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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    EpiCast Report on Celiac Disease Offers Epidemiology Forecast to 2023

    Celiac.com 12/24/2014 - Market research firm RNRMarketReseach has announced the release of its EpiCast Report: Celiac Disease - Epidemiology Forecast to 2023.

    Image: Wikimedia Commons--John William WaterhouseWritten and developed by Masters and PhD-level epidemiologists, the EpiCast Report uses literature review and primary research results, consistent definitions and methodology to offer in-depth, high quality, transparent and market-driven analysis of celiac disease trends in the six major markets (6MM) of the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and UK through 2023.

    The report provides an overview of the risk factors, comorbidities, and the global and historical trends for celiac disease in these markets.

    The report also includes a 10-year epidemiological forecast for the total prevalent cases of celiac disease segmented by sex and age (0-19 years, 20-29 years, 30-39 years, 40-49 years, 50-59 years, 60-69 years, and over 70 years), along with a 10-year epidemiological forecast for the diagnosed prevalent cases of celiac disease in the 6MM.

    The report includes forecast data on the number of total prevalent cases of celiac disease in the 6MM, which it projects to grow at a rate of 3.92% per year, to a total of more than 8 million cases, through 2023.

    The report also projects the number of diagnosed prevalent cases in the 6MM to increase by 4.61% over the next decade to 1.11 million cases in 2023.

    Anyone interested in the details may purchase a copy at EpiCast Report: Celiac Disease – Epidemiology Forecast to 2023.


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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac Disease Prevalence is on the Rise
    Celiac.com 10/12/2011 - According to recent estimates, three million Americans suffer from celiac disease—approximately 1% of the population, and only three percent of them have to this writing been correctly diagnosed. As startling as that sounds to us all, according to a news article on Medscape Today, the incidence of celiac disease has increased markedly over the last three decades, perhaps even as fourfold, and studies are suggesting the incidence may actually be higher than 1% of the population.
    What is the reason for this? According to Dr. Jonas Ludvigsson, MD, from the Department of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit at the Karolinska Institute and Orebro University Hospital in Sweden, and a renowned celiac expert, there may be many factors explaining this, but there probably is an actual increase underlying these.
    The Medscape article went on to report that the Mayo Clinic has confirmed increase in celiac disease incidence, reported in Discovery's Edge, the Mayo Clinic's research magazine. Dr. Joseph Murray, MD, and colleagues analyzed stored blood samples from Air Force recruits in the early 1950s for gluten antibodies. It was assumed that 1% would be positive, given today's estimates, but the number of positive results was far smaller. Dr. Murray and his colleagues compared their results with two more recently collected sets with the conclusion that celiac disease is about four times more common today than it was in the 1950s.
    Additionally, Dr. Ludviggon's research team in Sweden has found that those living with celiac disease and latent celiac disease have higher mortality than those who don't have these conditions. Latent celiac disease is also known as "gluten sensitivity," a term to describe those who have "normal small intestinal mucosa but positive celiac disease serology," estimated to affect 1 in 1000 people. According to Dr. Ludvigsson's research team, in 1 year, 10 of 1000 individuals with celiac disease will die, as compared with 7 in 1000 individuals without the disease. The mortality rate is increased among those who also have latent celiac disease as well. The increased risk, however, is quite small.
    As alarming as the statistics are regarding the increasing rate of celiac disease, Dr. Ludvigsson shares some good news with Medscape—the methods of diagnosing celiac disease are actually improving. According to some other estimates, the rate of celiac diagnosis rate is increasing. For those who are testing positive for the celiac disease, the only method of treatment currently available is eliminating gluten from the diet. Yes, this is a simple treatment, although it can require some challenging lifestyle adjustments for the gluten-free community, something which I address in my work as an author, researcher, and gluten-free advocate. In the future, we may see other treatments such as gluten-digesting enzymes (which are on the rise) or even the genetic modification of the structure of gluten in wheat so that it will not cause an autoimmune reaction in celiac patients. Even with celiac diagnosis incidence on the rise, with raised awareness and effective diagnosis, we can help change the lives of millions of celiac Americans for the better. This is an important endeavor.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/06/2012 - The same ultrasound technology that helps doctors and expectant parents to view a developing baby might soon literally mean a better gluten-free bun in the oven.
    That's because engineers researching how ultrasound could be used to improve industrial baking have received a UK government grant of £500,000 (about $725,000 U.S. dollars) to commercialize their technology.
    The grant from the Technology Strategy Board will support the 25-month project,which will be led by food ingredient manufacturer Macphie of Glenbervie and involve Piezo Composite Transducers, Mono Bakery Equipment and Fosters Bakery.
    The engineers, based at Heriot-Watt University, say their technique reduces processing time and improves energy usage, reduces wastage and improves the texture of gluten-free products.
    They declined to give details about the exact nature of their technology, and how it worked. However, they did say that ultrasonic waves helped baking dough to regulate its energy and mass balance, which prevents air pockets from forming and helped protect the structure of the dough against collapse.
    Research leader Dr Carmen Torres-Sánchez said that the technology would allow bakers to create products that met current demand for specific ingredients, but which would be much more aesthetically or texturally attractive.
    For example, she said, ‘[t]here is a lot of pressure on bakers to reduce salt content and that can affect production, causing an imbalance in osmotic pressure so that the dough becomes very sticky…without gluten, products can collapse and look bad. We can use this technology to tailor the texture of products.’
    The lab has researched and developed the technique through several feasibility studies. It is based on methods usually used to control the porosity of industrial materials such as foaming polymer.
    ‘The big question now is how to scale up the technology,’ said Torres-Sánchez. ‘We’ve been doing semi-continuous batches; now we need to use it continuously, producing up to 1,000 loaves in 30 minutes.’
    The team also needs to further examine whether the technique can save energy proportionally as it is scaled up. Torres-Sánchez hopes the project will give rise to ovens and other bakery equipment with built-in ultrasonic technology that can easily be controlled as products are baked.
    Source:

    http://www.theengineer.co.uk/production-engineering/news/ultrasound-could-improve-the-efficiency-of-industrial-baking/1010813.article

    Jefferson Adams
    BioLineRx Clears Latest Hurdle for Celiac Treatment Drug
    Celiac.com 12/09/2014 - Biopharmaceutical company BioLineRx Ltd., has announced successful final results from its Phase 1/2 study for BL-7010, a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease.
    BL-7010 is a new, non-absorbable, orally available co-polymer intended for the treatment of celiac disease. The drug works by sequestering gliadins, effectively masking them from enzymatic degradation and preventing the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger an adverse immune reaction when people with celiac disease consume wheat.
    This significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. BL-7010 is excreted with gliadin from the digestive tract and is not absorbed into the blood.
    The trial results showed BL-7010 to be safe and well tolerated in both single- and repeated-doses, and pharmacokinetic analyses revealed no systemic exposure of BL-7010 in plasma and urine samples.
    The company has also settled on a one gram, three times per day regimen of BL-7010 as the optimal repeated dose for an upcoming randomized, placebo-controlled efficacy study set to begin in the last half of 2015.
    The absence of systemic exposure will likely support a medical-device classification for BL-7010, which would significantly accelerate its development in Europe.

    Source:
    Marketwatch.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/14/2015 - Recent epidemiological studies show that celiac disease rates are still underestimated, both in Europe and in Mediterranean regions. But how is better testing impacting higher celiac numbers in Europe?
    To get a clearer picture, a team of researchers recently set out to review the latest data on celiac rates and incidence in the European Union (EU) as of September 2014.
    The research team included E. Altobelli, R. Paduano, R. Petrocelli, and F. Di Orio. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences at the University of L'Aquila in L'Aquila, Italy, and with ASREM in Molise, Italy.
    They assessed the celiac disease rates and cases by conducting a search of PubMed for papers in English using the key words "celiac disease", "celiac disease plus prevalence" (limits: 1990-2014), "incidence" (limits: 1970-2014), and "frequency", plus "in Europe". They conducted additional searches using the same key words plus the name of each European country.
    The team included only prevalence data obtained by serology using anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), EMA test, tTG test, and/or duodenal biopsy, and only studies that were retrospective and prospective, such as population-based, cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies.
    They found that the overall undiagnosed celiac population in EU is 0.5-1%, whereas the highest estimate reported in population-based studies is approximately 1%.
    Considering data from different periods, incidence seems to range from 0.1 to 3.7/1000 live births in the child population and from 1.3 to 39/100,000/year in the adult population.
    Interestingly, though perhaps unsurprisingly, the data show clear geographical variation in both cases and rates of celiac disease in various European countries.
    They note a rising occurrence of celiac disease in recent decades in European countries, due partly to the advent of improved serological testing (tTG + EMA) and partly to increased awareness of its clinical presentation.
    Source:
    Ann Ig. 2014 Nov-Dec;26(6):485-98. doi: 10.7416/ai.2014.2007.

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