my doubts it will work, but we can hope.

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    What is the effect on baked goods made with this wheat. If it is altered so that it does not perform the same as regular wheat with gluten that produces all that great bread we are missing - then what is the point ??

    I think the researchers are claiming that the end product will offer the benefits of wheat, without the adverse gluten reaction.

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    Is this genetic engineering? If so, I say NO to GMOs.

    From what I can tell, this does not involve genetic modification. It seems to be a process to treat commercial wheat and/or flour to make it tolerable for people with celiac disease.

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    I was unclear as to whether this is a method of genetic engineering or a processing technique to the wheat as it is manufactured. If it is the latter, can you expound upon the process or provide a link to more information? Thanks.

    in italiano

    from 800 ppm to 66 ppm

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 05/08/2007 - Announces Plans for Advancing AT-1001 into Later Stage Clinical Trials Alba Therapeutics Corporation today announced preliminary results from its Phase IIa clinical trial for AT-1001 in subjects with Celiac Disease (celiac disease), an autoimmune disease affecting over 3 million people in the United States. Albas study, the first Phase IIa trial in celiac disease and the first to assess dosing requirements for AT-1001 in celiac disease, was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of multiple doses of AT-1001 in celiac disease subjects during a 2-week gluten challenge.
    The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial enrolled 86 patients who were confirmed biopsy positive for celiac disease and in compliance with a gluten-free diet for at least six months prior to enrollment. Patients were randomized into seven drug-treated and placebo groups and challenged three times a day with gluten during a 14-day period. Four doses of the enteric coated oral formulation of AT-1001, all less than 10 mg, were given prior to each gluten challenge. Study endpoints included intestinal permeability (IP) -- a marker of disease state in celiac disease -- as well as patient symptoms and outcomes, measured by two validated tests of gastrointestinal disease outcome: the Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale (GSRS) and the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI).
    Preliminary analysis revealed the following:
    -- At day 14, IP, as measured by the change in urinary lactulose-to-
    mannitol (LA/MA) ratio, exhibited a dose dependent response. On day
    21, one week after the final drug dosing and gluten challenge, the dose
    dependent trend continued to statistically significant levels.
    -- The GSRS and PGWBI provided additional efficacy signals that further
    support the IP observations. Patients on the AT-1001 drug arms
    performed better than those on the gluten/placebo arm. Analyses
    demonstrated that several symptoms and outcomes improved at
    statistically significant levels.
    -- Safety and tolerability of multiple oral doses of AT-1001 in the
    patient population was demonstrated. There were no Severe Adverse
    Events and all Adverse Events were reported as mild or moderate.
    "We are very encouraged by the preliminary data and look forward to applying the extensive knowledge gained in this Phase IIa exploratory clinical trial to a larger, highly powered Phase IIb gluten challenge study later this year" said Blake Paterson, M.D., Chief Executive Officer of Alba Therapeutics. Using the highly complex and ambitious seven arm study design for the Phase IIa trial, we repeated the proof of concept from the Phase Ib study, showed a statistically significant effect across a variety of measures and are well prepared to move the celiac program forward."
    Based on these results, Alba will advance AT-1001 into a Phase IIb clinical study in celiac disease subjects during the third quarter of 2007. The Phase IIb study, to be performed in multiple centers in the United States and Canada, will assess the efficacy of AT-1001 utilizing multiple endpoints, including a composite index of disease activity. The first patient is expected to be enrolled into this study in the third quarter of 2007, and the study should conclude in early 2008.
    About Celiac Disease
    Celiac Disease is a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and is characterized by small intestinal inflammation, injury and intolerance to gluten. According to the National Institutes of Health, celiac disease affects approximately 3 million Americans. The only current treatment for celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which results in remission for some patients.
    About Alba
    Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Baltimore, Maryland dedicated to the development and commercialization of disease modifying therapeutics to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases based upon the regulation of tight junctions. Albas lead compound, AT-1001, is targeted towards the treatment of Celiac Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Type 1 Diabetes

    Contact: Stuart Sedlack, SVP, Corporate Development
    Phone: +1-410-319-0780

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/29/2008 - If the results of a recent study are any indication, the Greeks might be among those least affected by celiac disease.
    The study on the prevalence of celiac disease in Greece shows that the people of Thessaly have a prevalence of celiac disease that is among the lowest of all the European populations.
    Recent discoveries point to a greater prevalence of celiac disease than previously expected in a number of European populations, and the availability of new, accurate serological tests has made screening in the general population possible. These facts, coupled with the reality that no data exist regarding the prevalence of celiac disease in Greece, recently sparked a team of researchers to use a novel diagnostic algorithm to examine the general population of Thessaly, in central Greece, in an effort to determine rates of prevalence for celiac disease.
    Led by doctors Roka V, Potamianos SP, Kapsoritakis AN, Yiannaki EE, Koukoulis GN, Stefanidis I, Koukoulis GK, Germenis AE, the researcher team selected 2230 participants (1226 women, 1004 men, median age 46 years, range 18-80 years) by a random sampling from the adult general population of Thessaly.
    The researchers took blood samples and checked them for total immunoglobulin A (IgA)-serum levels, to eliminate IgA deficiency. The research team then examined samples that showed total IgA within the normal range for IgA antibodies compared to native human-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG); the researchers then tested samples that were anti-tTG positive for IgA antiendomysial antibodies (EmA).
    The researchers then examined samples from participants with selective IgA deficiency for IgG antigliadin antibodies. They referred for biopsy and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typing those participants that showed EmA-positive or antigliadin antibody-positive.
    No participant with selective IgA deficiency was detected. Four individuals tested positive for EmA, all of whom were biopsy-proven coeliacs. Therefore, the prevalence of celiac disease within this general population sample is 1: 558 or 1.8 per 1000 (SE 0.13).
    The two men, two women that did show abnormal histology were between the ages of 18 and 35. Two of them were considered to be asymptomatic and two presented with a sub-clinical course. All four showed the heterodimer HLA-DQ2.
    The evidence indicates that the people of the central Greek area of Thessaly have a prevalence of celiac disease that is among the lowest of all the European populations.
    Eur. J. Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007 Nov;19(11):982-7.


    Jefferson Adams
    06/04/2014 - A Swedish research team study of nearly four decades of population-based data shows that rates of celiac disease are rising in most age groups of children.
    The research team included Fredinah Namatovu, Olof Sandström, Cecilia Olsson, Marie Lindkvist, and Anneli Ivarsson. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, the Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, and the Department of Food and Nutrition, all at Umeå University, in Umeå, Sweden.
    In order to assess variations by age, sex and birth cohort, and to determine the clinical impact of these changes, their research team recently looked at rates of biopsy-proven celiac disease in children in Sweden over a 36-year period. The team used the National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register to identify 9,107 children under 15 years of age who were diagnosed with celiac disease from 1973 to 2009.
    From 1973 to 1990 the register covered 15% of the the Swedish population, increasing to 40% during 1991–1997, and then to 100% from 1998 onwards. The research team estimated annual celiac rates, cumulative incidence and clinical impact by age groups, calendar month and birth cohorts.
    Their results show that celiac disease rates are increasing in children aged 2–14.9 years. One encouraging piece of data revealed that celiac rates in children 1.9 years and under decreased sharply in the most recent years.
    Average age for celiac diagnosis rose from 1.0 year in the 1970s to 6.8 years by 2009. The average number of new cases rose from about 200 during 1973–1983 to about 600 during 2004–2009.
    In the birth cohorts of 2000–2002 the cumulative incidence even exceeded that of the epidemic cohorts at comparable ages. The highest overall rates were seen in those born between 1985–1995 and 2000–2002.
    Celiac disease risk varies between birth cohorts, which indicates environmental and/or lifestyle risk factors may be at play in triggering celiac disease. Finding new prevention strategies will require further research.
    Source:
    BMC Gastroenterology 2014, 14:59. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-14-59

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/01/2014 - I sometimes have to remind myself that it’s the 21st century, and that some amazing scientific breakthroughs that sound like something out of science fiction are, in fact, real.
    Take for example the technology, recently developed by researchers at the University at Buffalo, that allows researchers to safely examine intestines using nanoparticles. The popular name for these orally administered nanoparticles suspended in liquid is ‘Nanojuice.’
    Human small intestines are each about 23 feet long and 1 inch thick. Located between the stomach and the large intestine, the small intestine is notoriously difficult to examine, hence procedures like biopsies, endoscopies, etc.
    The new technique, being developed by researchers at the University at Buffalo, uses nanoparticles and lasers to image the organ. Once the nanoparticles reach the intestines, doctors can strike the particles with a harmless laser. The technique provides real-time view of the intestine. This will help doctors diagnose irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, Crohn's disease and other gastrointestinal illnesses, according to the researchers.
    So far, the research team has only tested their technology on mice, but they plan to refine the technique for clinical trials on human subjects. Researchers say that this method can help doctors get a better picture of the nature of celiac and other diseases.
    The study is published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
    What do you think? Will products like nanojuice represent the future of celiac disease diagnosis? If it is shown to be safe, would you prefer it to a biopsy?
    Source:
    Natureworldnews.com

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    If any tests for celiac disease are positive, it generally means that follow up tests, perhaps a biopsy, are needed to confirm CD. Be sure that your daughter continues to eat gluten until all testing is completed, as not eating it could skew future test results.
    Thank you for your reply. I have just edited my post to add nausea! Another big symptom.  Did your doctor send you straight for endoscopy with negative blood results? Or do those other blood tests first? 
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