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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    IS INTESTINAL BIOPSY AVOIDABLE IN DIAGNOSING CELIAC DISEASE?


    Destiny Stone

    Celiac.com 07/14/2010 - Intestinal biopsy is considered the the gold standard for celiac disease testing. However, biopsy is an  invasive procedure and most people would be happy to avoid biopsy all together. Based solely on serology, a new diagnostic standard  has been proposed that would no longer require intestinal biopsy for celiac disease diagnosis in some patients.


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    Researchers performed duodenal biopsy and serology in six-hundred and seventy-nine adults who were at high risk and low risk for celiac disease. They tested blood samples  to detect antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP). The goal of researchers was to establish the diagnostic performance of various serological tests for diagnosing celiac disease in patients with varying pretest results. In this study, they hope to find potential serological algorithms to decrease the requirement for biopsy.

    One-hundred and sixty-one consecutive adults with undiagnosed, but suspected intestinal disorders were selected as the high-risk group to be evaluated for celiac disease. Five-hundred and eighteen patients who had been referred for routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy due to non-specific symptoms such as indigestion, were randomly selected for the low-risk group.

    Prevalence of celiac disease was found in 39.1% of the high-risk group, and 3.3% of the low-risk group. Of the  high-risk patients, all individual assays demonstrated a high diagnostic efficacy, while the low-risk group demonstrated a lower diagnostic efficacy.

    The serological findings of this study demonstrated that the algorithm used for individual assays allows patients to avoid biopsy with a negative serology; and positive serology results would require a patient to undergo biopsy. The DGF/tTG Screen assay  may very well be recognized as the best preliminary test for celiac disease. The combination of two tests which include a DGP/tTG screening, may have the ability to  identify celiac disease correctly in various clinical situations, which would allow biopsy to be avoided in the vast majority of cases.

    Although the findings were significant for this study, small bowel histology is still deemed the gold standard for accurate celiac disease diagnosis. Further validation of the algorithms is necessary to confirm the findings of this study before new diagnostic guidelines can be considered.

    Source:
    World J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jul 7;16(25):3144-52.

     



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    Guest CJ Hughes

    Posted

    Plain English would sure be nice. It sounds to me like the patient who is self-diagnosed needs to start eating gluten again in order to undergo the alternative diagnostic method, like they would for the biopsy. That is just a totally unreasonable requirement. As in - not gonna happen.

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    Guest Courtney

    Posted

    Plain English would sure be nice. It sounds to me like the patient who is self-diagnosed needs to start eating gluten again in order to undergo the alternative diagnostic method, like they would for the biopsy. That is just a totally unreasonable requirement. As in - not gonna happen.

    I concur. What's even more ridiculous, is having to keep eating gluten until after the biopsy. Even with 2 positive blood tests, I must now wait, and suffer, while waiting to be seen by the gastroenterologist. You would think that if the blood came back positive the physicians might speed the process up, so one needs not to suffer.

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    Guest VICKIE

    Posted

    Well try having the serology negative and the biopsy positive by even a second opinion and then the next time sent to hospital with dehydration from diarrhea and low potassium, etc... and u have yet another invasive test, that they tell you that you do not have celiac disease you have leukocytic colitis caused from the anti-inflammatory drugs they put you on with a second opinion confirming that diagnosis but not ruleing out celiac disease and at follow up with GI doctor. he tells you that all you must have is IBS. What & where do you go then? So what test are actually right or accurate in diagnosing anything? or is it just the doctor?

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    admin

    Currently, the Center for Celiac Research is involved in two critical areas:
    * Multi-Center Serological Screening Study to determine the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States; and
    * New Diagnostic Assay to develop a non-invasive diagnostic test for Celiac Disease.
    1) SEROLOGIC SCREENING STUDY
    We have tested 3,076 samples as part of the Multi-Center Serological Study for the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States. Our preliminary findings indicate that 6.8% of first-degree relatives and 4.7% of second-degree relatives of Celiacs test positive for the disease. These results are similar to those reported previously in Europe, suggesting that Celiac Disease is currently under-diagnosed in the United States.We are extremely encouraged by these preliminary findings; however, many more subjects need to be screened to put the study into full operation. Your financial help is pivotal to accomplish our goals.
    2) NEW DIAGNOSTIC ASSAY
    Our scientists have been able to develop a more sensitive, non-invasive, and specific test for Celiac Disease based on the use of tissue transglutaminase. We were able, for the first time, to clone the human transglutaminase gene. By using this tool, we have developed a new diagnostic tool that may eventually allow us to make a definite diagnosis of Celiac Disease without an intestinal biopsy.
    BLOOD SCREENING UPDATE
    Blood screenings of first and second-degree relatives have been conducted in New York, North Carolina, New Hampshire, California, Pennsylvania, Washington, Maryland, Texas, and Rhode Island.Screenings are scheduled for Billings, Montana June 19th, Louisville, Kentucky September, 18th and Vermont (to be scheduled in Oct/Nov.)
    WEB SITE
    Thanks to the sponsorship of Dietary Specialties, we are very excited to announce that the Center for Celiac Research will have a web site. The domain name will be www.celiaccenter.org. and should be on line by June 21st.
    FUND-RAISING UPDATE
    As of June 1, 1999, the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Research has received approximately $340,000 in contributions and pledges. We thank all of you who have made a contribution or pledge. The Center was very fortunate to receive three significant pledges/contributions over the past four months which helped boost our contribution total by more than $100,000 since our last update. Although this is a significant increase, we must keep the momentum going.
    For now, we cannot rely on any outside financial assistance. So please, help us to help you. Remember we are not asking you to make a contribution, but to make an investment in the well being of every celiac - now and in the future.
    NINTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CELIAC DISEASE
    The Center for Celiac Research, the University of Maryland Program for Continuing Education, the University of Chicago, and the University of California, San Diego are pleased to announce joint sponsorship of the Ninth International Symposium on Celiac Disease. The symposium will be held August 10-13, 2000 at the Marriotts Hunt Valley Inn, Hunt Valley, Maryland.
    The medical program to be presented will discuss the most advanced knowledge of the genetic, immunological, and diagnostic aspects of Celiac Disease. In addition, a panel of international experts will discuss new frontiers for the treatment and prevention of Celiac Disease. Celiacs from around the world will be given the opportunity to compare
    the practical aspects of living with Celiac Disease in different countries and cultures at a full day session. Registration information and costs will be available in August and will be posted on the web site.
    WHAT CAN YOU DO?
    If you have not made a pledge or contribution, please consider making one at this time. Please make checks payable to the UM Foundation, Inc. Center for Celiac Research, Attn: Pam King, 700 W. Lombard St. Room 206, Baltimore, MD 21201. These funds are administered by the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. If possible, increase your current pledge or make another gift at this time. Discuss the importance of this study with fellow celiacs, relatives, friends or whoever might be in a position to help. Ask them to contribute. Organize discussions and/or fund-raising efforts with your local support group. For example, Tri-County Celiac Sprue from Walled Lake, MI organized a bake sale and the Greater Louisville Celiac Sprue Support Group organized a walk/run event. Both donated the proceeds to the Center. Help us to identify possible organization, companies, trusts or foundations that might be in a position to help. Please contact Pam King at 410-706-8021 if you have any questions or need any assistance. Send contributions to the Center for Celiac Research in honor or in memory of a friend or loved one. Make a gift to the Center in honor of the new year.

    admin
    Celiac.com 12/27/2005 - Funding for NIH (including the NIDDK which conducts critical research into Celiac disease) in next years Labor-HHS Appropriations Bill is only slightly above last years levels-inadequate to compensate for inflation and the development of promising research. However, Congress is also in the process of approving a 1% across-the-board cut to ALL discretionary programs (except Veterans programs)-including NIH.
    This cut will decrease the NIH funding level for the first time in a generation and put in mortal jeporady the research that can lead to treatments and eventually a cure for Celiac disease. Not only will this cut affect the work of NIH for this year, but will set back medical research into Celiac disease for many years to come.
    Because the Celiac community relies heavily on research conducted by NIH, it is critical that individuals speak out against this bill. Because of the low NIH funding, the Celiac community must demand that the Labor-HHS appropriations bill be rejected, and a new bill that addresses the funding needs of NIH be enacted.
    The bill has passed the House of Representatives and awaits a vote in the Senate. If you have not yet contacted your Senator to ask for their no vote on this bill, please do so now. If you have, please do so again. To reach your Senator, call the Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask to be connected with the offices of your states Senators.
    The progress of vital research for Celiac disease and countless other ailments and conditions lies in the balance. Please do your part and speak out!
    Jonathan R Pawlow, Jr.
    Digestive Disease National Coalition
    507 Capitol Court, NE, Suite 200
    Washington, DC 20002
    202-544-7497
    202-546-7105 (fax)
    Pawlow@HMCW.org
    NIH Appropriations Update
    Continue to urge congress to support biomedical research in the final fiscal year 2006 labor-hhs-education appropriations bill
    The United States Senate was expected to vote on the fiscal year 2006 appropriations bill for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education last week. The health communitys advocacy in opposition to the Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill had an impact in the Senate, as Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) set aside a vote on the bill.
    However, on Sunday, December 18th, the House passed the fiscal year 2006 Defense appropriations bill, which included a 1% reduction in appropriations for all federal programs excluding veterans assistance. This means the budget for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive a cut in funding, leaving the budget below fiscal year 2005 levels, if the Senate approves the fiscal year 2006 Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill. The Senate is expected to vote this week, as early as today, on the bill.
    Requested Action:
    Please contact your senators immediately and urge them to vote no on the Labor-HHS Appropriations Conference Report. in addition, ask them to restore funding for NIH in the bill to the level originally called for in the senate version of the legislation ($29.3 billion).
    To contact your senators, please visit www.senate.gov or call the U.S. Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/29/2013 - In an effort to determine the accuracy of claims that rates of celiac disease are on the rise, a team of researchers recently examined rates of celiac disease in a well-defined US county.
    The research team included Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Alberto Rubio-Tapia, Carol T. van Dyke, L. Joseph Melton, Alan R. Zinsmeister, Brian D. Lahr and Joseph A. Murray. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the Departments of Medicine and Immunology at the College of Medicine of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA, and the Department of Pediatrics of Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden.
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    Overall, they found 249 cases of celiac disease, 92 cases in men and 157 cases in women, in Olmsted County, between 2000 and 2010. Average patient age was 37.9 years. Once adjusted for age and sex, the overall rate of celiac disease within the time studied was 17.4 (95% confidence interval (CI)=15.2–19.6) per 100,000 person-years. That means an increase of over six percent; from 11.1 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI=6.8–15.5) in 2000–2001. The data show the increase leveling off after 2004.
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    Source:
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 19 March 2013. doi:10.1038/ajg.2013.60

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
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    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
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    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
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    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
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    Source:
    cnbc.com