• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,644
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Whycantisleep
    Newest Member
    Whycantisleep
    Joined
  • 0

    National Institute of Health Cuts May Decrease Celiac Disease Funding


    Scott Adams

    Celiac.com 12/27/2005 - Funding for NIH (including the NIDDK which conducts critical research into Celiac disease) in next years Labor-HHS Appropriations Bill is only slightly above last years levels-inadequate to compensate for inflation and the development of promising research. However, Congress is also in the process of approving a 1% across-the-board cut to ALL discretionary programs (except Veterans programs)-including NIH.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    This cut will decrease the NIH funding level for the first time in a generation and put in mortal jeporady the research that can lead to treatments and eventually a cure for Celiac disease. Not only will this cut affect the work of NIH for this year, but will set back medical research into Celiac disease for many years to come.

    Because the Celiac community relies heavily on research conducted by NIH, it is critical that individuals speak out against this bill. Because of the low NIH funding, the Celiac community must demand that the Labor-HHS appropriations bill be rejected, and a new bill that addresses the funding needs of NIH be enacted.

    The bill has passed the House of Representatives and awaits a vote in the Senate. If you have not yet contacted your Senator to ask for their no vote on this bill, please do so now. If you have, please do so again. To reach your Senator, call the Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask to be connected with the offices of your states Senators.

    The progress of vital research for Celiac disease and countless other ailments and conditions lies in the balance. Please do your part and speak out!

    Jonathan R Pawlow, Jr.
    Digestive Disease National Coalition
    507 Capitol Court, NE, Suite 200
    Washington, DC 20002
    202-544-7497
    202-546-7105 (fax)
    Pawlow@HMCW.org

    NIH Appropriations Update

    Continue to urge congress to support biomedical research in the final fiscal year 2006 labor-hhs-education appropriations bill

    The United States Senate was expected to vote on the fiscal year 2006 appropriations bill for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education last week. The health communitys advocacy in opposition to the Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill had an impact in the Senate, as Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) set aside a vote on the bill.

    However, on Sunday, December 18th, the House passed the fiscal year 2006 Defense appropriations bill, which included a 1% reduction in appropriations for all federal programs excluding veterans assistance. This means the budget for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive a cut in funding, leaving the budget below fiscal year 2005 levels, if the Senate approves the fiscal year 2006 Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill. The Senate is expected to vote this week, as early as today, on the bill.

    Requested Action:

    Please contact your senators immediately and urge them to vote no on the Labor-HHS Appropriations Conference Report. in addition, ask them to restore funding for NIH in the bill to the level originally called for in the senate version of the legislation ($29.3 billion).

    To contact your senators, please visit www.senate.gov or call the U.S. Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    From my reading, celiac disease/gluten sensitivity is rising because of continuing genetic modification of wheat. In addition, bits of wheat (more or less) are included in a large portion of our processed foods, making it difficult to avoid. Cultures where the diet is not wheat based have little or no problem with celiac disease/gluten sensitivity.

    I prefer to address the issue in the area of prevention, as in admitting that this genetically modified wheat is potentially bad for as much as a third of our population (the number estimated to carry the gene for celiac disease). I do not think the answer is finding a new high priced drug to help control the symptoms of a disease that is a growing problem because of the way we have genetically modified one of our basic foods, then put it in the majority of foods we eat other than fresh fruits and vegetables and unseasoned dried foods.

    I would like to see more publicity to make the public aware that many of their health problems may be related to gluten sensitivity. I would like to see a greater effort on the part of food production companies to label all gluten sources and to find alternatives to the bits of gluten in food that probably are not necessary, but can cause great harm to the sensitive.

    I would like to see greater caution in the genetic modification of our food.

    Prevention keeps health care costs down. A new high priced drug for a disease that will then be well publicized will shoot health care costs vastly higher again, unnecessarily, I believe.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   17 Members, 0 Anonymous, 537 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 12/06/2005 - Alek Komarnitsky from Lafayette, CO (USA) has had thousands of Christmas lights on his house for the enjoyment of friends and neighbors since 2000. In 2002, he added a webcam and webcontrol, so people on the Internet could not only view his lights, but turn them on & off and see the results on their computer screen via the Christmas webcam. It got increasingly popular each year, and in 2004, a media frenzy erupted over it and the story went around the world on the Internet, in print, on radio, and on TV - one of the more entertaining segments was when Denver ABC-7 took him up in their helicopter for a live report on the 6:00 News of the blinking lights.
    There was only one problem - it was all a fun little Christmas hoax. The lights were real, but a sequence of still images were used to provide the illusion that people were changing them. Aleks wife was changing the lights when the chopper was overhead, but the rest of the time they never changed!
    Concerned that his prank had gotten out of hand, Alek approached the Wall Street Journal to fess up and High Tech Holiday Light Display Draws Everyone But the Skeptics revealed the hoax after Christmas. Needless to say, the media howled over this change of events, and another round of international publicity ensued as people around the world got a good post-holiday chuckle.
    For 2005, Alek suggests a headline of High Tech Holiday Display Says Bring on the Skeptics! With improved technology available, he has three (real) ChristmasCams (three more than last year!) providing real-time views of his 26,000 Christmas Lights. And using X10 power line control technology, people on the Internet really can them on and off this year. He adds Ill be sure to have it operational on Christmas Eve so web surfers can look for Santa, but realistically, I doubt well get a picture of Rudolph landing on my roof .... but HEY, you never know!
    Aleks children
    - Dirk and Kyle While www.komar.org has always been free to Internet surfers around the world, Alek encourages those people who enjoy the Christmas lights show to consider making a direct contribution to the CFCR. Aleks two sons have celiac disease, so this cause is important to him. Individuals and companies that donate are listed on the high traffic web site for Christmas lights fans around the world to see.
    And in keeping with Aleks whimsical nature, he has donated the Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World to the CFCR. There actually was a webcam last year, since as the media showed up at his house in droves, he figured he should put something up in the tree across the street to make it look like there was one. So he a cobbled together a contraption of a Christmas slide projector ($10), a half a roll of duct tape ($2), and ended up fooling the world - PRICELESS!
    The CFCR plans to have an eBay auction in December of this well constructed piece of history - again, 100% of proceeds for Celiac Research. So for those that missed out on the $28,000 Virgin Mary French Toast, get ready for the eBay auction of the The Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World.
    Make a donation at the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Disease Research
    And be sure to say For Christmas Lights when make your donation.

    Jefferson Adams
    06/04/2014 - A Swedish research team study of nearly four decades of population-based data shows that rates of celiac disease are rising in most age groups of children.
    The research team included Fredinah Namatovu, Olof Sandström, Cecilia Olsson, Marie Lindkvist, and Anneli Ivarsson. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, the Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, and the Department of Food and Nutrition, all at Umeå University, in Umeå, Sweden.
    In order to assess variations by age, sex and birth cohort, and to determine the clinical impact of these changes, their research team recently looked at rates of biopsy-proven celiac disease in children in Sweden over a 36-year period. The team used the National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register to identify 9,107 children under 15 years of age who were diagnosed with celiac disease from 1973 to 2009.
    From 1973 to 1990 the register covered 15% of the the Swedish population, increasing to 40% during 1991–1997, and then to 100% from 1998 onwards. The research team estimated annual celiac rates, cumulative incidence and clinical impact by age groups, calendar month and birth cohorts.
    Their results show that celiac disease rates are increasing in children aged 2–14.9 years. One encouraging piece of data revealed that celiac rates in children 1.9 years and under decreased sharply in the most recent years.
    Average age for celiac diagnosis rose from 1.0 year in the 1970s to 6.8 years by 2009. The average number of new cases rose from about 200 during 1973–1983 to about 600 during 2004–2009.
    In the birth cohorts of 2000–2002 the cumulative incidence even exceeded that of the epidemic cohorts at comparable ages. The highest overall rates were seen in those born between 1985–1995 and 2000–2002.
    Celiac disease risk varies between birth cohorts, which indicates environmental and/or lifestyle risk factors may be at play in triggering celiac disease. Finding new prevention strategies will require further research.
    Source:
    BMC Gastroenterology 2014, 14:59. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-14-59

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/14/2015 - Recent epidemiological studies show that celiac disease rates are still underestimated, both in Europe and in Mediterranean regions. But how is better testing impacting higher celiac numbers in Europe?
    To get a clearer picture, a team of researchers recently set out to review the latest data on celiac rates and incidence in the European Union (EU) as of September 2014.
    The research team included E. Altobelli, R. Paduano, R. Petrocelli, and F. Di Orio. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences at the University of L'Aquila in L'Aquila, Italy, and with ASREM in Molise, Italy.
    They assessed the celiac disease rates and cases by conducting a search of PubMed for papers in English using the key words "celiac disease", "celiac disease plus prevalence" (limits: 1990-2014), "incidence" (limits: 1970-2014), and "frequency", plus "in Europe". They conducted additional searches using the same key words plus the name of each European country.
    The team included only prevalence data obtained by serology using anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), EMA test, tTG test, and/or duodenal biopsy, and only studies that were retrospective and prospective, such as population-based, cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies.
    They found that the overall undiagnosed celiac population in EU is 0.5-1%, whereas the highest estimate reported in population-based studies is approximately 1%.
    Considering data from different periods, incidence seems to range from 0.1 to 3.7/1000 live births in the child population and from 1.3 to 39/100,000/year in the adult population.
    Interestingly, though perhaps unsurprisingly, the data show clear geographical variation in both cases and rates of celiac disease in various European countries.
    They note a rising occurrence of celiac disease in recent decades in European countries, due partly to the advent of improved serological testing (tTG + EMA) and partly to increased awareness of its clinical presentation.
    Source:
    Ann Ig. 2014 Nov-Dec;26(6):485-98. doi: 10.7416/ai.2014.2007.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/26/2015 - If recent reports are any indication, the University of Washington's PR team might be getting ahead of the facts with claims that the university research team is close to developing a cure for celiac disease.
    Numerous articles are claiming that UW researchers are working to develop an enzyme-laden pill that would break down gluten in the stomach, thus permitting people with celiac disease to eat wheat. Hence, the 'cure' idea. The enzyme, it is said, would break it apart into amino acids that could be absorbed with no risk of adverse reaction for people with celiac disease. Well, an enzyme that breaks down gluten is not necessarily the same thing as a 'cure' for celiac disease.
    Ingrid Swanson Pultz, who leads the research project describes the substance as a protein that people with celiac disease will consume orally. The team is looking to begin FDA mandated tests and human trials will sometime in the next two years. The drug "really stands to make an impact on people's lives," Pultz said.
    However, UW is not the only institution working on drugs to treat celiac disease. There are several drug treatments in progress. It's unclear at present, and will remain unclear until the human trial phase whether the enzyme will permit safe gluten consumption by people with celiac disease, or whether it would permit limited gluten consumption within certain parameters.
    In fact, given the numerous products currently under development for celiac disease treatment, and hoping to see release in the next few years, we're likely to hear many claims, much hypes, and plenty of marketing and PR flash.
    Until we actually have a product that works safely and effectively, it seems that any claims regarding a cure for celiac disease are largely overblown PR smoke. That means you, University of Washington. 
    Source:
    http://www.komonews.com/news/health/UW-Researchers-developing-cure-for-celiac-disease-302653671.html

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.