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    Fast, Accurate Portable Gluten Sensor in Development


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 06/26/2014 - Imagine being able to go to a party, or a restaurant, and test any food on your plate for gluten.


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    Photo: CC--Wikimedia Commons--skatebikerA company called 6SensorLabs is developing a gluten sensor based on existing protein sensing technology that is already commercially available and proven to work. The company is looking to design a gluten test that can be used with all types of food.

    The portable test would work by placing a sample of food would be placed in a disposable pod and placing the pod in a sensor.

    Once activated, the device would tell you, in two minutes or less, if the food sample contained any gluten over the FDA standard of 20 ppm gluten or more.

    The sensor could also be used to detect gluten in any packaged foods.

    The sensor is designed to test a specific section of food on your plate, or a sauce, soup or liquid. It would not be able to detect traces of gluten that might be hiding somewhere else on your plate.

    While the product would have its limits in this respect, it would give users the ability to detect gluten in many cases.

    Would you want such a tool? Would it be helpful for you?

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Dick L.

    Posted

    If it's no larger than a small cell phone, uses AA or AAA batteries, is silent and odorless, costs no more than a hundred dollars, and if the disposable pods are no more than three dollars apiece, I'd be interested. If it had more quantification-- 5, 10, 15, 20, >20 ppm-- I'd be more interested. It would have to handle rye and barley "glutens" as well as that from wheat.

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    Guest Cathy Green

    Posted

    ABSOLUTELY if they. make it affordable!

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    Guest Denise Peinado

    Posted

    I would love this....

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    Guest Erin Weinberg

    Posted

    This would be such a huge stress reliever for me!

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    Guest Eleanor

    Posted

    I would purchase in a heartbeat .... if I could afford it.

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    Guest sc'Que?

    Posted

    "The sensor is designed to test a specific section of food on your plate, or a sauce, soup or liquid. It would not be able to detect traces of gluten that might be hiding somewhere else on your plate." WHAT DOES THIS MEAN???

     

    In short, make it a phone-compatible app so that everyone has the means at their disposal with minimal financial investment.

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    Guest Luann

    Posted

    That would be SOOO fantastic!!! Can't wait to hear more.

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    How soon can I buy it? This weekend I didn't trust my waiter after discussing my gluten allergy. I'd have loved to be able to test for gluten when my meal was served.

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    Guest MamaG

    Posted

    YES! Ditto to what Dick L. and Cathy Green said....something like this would be GREAT especially for my daughter who is heading off to college this fall...where they say they offer gluten free foods in their dining halls BUT they cannot guarantee that all food service workers understand proper handling of gluten-free foods...which means that the gluten-free foods may be cross-contaminated...UGH....talk about frustration!

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    Guest Teresa

    Posted

    This would be wonderful. You could take it to a restaurant and test their "gluten free" options and see if they are truly gluten free. I'm in!

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    Guest Chuck

    Posted

    Sounds great. Would by regardless of price.

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    Guest Katrina

    Posted

    Please please make this!!!

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    Guest Helen

    Posted

    That would be wonderful. I would defiantly buy one. It would save so much worry.

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    Guest Rena

    Posted

    I want one. Please make it easy to use in a restaurant or an outing.

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    Guest Mary

    Posted

    We'd be very interested, so our teen could have a device to carry. From a reality standpoint, 2 min seems like a long time when hanging out with friends in a restaurant, or in a pot luck line. Financially, this would have to be affordable. As much as we'd like to say, "any price would be worth it," the truth is, it's easier to avoid some places and foods than to fork over money we don't have--especially in the beginning when it's accuracy may not be trusted, and when a teen may not feel comfortable using it in front of friends. Great concept though! Hope it makes it quickly through the developmental stages.

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    Guest brad

    Posted

    If it's no larger than a small cell phone, uses AA or AAA batteries, is silent and odorless, costs no more than a hundred dollars, and if the disposable pods are no more than three dollars apiece, I'd be interested. If it had more quantification-- 5, 10, 15, 20, >20 ppm-- I'd be more interested. It would have to handle rye and barley "glutens" as well as that from wheat.

    Yes bring it on, this would be a game changer!

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    Guest Jill

    Posted

    Yes! Please make it affordable, portable, accurate - we are already being ROBBED because of the high costs of gluten-free food. We would buy one in a heartbeat if it is affordable, reusable and can sample "every" food item on the plate.

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    Guest Linda

    Posted

    Such a device would be great! Wonder if our physicians could prescribe them to us and let our insurance companies give us a hand with the expense ...

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    Guest Linda

    Posted

    I would certainly buy it. I was just "glutened" at one of my tried and true restaurants just a few days ago.

    Not to mention, it would be a huge help when traveling.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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