• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    78,070
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Murphdawg
    Newest Member
    Murphdawg
    Joined
  • 0

    Nestec Receives Patent for Method of Predicting Celiac Disease Risk


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 07/26/2013 - There are a number of highly specific and sensitive blood tests that can be used in diagnosing celiac disease; however histological examination of a biopsy taken by endoscopy remains the gold standard for celiac diagnosis.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Photo: CC-- Alexandre DulaunoyHowever, not every patient wants to undergo an endoscopy, and many will happily undergo additional blood tests to avoid or delay endoscopy.

    In an effort to help clinicians make accurate celiac diagnosis without endoscopy and biopsy, the company Nestec S.A. of Vevey, Switzerland, a research and testing subsidiary of Nestlé has obtained U.S. Patent No. 8,409,819, entitled "Methods to predict risk for celiac disease by detecting anti-flagellin antibody levels."

    The inventors have shown that a subset of at risk patients had elevated anti-CBir1 antibodies and that this correlated with HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8 genotypes.

    The inventors showed that a group at risk patients have elevated anti-CBir1 antibodies that correlate with HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8 genotypes.

    Their patent contains two independent claims, numbers 1 and 9, each of which describes a method to aid in predicting whether a patient who is EMA positive, or who has a relative with celiac disease, is at risk for developing celiac disease.

    Each method relies on the CBir1 flagellin antigen, specifically the N-terminal residues 1-147, to determine whether or not a sample from an at-risk patient contains anti-CBir1 flagellin antibodies.

    Flagellin is a part of what makes up bacterial flagella, the molecular mechanism that drives the propeller-like motion in bacteria. The inventors theorize that individuals at risk for celiac disease may have an aggressive immune response to resident bacterial proteins, in this case flagellin.

    This method for predicting celiac disease risk may help clinicians to diagnose patients who wish to avoid endoscopy, or who wish additional tests before doing so. The new patent also notes that the method might help to identify patients at risk of developing celiac disease before any symptoms are present.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest celiacMom

    Posted

    Good article but as far as I know sensitivity to gut bacteria is NOT a a factor in celiac disease, never heard of it as a factor... I thought it was production of antibodies to an enzyme in the gut that digests gluten... I am confused.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   16 Members, 1 Anonymous, 467 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Currently, the Center for Celiac Research is involved in two critical areas:
    * Multi-Center Serological Screening Study to determine the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States; and
    * New Diagnostic Assay to develop a non-invasive diagnostic test for Celiac Disease.
    1) SEROLOGIC SCREENING STUDY
    We have tested 3,076 samples as part of the Multi-Center Serological Study for the prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States. Our preliminary findings indicate that 6.8% of first-degree relatives and 4.7% of second-degree relatives of Celiacs test positive for the disease. These results are similar to those reported previously in Europe, suggesting that Celiac Disease is currently under-diagnosed in the United States.We are extremely encouraged by these preliminary findings; however, many more subjects need to be screened to put the study into full operation. Your financial help is pivotal to accomplish our goals.
    2) NEW DIAGNOSTIC ASSAY
    Our scientists have been able to develop a more sensitive, non-invasive, and specific test for Celiac Disease based on the use of tissue transglutaminase. We were able, for the first time, to clone the human transglutaminase gene. By using this tool, we have developed a new diagnostic tool that may eventually allow us to make a definite diagnosis of Celiac Disease without an intestinal biopsy.
    BLOOD SCREENING UPDATE
    Blood screenings of first and second-degree relatives have been conducted in New York, North Carolina, New Hampshire, California, Pennsylvania, Washington, Maryland, Texas, and Rhode Island.Screenings are scheduled for Billings, Montana June 19th, Louisville, Kentucky September, 18th and Vermont (to be scheduled in Oct/Nov.)
    WEB SITE
    Thanks to the sponsorship of Dietary Specialties, we are very excited to announce that the Center for Celiac Research will have a web site. The domain name will be www.celiaccenter.org. and should be on line by June 21st.
    FUND-RAISING UPDATE
    As of June 1, 1999, the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Research has received approximately $340,000 in contributions and pledges. We thank all of you who have made a contribution or pledge. The Center was very fortunate to receive three significant pledges/contributions over the past four months which helped boost our contribution total by more than $100,000 since our last update. Although this is a significant increase, we must keep the momentum going.
    For now, we cannot rely on any outside financial assistance. So please, help us to help you. Remember we are not asking you to make a contribution, but to make an investment in the well being of every celiac - now and in the future.
    NINTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CELIAC DISEASE
    The Center for Celiac Research, the University of Maryland Program for Continuing Education, the University of Chicago, and the University of California, San Diego are pleased to announce joint sponsorship of the Ninth International Symposium on Celiac Disease. The symposium will be held August 10-13, 2000 at the Marriotts Hunt Valley Inn, Hunt Valley, Maryland.
    The medical program to be presented will discuss the most advanced knowledge of the genetic, immunological, and diagnostic aspects of Celiac Disease. In addition, a panel of international experts will discuss new frontiers for the treatment and prevention of Celiac Disease. Celiacs from around the world will be given the opportunity to compare
    the practical aspects of living with Celiac Disease in different countries and cultures at a full day session. Registration information and costs will be available in August and will be posted on the web site.
    WHAT CAN YOU DO?
    If you have not made a pledge or contribution, please consider making one at this time. Please make checks payable to the UM Foundation, Inc. Center for Celiac Research, Attn: Pam King, 700 W. Lombard St. Room 206, Baltimore, MD 21201. These funds are administered by the University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. If possible, increase your current pledge or make another gift at this time. Discuss the importance of this study with fellow celiacs, relatives, friends or whoever might be in a position to help. Ask them to contribute. Organize discussions and/or fund-raising efforts with your local support group. For example, Tri-County Celiac Sprue from Walled Lake, MI organized a bake sale and the Greater Louisville Celiac Sprue Support Group organized a walk/run event. Both donated the proceeds to the Center. Help us to identify possible organization, companies, trusts or foundations that might be in a position to help. Please contact Pam King at 410-706-8021 if you have any questions or need any assistance. Send contributions to the Center for Celiac Research in honor or in memory of a friend or loved one. Make a gift to the Center in honor of the new year.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 12/31/2002 - Long time celiac and intestinal disease researcher Kenneth Fine, M.D. brought the benefits of his research discoveries, and his medical experience and knowledge to the public through the Internet at www.finerhealth.com, www.enterolab.com, and through a nationwide commitment to lecturing celiac support groups at no charge. Now Dr. Fine has found a new way to serve gluten sensitive individuals and their support organizations: through music!
    Dr. Fine has been a singer-songwriter/guitar player for many years and recently recorded 25 of his original songs in a recording studio with professional studio musicians. These songs are now available on two CDs. After much thought and prayer about how to incorporate more music into his life and how to share it with the public, Dr. Fine has decided to let his musical creativity join his medical professional mission in the sense of working to serve the public. Therefore, he has decided to donate all proceeds from music celiac disease sales to support the not-for-profit public health organization he started in 2000, The Intestinal Health Institute (http://www.intestinalhealth.org), and to support other service organizations as well. The first public service organization he has chosen to support is Americas Gluten Sensitivity support organizations and their local support groups. "My life is fully committed to public service, and I want as many people as possible to enjoy the wonderful health that I, and hopefully you, have experienced since adopting a gluten-free and health-oriented lifestyle. I believe that happiness through music (or by any means) is an important part of health," says Dr. Fine.
    Dr. Fine is offering his music CDs to local celiac support groups to sell as a fund raiser. He also plans musical performances as benefit shows with other music recording artists, and is putting together a group of professional musicians willing to work in a spiritual light to share their musical gifts with the world for a healthy cause. Although Dr. Fine will be bringing his musical hobby to the public in this way, his professional health work, i.e., heading the Intestinal Health Institute and EnteroLab laboratory, public speaking, answering the publics email inquiries, helping people individually by phone, and doing medical research and scientific publishing, will continue unabated. About the name he has chosen to use for his music, Dr. Fine offered this; "To ensure that my desire to share my music with the public does not interfere with my ability to carry out my public health mission, I have opted to use my biblical name, Jude, for my musical last name." Thus, you can peruse his musical web site, read the stories behind his lyrics, and hear song clips at http://www.kennyjude.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/23/2012 - At 2012 Digestive Diseases Week in San Diego, California, Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the publication of data from Phase 2A trial of its main celiac disease compound, ALV003.
    The results show that ALV003, orally administered to celiac disease patients on a gluten free diet, significantly reduces gluten-triggered intestinal mucosal damage.
    For the trial, 41 adults with clinically proven celiac disease who had followed a gluten-free diet for at least one year were randomly given ALV003 or a placebo each day for six weeks. During that time, they also received 2g of gluten in the form of bread crumbs.
    Participants received a small bowel biopsy prior to randomization and again, at the end of the six week challenge.
    The results showed that the study met its primary endpoint of a clinically and statistically meaningful reduction in intestinal mucosal damage in celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. Damage was measured by the ratio of the villus height to crypt depth, or Vh:celiac disease between the ALV003 and placebo treated groups over the six week study period.
    Secondary endpoints included change in intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) density, gastrointestinal symptoms as measured by Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) scores, celiac serologies, safety and tolerability.
    Each subject received small bowel biopsy at the start of the trial, and again after six weeks of daily gluten challenge.
    When researchers compared biopsy results from 34 patients, they found significantly less small intestinal mucosal damage in patients treated with ALV003 than in placebo-treated patients (p=0.013).
    Placebo-treated patients suffered worse damage and symptoms. Most often, these included abdominal distention, flatulence, eructation, abdominal pain and diarrhea.
    The published data shows that:
    Biopsy results for patients who received ALV003 had significantly reduced small intestinal mucosal damage compared with placebo-treated patients (p=0.0133). For placebo-treated patients, IELs, including CD3+ and CD3+ aB and subsets, which measure cellular inflammation responses, were significantly higher, but were mostly normal in the ALV003-treated patients. ALV003-treated patients had better overall GSRS scores and scores for indigestion and abdominal pain symptoms, compared with placebo-treated patients, though the results were not statistically significant. Patients reported no serious adverse events, however, placebo-treated patients reported more regular and consistent non-serious adverse. Such events that occurred in 10 percent or more patients included abdominal distention, flatulence, eructation, diarrhea, nausea, headache and fatigue. Celiac-disease blood tests revealed no significant changes between the ALV003 and placebo-treated patients, though results did show positive trends for tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide antibody titers in the ALV003-treated group, which indicates improved immune response. Daniel Adelman, M.D., Alvine's Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, says that the trial results represent the first time that any such treatment for celiac disease has met its pre-specified primary endpoint of providing protection against damage from gluten-exposure in celiac disease patients, with data that is both clinically and statistically significant.
    Such a drug could help to protect gluten-free celiac disease patients against accidental gluten contamination.
    The company plans to initiate a Phase 2B trial later this year.
    Read the abstract of the presentation (Sa1342) on the DDW website. Review information on Alvine's current clinical trial titled "Evaluation of Patient Reported Outcome Instruments in Celiac Disease Patients" at the NIH website.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/24/2014 - Though some celiacs will tell you they’re content to remain gluten-free for life, being able to freely consume gluten is the dream of many a person with celiac disease.
    ImmusanT is one of the few companies working on an actual vaccine for celiac disease. Over the next few months, ImmusanT is likely to begin reporting data from two separate early-stage clinical trials for NexVax2, a celiac disease vaccine.
    That data will offer the first glimpse into the potential for ImmusanT to treat celiac disease, and into the viability of the company’s peptide immunotherapy platform.
    The current two studies are Phase 1b trials, designed to confirm the safety of NexVax2, and to find a range of potential doses for the company’s next trials. Success at this stage still means a very long process for ImmusanT, as numerous clinical hurdles remain.
    Meanwhile, several other companies trying to find non-vaccine treatments for celiac disease.
    Both San Carlos, CA-based Alvine Pharmaceuticals and Baltimore, MD-based Alba Therapeutics, for instance, are developing drugs to supplement an existing gluten-free diet.
    Rather than being full-blown vaccines, these drugs are intended to reduce or eliminate adverse gluten-reactions due to simple gluten-contamination.
    Another company, Sitari Pharmaceuticals, fueled by $10 million in capital, and a joint venture with GlaxoSmithKline and Avalon Ventures, is also looking to pursue treatments for the digestive disorder.
    For its part, ImmusanT remains committed to its goal of developing a vaccine that will allow celiac patients to eat all the gluten they want.
    The company says its drug is currently the only treatment in development “focusing on disease modification so patients can resume an unrestricted diet.”
    Source:
    Xconomyc.com

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/25/2018 - The latest studies show that celiac disease now affects 1.2% of the population. That’s millions, even tens of millions of people with celiac disease worldwide. The vast majority of these people remain undiagnosed. Many of these people have no clear symptoms. Moreover, even when they do have symptoms, very often those symptoms are atypical, vague, and hard to pin on celiac disease.
    Here are three ways that you can help your healthcare professionals spot celiac disease, and help to keep celiacs gluten-free: 
    1) Your regular doctor can help spot celiac disease, even if the symptoms are vague and atypical.
    Does your doctor know that anemia is one of the most common features of celiac disease? How about neuropathy, another common feature in celiac disease? Do they know that most people diagnosed with celiac disease these days have either no symptoms, or present atypical symptoms that can make diagnosis that much harder? Do they know that a simple blood test or two can provide strong evidence for celiac disease?
    People who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease are often deficient in calcium, fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and zinc. Deficiencies in copper and vitamin B6 are less common, but still possible. Also, celiac disease is a strong suspect in many patients with unexplained nutritional anemia. Being aware of these vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease can help people get bette advice, and hopefully speed up a diagnosis.
    2) Your dentist can help spot celiac disease
    Does your dentist realize that dental enamel defects could point to celiac disease? Studies show that dental enamel defects can be a strong indicator of adult celiac disease, even in the absence of physical symptoms. By pointing out dental enamel defects that indicate celiac disease, dentists can play an important role in diagnosing celiac disease.
    3) Your pharmacist can help keep you gluten-free
    Does your pharmacist know which medicines and drugs are gluten-free, and which might contain traces of gluten? Pharmacists can be powerful advocates for patients with celiac disease. They can check ingredients on prescription medications, educate patients to help them make safer choices, and even speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf.
    Pharmacists can also help with information on the ingredients used to manufacture various vitamins and supplements that might contain wheat.
    Understanding the many vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease, and the ways in which various types of health professionals can help, is a powerful tool for helping to diagnose celiac disease, and for managing it in the future. If you are suffering from one or more of these symptoms, and suspect celiac disease, be sure to gather as much information as you can, and to check in with your health professionals as quickly as possible.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.