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    More Black Americans Avoiding Gluten


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 04/29/2015 - In addition to people with celiac disease, a number of people in the U.S. do not have celiac disease, but avoid gluten (PWAG).

    Photo: CC--AsboluvResearchers don't know much about racial disparities in the rates of celiac disease, and among those without celiac disease, but who avoid gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to investigate and describe racial differences in the prevalence of celiac disease and PWAG, and evaluate the trends of celiac disease in the non-institutionalized civilian adult population of the US between 1988 and 2012. The research team included Rok Seon Choung MD, PhD, Ivo C Ditah MD, MPhil, Ashley M Nadeau, Alberto Rubio-Tapia MD, Eric V Marietta MD, Tricia L Brantner, Michael J Camilleri MD, S Vincent Rajkumar MD, Ola Landgren MD, PhD, James E Everhart MD, MPH, and Joseph A Murray MD.

    They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, the Myeloma Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, and with the Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

    The team conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 1988 to 1994, 1999 to 2004, and 2009 to 2012. They tested serum samples from the NHANES participants for celiac serology, which included IgA tissue transglutaminase (tTG IgA), and then tested any abnormal findings for IgA endomysial antibodies.

    They used an interviewer-administered questionnaire to gather information about patient adherence to a gluten-free diet.

    Their review of NHANES 2009–2012 showed that adjusted rates of celiac disease were significantly higher (P<0.0001) in non-Hispanic whites (1.0%) than in non-Hispanic blacks (0.2%) and Hispanics (0.3%).

    Meanwhile, blacks showed a significantly higher adjusted prevalence of PWAG of 1.2% (P=0.01), compared with Hispanics at 0.5% and whites 0.7%.

    In adults aged 50 years and older, seroprevalence of celiac disease rose from 0.17% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03–0.33) in 1988–1994 to 0.44% (95% CI 0.24–0.81) in 2009–2012 (P<0.05).

    Overall rates of celiac disease increased from 1988 to 2012, which is much more common in white Americans than in black Americans. Interestingly, black Americans make up a higher proportion of individuals maintaining a gluten-free diet in the absence of a celiac disease diagnosis.

    It may be that celiac disease, or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, are more common in the black population that previously understood. Further study will undoubtedly shed some light on this issue.

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    Guest Nieka Jones

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    The reason for the situation in the African-American Community is that most of us were misdiagnosed as having IBS which was coined by Doctors as "non-white celiac disease" as well as Food Intolerance and Hives or Eczema along with Hemorrhoids, Diverticulitis or Diverticulosis instead of being diagnosed with IBD such as Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis before 2009. The diagnosis of Celiac and IBD was common in the African-American Community if you're light-skinned! After 2009, some doctors began to diagnose medium and dark skinned person as having Celiac and IBD! The reason for the jump is correlated conditions such as pre-type 1 diabetes and GYN issues like not having a period for 3 months along with better training to get everyone testes regardless of race or skin complexion in African-Americans! While a small portion are still clinging to old attitudes by not giving the proper diagnoses in spite of what the blood test reveals and not ordering follow up tests like Colonoscopy and Endoscopy; but a prescription for Probiotics for we can't (in their opinion) afford gluten-free products and better of preparing to take a turn for the worst by eventually getting and dying of Colon Cancer! Colon Cancer rates are higher in the community due to these biased ways of thinking!

     

    This is considered a stigma in the African-American Community for your excluded from joining a church and/or get put out of your church (excommunicated) someone in the church notifies the pastor of this fact or asking for a gluten-free Wafer to have during Communion by telling you to practice African-America Spirituality aka Afrocentric Voodoo if you insist on being a Christian—go Presbyterian or Episcopal (aka Anglican)! On top of things being excluded from going to a Soup Kitchen/Food Pantry because the pastor doesn't want to pay the local Food Bank Distributors $40 for the Specialty Food Items for you to pick up at the church by telling you to go down to the Food Bank Distributors directly with a Doctor's note and original documents (Birth Certificate; Social Security Card; Drivers or Non-Driver's License and/or Passport) and Credit or Debit Card to pay $40 to have the stuff shipped directly to your home! The food is usually given past the expiration date! Another option if the pastor puts food in your home, you've got to host the pastor's family as well as family members of various ministries in your home for 3 nights in a row in exchange for the fresh Specialty Food Items from Costco's! These are the options in the African-American Community!

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    Guest Nieka Jones

    Posted

    I forgot to add, that since the availability of gluten-free items being sold in grocery stores since 2010 or 2011 has skyrocketed because of the gluten-free Craze; African-American can shop in their local grocery store instead of traveling to a ritzy neighborhood to buy gluten-free products but if you're on a fix income like SSI, SSD, or PA this could easily eat up your money in no time! Even though the some company such as Betty Crocker and Barilla Pasta have made gluten-free versions alongside the wheat version that's sold in local grocery stores, the gluten-free option still costs more them the wheat based one but not organic!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Scott Adams
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    We are extremely encouraged by these preliminary findings; however, many more subjects need to be screened to put the study into full operation. Your financial help is pivotal to accomplish our goals.
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    New Dot-Blot Assay We have developed a human tTG dot-blot test based on the detection of anti-tTG antibodies in serum or in one drop of whole blood, which can be carried out within thirty minutes. The preliminary results of the dot-blot assay indicate that the assay is as reliable as the human tTG ELISA test, making the diagnosis of Celiac Disease possible at the physicians ambulatory site.
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    We are happy to report that as of September 1, 1999, the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Research has received approximately $369,494.00 in contributions and pledges. We thank all of you who have made a contribution or pledge.
    As we reported in the June update, when we began this effort back in May of 1977, we suggested that if 1000 Celiacs, relatives or friends would make a commitment to pledge $200 per year for three (3) years, we would be on our way to funding this extremely important study.
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    DONATION CHECKS
    Please make all donation checks payable to the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. and send with the pledge form or a note saying that the donation is for the Center for Celiac Research. Since the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. houses all the gift funds for the University, they are not permitted to deposit checks into the Celiac account if the check is not made payable to the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. Thanks for your cooperation.
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    This is another great way to make a gift to the Center for Celiac Research and satisfy your employers request to participate in the United Way Appeal. Please designate under Other The University of Maryland Foundation/Center for Celiac Research, 511 W. Lombard St, Baltimore, MD 21201.
    OTHER WAYS OF GIVING TO THE CENTER
    For many, providing for important research is an important aspect of their financial planning. If this is true for you, prudent and skillful investment planning can create rewarding opportunities for both you and the Center for Celiac Research. You may interested to know, for example, that:
    Appreciated securities, held long-term, can be given to the Center without incurring a capital gains tax. And, the full fair market value of the securities is available as a charitable deduction. Life insurance that is no longer needed for family or business protection can provide major support for the Center while producing important tax savings for you. Participation in a pooled income fund or the establishment of a charitable trust, using appreciated securities, for the eventual benefit of the Center can be an excellent means of increasing your spendable income and minimizing income, capital gains, estate and inheritance taxes. The final opportunity to express your lasting commitment to the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine is through your will or revocable trust. Of course, charitable bequests are not subject to the federal gift tax and are not included in the taxable estate for federal estate tax purpose. WEB SITE
    Our web site, celiaccenter.org, has been on line since the middle of June. The research and fundraising updates, as well as updates on the Ninth International Symposium on Celiac Disease, individual and group screening information, blood screening locations, and donation information will be posted on the web site.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/24/2012 - Tired of the standard choices for gluten-free pasta? If researchers at the University of Brazil have their way, you may soon be enlivening your current gluten-free choices with pasta made from the flour of green bananas.
    The researchers included Renata Puppin Zandonadi, PhD, Raquel Braz Assunção Botelho, PhD, Lenora Gandolfi, PhD, Janini Selva Ginani, MSc, Flávio Martins Montenegro, MSc, and Riccardo Pratesi, PhD.
    According to an article in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the team found a way to make pasta out of green banana flour. The flour is completely gluten-free, and the pasta compares favorably with pasta made from whole wheat, according to taste test results.
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    When they tested their finished product, they found "no significant difference between the modified pasta and standard samples in terms of appearance, aroma, flavor, and overall quality," study researcher Renata Puppin Zandonadi, PhD, of the University of Brazil, said in a statement.
    For the study, researchers had 50 people without celiac disease, and 25 with celiac disease, taste whole wheat pasta made with eggs, and compare it with pasta made from green banana flour, egg whites, gums and water.
    Both the test group with celiac disease and the group without celiac disease reported that the banana flour pasta tasted better overall than the whole wheat pasta.
    If the project pans out, it could be a win-win-win, offering banana growers and pasta product makers a way to expand their markets, and offering consumers of gluten-free pasta a new and delicious alternative.
    What do you think about the idea of gluten-free pasta made from green bananas? Share your comments below.

    Source:
     Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

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