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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Did the Japanese Just Nail the Secret to Great Gluten-free Bread?

      Have Japanese researcher discovered the secret to perfect gluten-free bread?

    Caption: Photo: CC--Emran Kassim

    Celiac.com 04/12/2017 - Researchers at Hiroshima University say they have perfected the science behind a new bread-baking recipe. Developed by Japan's National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, NARO, the method uses rice-flour to produce gluten-free bread with a similar consistency and volume to traditional wheat-flour loaves.

    Now, rice-flour based gluten-free breads are old hat, but they've long had a reputation for being dry, crumbly, soulless creations that pale in comparison to even the cheapest traditional breads.

    The Japanese rice bread is 100% natural, and offers a consistency and texture similar to wheat breads. Breads made with wheat flour are soft, spongy and chewy in large part because of gluten's ability to form a flexible matrix. This matrix provides stability for the thin dough/bread walls, which are formed between CO2 bubbles produced by fermenting yeast. It also enables bread to "rise" in response to increasing CO2 levels during the baking process.

    Since standard rice flour contains no gluten, the researchers needed to develop a new method that would bring these vital bread characteristics to their gluten-free bread. NARO solved the problem by using a specific type of wet milling process to produce their rice flour. The wet-mill process to make flour for gluten-free bread permits the formation of a microstructure of the fermenting batter, and in the resulting loaf, creating tiny bubbles coated in uniform undamaged starch particles in suitably supportive matrix.

    The research team found that this process created properties previously unseen in rice-flour; properties arising from the undamaged starch particles created by the milling technique

    They dub this supportive matrix "stone walls,” and they apparently form due to the surface activity of the undamaged starch granules. It appears these granules are able to lower the surface tension of water, and reduce the likelihood of collapse in the formed bubble walls. The result is spongier, chewier bread.

    Some of the researchers suspect that the stability of the undamaged starch bubble is due to the uniform hydrophobicity of the similar sized granules, and that these cause an interface between damp gaseous air pockets and the liquid batter. Whatever the exact reason, this "stone wall" matrix allows bubbles to grow and expand as interior CO2 levels increase, which leads to superior bread loaves.

    This technique has the potential to revolutionize the gluten-free bread industry. Stay tuned to see how the story evolves.

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    I just researched it and this flour is also called glutineous rice flour and/or wet milled rice flour. Haven't tried it yet, but it's my next project in making bread with this type of flour. Thanks for the info!

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    I was really excited when I read this article. I researched it and this rice flour is also called glutineous rice flour or wet milled rice flour. For Terry who says it's similar to Glutino white bread, many of us cannot eat Glutino because of of a corn allergy. So being able to make our own yummy bread with this wet milled rice flour is exciting.

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    Schar makes the best white and multigraine bread around. Include also hot dog buns, hamburger buns,etc. Well worth the price if you are hungry. Hopefully, the prices will come down sooner than later.

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    Guest Lynard Henderson

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    Schar makes the best white and multigraine bread around. Include also hot dog buns, hamburger buns,etc. Well worth the price if you are hungry. Hopefully, the prices will come down sooner than later.

    Schar uses corn, and I can't eat corn.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    This recipe has been modified from Bette Hagemans Butter Basted White Bread (More From the Gluten-Free Gourmet, page 38). Here it is:
    Combine 2 cups white rice flour, ½ cup potato starch flour, ½ cup tapioca flour, 2 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum, 2/3 cup dairy milk powder, 1 ½ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar and 2 ¼ teaspoon saf-instant yeast granules thoroughly. In a separate bowl, combine 4 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup warm water, 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. Slowly add to dry mixture, then add 3 room temperature eggs, one at a time (the mix should feel a little warm). Beat on high for 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and a towel, and rise until doubled (time varies). After the first rise, beat the dough again for 3 minutes on high. Fill a large loaf pan 2/3 full (can use extra dough in muffin tins) Let rise until slightly over top of pan; bake at 350 for 30-45 minutes, covering with alum foil after the first 10 minutes. Delicious, and freezes pretty well.
    This recipe comes to us from Marne L. Platt in New Jersey.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/24/2012 - Tired of the standard choices for gluten-free pasta? If researchers at the University of Brazil have their way, you may soon be enlivening your current gluten-free choices with pasta made from the flour of green bananas.
    The researchers included Renata Puppin Zandonadi, PhD, Raquel Braz Assunção Botelho, PhD, Lenora Gandolfi, PhD, Janini Selva Ginani, MSc, Flávio Martins Montenegro, MSc, and Riccardo Pratesi, PhD.
    According to an article in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the team found a way to make pasta out of green banana flour. The flour is completely gluten-free, and the pasta compares favorably with pasta made from whole wheat, according to taste test results.
    Currently, green bananas are regarded an undesirable product, with low commercial value, and limited industrial use. In an effort to change that reality, the researchers set out to develop and analyze a gluten-free pasta made with green banana flour.
    When they tested their finished product, they found "no significant difference between the modified pasta and standard samples in terms of appearance, aroma, flavor, and overall quality," study researcher Renata Puppin Zandonadi, PhD, of the University of Brazil, said in a statement.
    For the study, researchers had 50 people without celiac disease, and 25 with celiac disease, taste whole wheat pasta made with eggs, and compare it with pasta made from green banana flour, egg whites, gums and water.
    Both the test group with celiac disease and the group without celiac disease reported that the banana flour pasta tasted better overall than the whole wheat pasta.
    If the project pans out, it could be a win-win-win, offering banana growers and pasta product makers a way to expand their markets, and offering consumers of gluten-free pasta a new and delicious alternative.
    What do you think about the idea of gluten-free pasta made from green bananas? Share your comments below.

    Source:
     Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/06/2012 - Researchers at the Department of Food Technology of the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid have used teff flour to develop a new biscuit they claim is suitable for "celiac patients and sportsmen."
    Teff (Eragrostis tef) is an annual grass, a species of lovegrass, native to the northern Ethiopian and Eritrean highlands of Northeast Africa. Flour made from teff grains has been used in local bread products for centuries.
    Before you picture a light, fluffy, fresh-from-the-oven biscuit, it's important to remember that the Europeans use the term biscuit for what Americans call a 'cracker.' So, the final product is likely something drier and crunchier than the American biscuit, and much more like an American cracker.
    The developers have applied for a patent on their process, and say that manufacturers will be able to use the process to create new products once it is granted.
    One of the current challenges for manufacturers of gluten-free foods is to modify their production process in order to mimic the natural, chewy, elastic properties that are inherent to wheat flour. That challenge is one reason so many gluten-free products are dry and brittle.
    That is not true of this new product, say the researchers. Unlike many non-wheat flours, teff has a "high capacity to absorb water and act also as binder in the dough, alleviating the problems deriving from the absence of gluten in cereal,” said the researchers.
    According to the research team, 100g of teff contains between 9 and 15 grams of protein, 73 grams of carbohydrates, 2 grams of fat and 3 grams of fiber.
    This means that their product needs no added fats or artificial thickeners commonly used in other gluten-­free foods, which reduces calories and improves texture and flavor. Moreover, the biscuits can be made using existing manufacturing processes.
    Teff also has a remarkable essential amino acids profile, note the researchers. It is high in zinc and iron, and has a naturally low glycemic index, resulting in a slow breakdown of its carbohydrates.
    The resulting product, they say, will appeal to athletes, diabetics and people with anemia, and celiac disease, and will likely sell at a lower price than similar products.
    Other than teff flour, the biscuits also include skimmed milk, non­fat plain yogurt, brown sugar, defatted cocoa powder, orange zest and hazelnuts.
    Source:
    Nutraingredients.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Girl Scouts Announce Return of Gluten-Free Cookies For 2016
    Celiac.com 02/17/2016 - Gluten-free Girl Scout Cookies are much loved by many with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivities. That's why it will be taken as great news for lovers of Girl Scout Cookies, and things gluten-free, to hear that Girl Scouts of the USA has announced the return of gluten-free Girl Scout Cookies for the 2016 cookie season.
    Two returning popular gluten-free favorites include Toffee-tastic, the buttery cookie with toffee bits, and Trios, made with real peanut butter, chocolate chips, and whole grain oats.
    These tasty treats made history in 2015 as the organization's first-ever nationwide offering of gluten-free options. They, along with other delicious favorites like Thin Mints and Samoas/Caramel deLites, will be available nationwide from most Girl Scout councils.
    Unfortunately, not all varieties will be available in every market, so check with your local Girl Scout council to find out which the cookies will be sold in your area. Also, check out Google or Apple to download the mobile Girl Scout Cookie finder app for your Android or iPhone.

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